The journal of vascular access (J Vasc Access )

Publisher: Wichtig Editore

Description

  • Impact factor
    0.97
  • 5-year impact
    1.10
  • Cited half-life
    4.10
  • Immediacy index
    0.21
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.27
  • Website
    Journal of Vascular Access, The website
  • Other titles
    The journal of vascular access (Online)
  • ISSN
    1724-6032
  • OCLC
    60648733
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wichtig Editore

  • Pre-print
    • Archiving status unclear
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 6 to 12 months depending on journal
  • Conditions
    • Authors own website, institutional repository/ website or funding body archive
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Author version accepted for publication after peer-review
  • Classification
    ​ white

Publications in this journal

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We describe a technique for rescue surgery of autologous arterovenous fistula (AVF), using bovine mesenteric vein (BMV), which may be used in patients with autologous AVF malfunction caused by steno-occlusion on the arterial side or by fibrosis of the first portion of the vein. To preserve the autologous AVF, we replaced the diseased portion of the artery, or the first centimeters of the vein, by a segment of BMV, with the aim of saving the patency and functionality of the access. We used this technique in 16 cases. All patients underwent hemodialysis treatment immediately after the procedure. Infection or aneurismal dilatation of the graft in implanted BMV was never observed.
    The journal of vascular access 02/2019; 11(2):112-4.
  • The journal of vascular access 03/2014; 15(1):72.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose is to compare the outcomes of FLIXENE™ arteriovenous graft (AVG) to standard polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) AVG for early haemodialysis. Methods: This is a prospective observational study of all AVGs placed over a 40-month period between 2008 and 2011 at our vascular unit. Primary outcome was to examine early cannulation rates for FLIXENE™. Secondary outcomes included patency rates, usability of grafts, complications in particular infections, interventions and death in comparison to standard PTFE grafts. Results: Forty-five FLIXENE™ and 19 standard PTFE AVGs were placed in the study period; 89% of FLIXENE™ grafts were used for dialysis, with 78% cannulated within 3 days. At 18 months, primary patency (FLIXENE™ 34% vs standard PTFE 24%), primary assisted patency (35% vs 36%) and secondary patency rate (51% vs 48%) were not statistically different; 20.2% of FLIXENE™ grafts were infected at 18 months requiring explantation compared with 40.3% of standard PTFE grafts (p=0.14). Conclusions: FLIXENE™ can be cannulated for dialysis within 3 days. It has similar patency and complication rates as other prosthetic grafts in the market. In patients who have no access and require urgent dialysis, FLIXENE™ is a viable option.
    The journal of vascular access 02/2014;
  • The journal of vascular access 02/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this article is to report our experience with drug-eluting balloons for the treatment of juxta-anastomotic stenoses of failing radiocephalic hemodialytic arteriovenous shunt and to evaluate the primary and secondary patency (PP and SP). Methods: After approval by the local hospital's Ethical and Scientific Review Board, 26 consecutive patients with juxta-anastomotic stenosis of radiocephalic hemodialytic shunt were treated with angioplasty with drug-eluting balloon. The main objective was to evaluate PP defined, in accordance with the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative recommendation, as the absence of dysfunction of the vascular access, patent lesion or residual stenosis <30% and no need for further reintervention of the target lesion (TL). PP and SP at 6, 12 and 24 months were evaluated, with echo color doppler and phlebography, for both arteriovenous fistulae, defined as absolute, and TL. Results: Immediate postprocedural technical and clinical success was 100% for all the patients; we had only one technical failure in repeated treatments. At 6 months the absolute and TL PP was 96.1%; at 12 months the absolute PP was 81.8%, TL PP 90.9%, absolute SP 95.4%, TL SP 100%; at 24 months the absolute and TL PP was 57.8%; absolute and TL SP 94.7%; only one arteriovenous fistula was lost during the period. Conclusions: The use of drug-eluting balloons, after standard angioplasty, improves primary patency and decreases reinterventions of TL in juxta-anastomotic stenoses of failing native dialytic arteriovenous shunts.
