Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA

Publisher: Australasian College for Emergency Medicine; Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine, Blackwell Publishing

Journal description

Emergency Medicine Australasia is the official journal of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM) and the Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine (ASEM) and aims to present papers and opinions on all aspects of emergency care in the prehospital and hospital environment. Authors are invited to submit any work that will contribute to the progress of emergency medicine within Australasia and worldwide. The Journal publishes original research articles, critical reviews, editorials, short reports, case reports, letters to the Editor and book and video reviews in the broad area of emergency medicine. Accepted papers become the copyright of the Journal. All original research articles, critical reviews and case reports are reviewed by at least two referees expert in the field of the submitted paper.

Current impact factor: 0.99

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2011 Impact Factor 0.979

Additional details

5-year impact 1.12
Cited half-life 4.90
Immediacy index 0.41
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.34
Website Emergency Medicine Australasia (EMA) website
Other titles Emergency medicine Australasia (Online), EMA
ISSN 1742-6723
OCLC 54312513
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Blackwell Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Some journals impose embargoes typically of 6 or 12 months, occasionally of 24 months
    • no listing of affected journals available as yet
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's server, institutional server or subject-based server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement ("The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com")
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'Blackwell Publishing' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective Because the one-handed chest compression (OHCC) technique uses one hand, unlike the two-handed chest compression (THCC) technique, compression depth might be reduced more rapidly in OHCC than THCC. The present study was conducted to determine whether compression depth was affected within 2 min after the start of OHCC in a simulated in-hospital paediatric arrest model.Methods Forty medical doctors performed continuous OHCC on a child manikin lying on a hard floor using a CPRmeter for 2 min. The hand used to perform the OHCC technique was randomised to the right or left hand. The mean compression depth (MCD) and the mean compression rate (MCR) were calculated at 30 s intervals using the Q-CPR review software.ResultsMCD values decreased significantly with time (0–30 s: 44.3 ± 4.1 mm, 30–60 s: 42.4 ± 4.9 mm, 60–90 s: 40.5 ± 5.8 mm, and 90–120 s: 38.7 ± 5.7 mm; P < 0.001). The MCR also tended to decrease with time (0–30 s: 119.3 ± 12.5/min, 30–60 s: 119.0 ± 13.1/min, 60–90 s: 117.9 ± 14.5/min, 90–120 s: 117.8 ± 14.9/min), and the differences were statistically significant between 30–60 s and 60–90 s (P = 0.037) and between 30–60 s and 90–120 s (P = 0.043).Conclusions Compression depth was decreased significantly from 30 s onwards after starting the OHCC technique using a simulated paediatric arrest model. The results of the present study suggest that future strategies should be established to prevent a decrease in compression depth within 1 min during OHCC.
    Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 03/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM) will introduce high stakes simulation-based summative assessment in the form of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) into the Fellowship Examination from 2015. Miller's model emphasises that, no matter how realistic the simulation, it is still a simulation and examinees do not necessarily behave as in real life. OSCEs are suitable for assessing the CanMEDS domains of Medical Expert, Communicator, Collaborator and Manager. However, the need to validate the OSCE is emphasised by conflicting evidence on correlation with long-term faculty assessments, between essential actions checklists and global assessment scores and variable interrater reliability within individual OSCE stations and for crisis resource management skills. Although OSCEs can be a valid, reliable and acceptable assessment tool, the onus is on the examining body to ensure construct validity and high interrater reliability. © 2015 The Author. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.
    Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 03/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BackgroundA regional epidemiological analysis of Australasian disasters in the 20th century to present was undertaken to examine trends in disaster epidemiology; to characterise the impacts on civil society through disaster policy, practice and legislation; and to consider future potential limitations in national disaster resilience.MethodsA surveillance definition of disaster was developed conforming to the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED) criteria (≥10 deaths, ≥100 affected, or declaration of state emergency or appeal for international assistance). The authors then applied economic and legislative inclusion criteria to identify additional disasters of national significance.ResultsThe surveillance definition yielded 165 disasters in the period, from which 65 emerged as disasters of national significance. There were 38 natural disasters, 22 technological disasters, three offshore terrorist attacks and two domestic mass shootings. Geographic analysis revealed that states with major population centres experienced the vast majority of disasters of national significance. Timeline analysis revealed an increasing incidence of disasters since the 1980s, which peaked in the period 2005–2009. Recent seasonal bushfires and floods have incurred the highest death toll and economic losses in Australasian history. Reactive hazard-specific legislation emerged after all terrorist acts and after most disasters of national significance.Conclusion Timeline analysis reveals an increasing incidence in natural disasters over the past 15 years, with the most lethal and costly disasters occurring in the past 3 years. Vulnerability to disaster in Australasia appears to be increasing. Reactive legislation is a recurrent feature of Australasian disaster response that suggests legislative shortsightedness and a need for comprehensive all-hazards model legislation in the future.
    Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 03/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives To describe patterns of ED utilisation over time, by patient age group and triage classification.Methods Secondary analysis of data from all patients presenting to EDs in Victoria utilising the Victorian Emergency Minimum Dataset (VEMD) for the years 2002–2013. The VEMD includes all hospitals in Victoria with 24 h EDs.ResultsThe absolute number of presentations to EDs in Victoria has grown by over 52% in the last 11 years. The triage categories of highest urgency (1–3) grew by 89% whereas the categories of lowest urgency (4–5) grew by 33%. Over this period, the 5 year age band with the greatest number of ED presentations has consistently been, by far, children 0–4 years of age. This age group has seen an increase of 29% in ED presentations overall with a >55% increase in Triage 1–3, and an increase of 16% in triage 4–5. For all age groups, there has been little change in the number of triage category 4–5 presentations since 2007/2008. However, for triage categories 1–3, there have been consistent increases in presentations across all age groups.Conclusion The age range with the greatest absolute number of ED presentations in Victoria is children 0–4 years of age. This finding is consistent over time and across all triage classifications. The age range with the second highest absolute number of ED presentations is comprised of those 20–24 years of age. This is in contrast to the frequent public attention placed on the volume of ED presentations by the elderly.
    Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 03/2015;
  • Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015; 27(1).
  • Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015; 27(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives This study's objective was to determine whether tuition in medical documentation enhanced the ability of emergency medicine interns to produce effective medical records.Methods The study adopted a case control design, using a retrospective document audit methodology, following an education intervention during the ‘More Learning for Interns in Emergency’ (MoLIE) programme. It was conducted in a tertiary hospital that supports five 10 week rotations of 12 interns each year (n = 60). Controls were drawn from records written in March 2012 and cases from March 2013. A total of 250 medical records written by interns were audited, 125 from each year.ResultsThree categories of documentation were investigated: patient characteristics, clinical impressions and management plan using a purpose-designed score sheet. Three individual items (differential diagnosis [DDX], Support and Impressions [Impress]) showed significant improvement. The proportion of excellent scores for DDX increased by 50% from 40.8% to 61.6%. A χ2 test for independence (with Yates continuity correction) indicated a significant association between the intervention and subsequent score (X2[1, n = 250] = 10.006, P < 0.001, phi −0.208). For Impress, a 48% increase in excellent scores was seen (39.2% to 58.4%). A χ2 test for independence indicated a significant association between the intervention and subsequent score (X2[2, n = 250] = 11.249, P = 0.004, Cramer's V 0.212). The variable Support also improved (X2[2, n = 250] = 8.297, P = 0.012, Cramer's V 0.189) with the number of excellent scores increasing from 37.6% to 48.0%.Conclusion The study demonstrated that documentation of clinical notes by interns can be enhanced by formal tuition.
    Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015; 27(1).
  • Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015;
  • Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015; 27(1).
  • Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015; 27(1).
  • Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015; 27(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To evaluate the impact of the introduction of National Emergency Access Target (NEAT) on access block and long-stay patients in Redcliffe Hospital ED, and to evaluate the possibility of forward compliance with the 2014 and 2015 NEAT thresholds.Setting and DesignRedcliffe hospital is a major urban district hospital in Brisbane with more than 55 000 adult and paediatric patients per annum. We evaluated aggregate Emergency Department Information System data for the years 2011, 2012 and 2013 to correlate presentations, NEAT compliance, access block and the number of long-stay patients in our department.ResultsThere has been a significant reduction in both access block and our number of long-stay patients corresponding with improvements in NEAT compliance. Our forward analysis suggests that without substantial improvements in the NEAT for admitted patients, compliance with 2014 and 2015 thresholds is unlikely to be achievable.ConclusionsNEAT has been a driver of significant improvements in access block at our institution. We see significant issues with raising the NEAT threshold to the proposed 90% in 2015, and support recent calls for re-evaluation and modification of the target.
    Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015; 27(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The emergency department (ED) is a challenging and stressful work environment where communication lapses can lead to negative health outcomes. This article offers strategies to Emergency Medicine residents, nurses and staff physicians on how to improve communication to optimize patient care.
    Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015; 27(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To investigate the first pass success rate, airway grade and complications in two tertiary EDs with the C-MAC video laryngoscope (VL), when compared with standard direct laryngoscopy (DL).Methods This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data entered into an airway registry database in the EDs of Royal North Shore and St George Hospitals (SGH) over a 30 month period. Doctors had the choice of using either DL using a Macintosh or Miller blade or a C-MAC VL for the intubation.ResultsSix hundred and nineteen consecutive patients were recruited. There was no statistical difference between VL and DL in grade of view obtained, P = 0.526. Chance of intubation success increased by more than threefold by using a C-MAC VL in the setting of a grade III/IV (total of 109) on DL (OR = 3.06; 95% CI: 1.52–6.17; P = 0.002).Conclusion This is the first observational study of airway management comparing the C-MAC VL with DL blades in an Australian ED population. Our findings revealed that although the C-MAC VL overall did not provide an enhanced view of the larynx over the Macintosh DL, it was superior to DL when the grade was at least grade III. Currently we are unable to reliably predict the grade by any algorithm prior to intubation. Findings from this study suggest that the C-MAC VL should be considered as the first line laryngoscope in all ED intubations not just the ones predicted to be difficult.
    Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015;
  • Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015; 27(1).
  • Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015; 27(1).
  • Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015; 27(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lithium ion batteries are increasingly utilised within helicopter emergency medical services. Their favourable chemical profile confers many desirable properties: they are small, lightweight and provide a high specific capacity (energy to weight ratio) coupled with a slow self-discharge rate, ensuring a longer functional availability for vital equipment. They are frequently used in routine medical equipment including ventilators, monitors and intravenous pumps, and in aviation specific items, such as satellite and mobile phones, VHF radios and navigation systems.
    Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA 02/2015;