    The journal of vascular access 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate reasons for tunneled central venous catheter (TCVC) usage in our prevalent hemodialysis population and assess the impact of a surgically aggressive approach to definitive access creation. Methods: Clinical review of all patients in the West of Scotland dialyzing via a TCVC in November 2010 was performed. Reasons for TCVC usage and TCVC complications were evaluated. Over the subsequent year, aggressive intervention was undertaken to achieve definitive access in all suitable patients and outcomes re-evaluated a year later (November 2011). Results: There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients dialyzing via a TCVC in 2010 compared to 2011 (30.3% (n=193) vs. 31.7% (n=201), respectively; p=0.56). All patients now have a "vascular access plan." Of patients dialyzing via a TCVC in 2010, 37% had died by 2011, 22% remained on long-term line, 20% had successful arteriovenous fistula (AVF) creation, 1% had an arteriovenous graft and 2% were transplanted; 10.4% developed complications of vascular access and required ligation of a functioning AVF. A further 6.5% died within 28 days of surgery. The incidence of culture-positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia was 1.6 per 1,000 catheter days. Conclusions: Aggressive strategies of AVF creation resulted in one-fifth of patients on a long-term TCVC having successful creation of an AVF. This was offset against high failure and significant complication rate from AVF creation in this population. One-third of patients dialyzing via a TCVC died in the subsequent year. Correct patient selection for AVF creation is essential and predialysis care must be optimized to avoid the need for TCVCs entirely.
    The journal of vascular access 02/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Purpose: Central venous catheters for maintenance hemodialysis (HD) are designed to attain the required dialysis dose through sustained high blood flow rates (BFR). The authors studied the immediate and long-term performance and complications of two twin-catheter systems, the Tesio catheter (TC) and the LifeCath Twin (LC), to inform clinical practice. Methods: This single-center randomized controlled parallel-group trial allocated 80 incident patients (1:1) to receive either a TC (MedComp) or LC (Vygon). Patients were dialyzed to target BFR 450 mL/min and followed up for 12 months. The primary outcome was achievement of target BFR during the first HD session. Secondary outcomes included thrombotic dysfunction, displacement and catheter-related infection. Catheter dysfunction was defined by a BFR ≤ 250 mL/min. Results: More LCs reached the primary endpoint (44% vs. 10%, p=0.001) delivering a higher BFR (mean 383±82 vs. 277±79 mL/min, p<0.001). Significant differences in BFR persisted until the fourth dialysis session. Rates of catheter-related bacteremia (0.40 vs. 0.51/1,000 catheter days, p=0.7) and exit site infection were similar between groups (0.24 vs. 0.09/1,000 catheter days, p=0.4). Overall rates of catheter dysfunction were 2.8/1,000 catheter days (95% CI 2.1-3.5), with no differences in thrombolytic lock use although the LC group required more thrombolytic infusions (6 vs. 0, p=0.01). Conclusions: The LC can deliver greater BFRs in the first three HD sessions following insertion although this did not translate into differences in performance, dialysis adequacy or complication rates with long-term use. Both catheter types can consistently deliver high BFRs over an extended period of time.
    The journal of vascular access 02/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Purpose: Venous stenosis secondary to neointimal hyperplasia is a major etiology of early arteriovenous fistula (AVF) failure. The natural history of AVF failure is likely influenced by progressive vascular insults to the vein prior to and after AVF creation. The main objectives of this study were to ( 1 ) provide a histologic and morphometric description of non-chronic kidney disease (CKD), upper extremity vein specimens and ( 2 ) perform a morphometric analysis to study venous histology from non-CKD upper extremity veins, veins collected at the time of new vascular access surgery and veins collected from failed stenotic AVFs. Methods: Vein samples from 11 non-CKD deceased donors, 29 subjects receiving new vascular access creation and 20 subjects with stenotic failed AVFs were collected for histologic and morphometric analysis. Results: The mean values of average intima/media thickness ± S.E. from veins collected from non-CKD subjects, subjects receiving new vascular access and subjects with stenotic AVFs were 0.16±0.02, 0.43±0.07 and 3.84±0.55, respectively (p<0.0001). Among donor, non-CKD, vein samples, only diabetes (p=0.0007) was associated with increased average intima/media thickness. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate a progressively increasing venous neointimal hyperplasia development from the non-CKD period through the period of AVF creation and failure. Vascular injuries from complications of progressive CKD prior to access placement and vascular injuries after vascular access placement may play important roles in these progressive vascular changes, and need to be further elucidated.
    The journal of vascular access 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: There has been no report of chronic renal failure cases among patients of Bruton-type agammaglobulinemia (BTA), a congenital immunodeficiency disease. We present a case of chronic renal failure among patients of BTA with difficulty in the management of the hemodialysis vascular access due to infection. Our report is regarding the rare precious, educational experience of a series of setbacks in the hemodialysis vascular access management in a patient with BTA.
    The journal of vascular access 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Advances in device technology have led to a rapid expansion in the number of available devices, which can be used for the formation and maintenance of vascular access. Whilst this may appear to be improving outcomes, there is little evidence to support the use of these devices over currently available methods. Most of the evidence that is available is from small studies with an absence of robust well-designed trials. The examples of "quick-stick" grafts and drug-eluting balloons serve to illustrate this. Whilst there is an enthusiasm for the potential benefits of novel devices there is also a risk - both economically and clinically - to adopting new practices without appropriate and valid comparisons to be made.
    The journal of vascular access 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Aim: The aim of this article is to assess the accuracy of early clinical and ultrasound (US) examination in terms of predicting arteriovenous fistula (AVF) dialysis use. Methods: Physical and US examination of patent AVF was performed 4 weeks after fistula creation. AVF dialysis use was defined as subsequent use of an AVF for at least six consecutive dialysis sessions with two needles and a blood flow of more than 200 mL/min. Results: Of 119 AVF patent at 4 weeks, 26 (22%) failed. Clinical examination was 96% sensitive for predicting successful dialysis, but only 21% specific for failure. Vein diameter above 5 mm and an arterial end-diastolic velocity above 110 cm/s were the best US predictors for dialysis use. Vein diameter was slightly better than arterial velocity in terms of predicting maturity (sensitivity: 83% vs 67%, specificity: 68% vs 65%). All assessments predicted AVF maturity (positive predictive value: clinical = 81%, US diameter = 90%, US velocity = 87%) much better than AVF failure (negative predictive value: clinical = 63%, US diameter = 53%, US velocity = 37%). Conclusion: One month after surgery, a new AVF with a thrill or a vein diameter >5 mm is likely to be used for dialysis. An AVF not meeting these criteria has an increased risk of failure and further investigations may be required.
    The journal of vascular access 02/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Arteriovenous hemodialysis fistulas (AVFs) serve as a lifeline for many individuals with end-stage renal failure. A common cause of AVF failure is cephalic arch stenosis. Its high prevalence compounded with its resistance to treatment makes cephalic arch stenosis important to understand. Proposed etiologies include altered flow in a fistulized cephalic vein, external compression by fascia, the unique morphology of the cephalic arch, large number of valves in the cephalic outflow tract and biochemical changes that accompany renal failure. Management options are also in debate and include angioplasty, cutting balloon angioplasty, bare metal stents, stent grafts and surgical techniques including flow reduction with minimally invasive banding as well as more invasive venovenostomy with transposition surgeries for refractory cases. In this review, the evidence for the clinical relevance of cephalic arch stenosis, its etiology and management are summarized.
    The journal of vascular access 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Objective: To determine how frequent inflow stenosis is a contributing factor in the etiology of arteriovenous access-induced steal (AVAIS). Methods: A retrospective review of hemodialysis patients who underwent interventions from October 1998 to December 2011 for AVAIS was conducted at Mount Sinai Hospital. Patients with grade 3 AVAIS and complete arch and upper extremity vascular imaging were included. Demographics, access history, time to AVAIS, preoperative angiographic imaging and interventions performed were analyzed. Results: A total of 52 patients were diagnosed with grade 3 (severe) AVAIS requiring intervention over the study period. Forty-seven percent of the patients were male, average age was 62 years, 47% were of African American race and 88% were diabetic. Seventeen consecutive patients, with imaging, were included in this study. The average time to presentation of steal symptoms was 147±228 days. All of the accesses were proximal, and 65.7% were autogenous. Imaging studies consisted of angiography ( 14 ) and computed tomography angiography ( 3 ). Five patients had imaging evidence of >50% luminal inflow stenosis (29.4%). The location of stenosis was the subclavian (3 cases) and brachial (2 cases) arteries. Patients underwent distal revascularization and interval ligation ( 3 ), ligation ( 1 ) and angioplasty/stenting ( 1 ). Conclusion: In our population, nearly one-third of the patients with severe AVAIS had a significant subclavian or brachial artery stenosis. The implications of this finding suggest the importance of complete preoperative imaging. The treatment of the inflow stenosis by itself may not be curative, but the correction may serve as an adjunct and contribute to the success of other therapeutic procedures.
    The journal of vascular access 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Purpose: Ultrasound (US)-guided internal jugular vein access has been the standard practice of central venous port (CVP) placement. The subclavian vein (SCV) access has also been preferred, but has potential risk of pinch-off syndrome (POS). The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of US-guided SCV access to avoid POS in patients with CVP. Methods: Included in this study were patients who had undergone CVP placement via the SCV. We mainly assessed the computed tomography (CT) findings from two different placement techniques of a CVP via the SCV: (i) venipuncture point described by the ratio between the distance from the venipuncture point to the sternoclavicular joint and the clavicular length; and (ii) presence of direct attachment of the catheter to the clavicle. Secondary outcome was POS rate associated with two different placement techniques of CVP via the SCV. Results: A total of 237 patients were included in this study between August 2007 and January 2011. A total of 100 patients (42.2%) underwent CVP placement using the landmark technique while 137 patients (57.8%) underwent CVP placement by US guidance. CT revealed that the US-guided technique tended to be lateral SCV approach compared with the landmark technique (p<0.001). A total of four patients (1.7%) experienced POS, all of them in the landmark group. Conclusion: Our results showed that the US-guided technique determines a more lateral SCV approach, with a reduced POS risk than the landmark venipuncture technique.
    The journal of vascular access 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Purpose: A surveillance duplex scan detected a stenosis within a left groin hemodialysis loop graft in a 57-year-old woman who was allergic to both iohexol and gadolinium contrast agents. This precluded the use of standard angioplasty treatment techniques. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) uses a catheter mounted with a miniaturized ultrasound probe to produce detailed cross-sectional vessel images. Clinically, it has been used in the assessment of coronary artery disease but has also supplemented standard angiography techniques in the assessment of peripheral vascular and hemodialysis access lesions. Methods: IVUS was utilized as the solitary imaging modality to identify the graft stenosis and guide the placement of a 6 mm diameter angioplasty balloon. Two areas of stenosis were successfully dilated and subsequent IVUS re-examination showed abolition of the stenosis. Results: Twelve-month follow-up surveillance scan showed that the graft remained functional with good flow rates. Conclusions: In the setting of contrast allergy, IVUS may provide a valid and safe tool in the localization and treatment of peripheral vessel stenosis, including arteriovenous fistula angioplasty. To our knowledge this is the first reported use of IVUS for hemodialysis graft salvage adopting a completely 'contrast-free' technique. More studies are required to establish the true role of IVUS in the management of hemodialysis access angioplasty, but this successful case contributes valuable information to the literature on its clinical application.
    The journal of vascular access 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Carotid-jugular arteriovenous fistula (C-J AVF) after inadvertent carotid puncture during internal jugular vein puncture is a rare entity. Previously, majority of reported cases of CJAVF were identified during inadvertent arterial puncture and managed as emergency. We report a delayed presentation of congestive cardiac failure following multiple attempts at securing an internal jugular venous access for dialysis 3 months prior to diagnosis. Carotid-jugular fistula was identified during workup and was successfully treated by endovascular technique with a covered stent.
    The journal of vascular access 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Purpose: Fibrin deposition and thrombotic occlusion represent a serious cause of access dysfunction in hemodialysis central venous catheters (CVCs). The aim of this work was to define and apply a method for imaging and quantifying fibrin in thrombi formed into the side holes of CVCs. Methods: Forty-three CVCs removed from a cohort of dialyzed patients were analyzed in this pilot study. Hematoxylin and eosin and a modified Carstair's staining were applied on permanent thrombus sections. Fluorescence microscopy and image analysis were performed to quantify the fibrin amount. Results: Highly fluorescent areas were invariably associated with fibrin by Carstair's method. The deposition of concentric layers of fibrin and erythrocytes was easily identified by fluorescence microscopy, showing growth features of the thrombus. Fibrin amount in diabetic patients was significantly higher than that in nondiabetic patients with median (interquartile range) values of 51% (47-68%) and 44% (30-54%), respectively (p=0.032). No significant difference in fibrin content was found by grouping data according to catheter type, permanence time, insertion site and dialysis vintage. Higher variability in fibrin values was found in thrombi from CVCs removed after 1-15 days compared with 16-60 days. A trend of an increase in fibrin amount in thrombi was noted according to blood platelet count at CVC insertion. Conclusions: The analytical method presented here proved to be a rapid and effective way for quantifying fibrin content in thrombi formed on CVCs with potential application in future clinical studies.
    The journal of vascular access 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Background: Verification of proper placement of an intravenous catheter may not always be simple. We evaluated the auscultation technique for this purpose. Methods: Twenty healthy volunteers were randomized for 18G catheter inserted intravenously either in the right (12) or left arm (8), and subcutaneously in the opposite arm. A standard stethoscope was placed over an area approximately 3 cm proximal to the tip of the catheter in the presumed direction of the vein to grade on a 0-6 scale the murmur heard by rapidly injecting 2 mL of NaCl 0.9% solution. The auscultation was evaluated by a blinded staff anesthesiologist. Results : All 20 intravenous injection were evaluated as flow murmurs, and were graded an average 5.65 (±0.98), whereas all 20 subcutaneous injections were evaluated as either crackles or no sound, and were graded an average 2.00 (±1.38), without negative results. Sensitivity was calculated as 95%. Specificity and Kappa could not be calculated due to an empty false-positive group. Conclusions: Being simple, handy and noninvasive, we recommend to use the auscultation technique for verification of the proper placement of an intravenous catheter when uncertain of its position. Data obtained in our limited sample of healthy subjects need to be confirmed in the clinical setting.
    The journal of vascular access 01/2014;
  • The journal of vascular access 01/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Purpose: After creation of a brachiocephalic (BC) arteriovenous fistula (AVF), stenosis of the cephalic vein close to its junction with the axillary vein (cephalic arch stenosis, CAS) can develop. Flow impairment and access thrombosis are the consequences, sometimes complicated by prestenotic aneurysm of the cephalic vein. We here report our experience with cephalic vein transposition (CVT) for CAS. Methods: From March 2007 through February 2012, symptomatic CAS was detected in 25 patients (13 female) with either dysfunction (n=14) or thrombosis (n=11) of their BC AVF. All were treated by CVT: the vein was ligated and cut distally to the stenotic segment, then tunneled subcutaneously to the medial aspect of the upper arm and anastomosed to the proximal brachial or basilic vein in an end-to-side fashion. Simultaneous thrombectomy of the cephalic vein was performed in 11 patients and aneurysmorrhaphy in 9. In addition, one patient had a proximal new AV anastomosis, another angioplasty of an in-stent restenosis of the access-draining subclavian vein. Results: After CVT, two acute complications (8%) occurred: access thrombosis (one) and bleeding (one). During follow-up (1 to 54 months, median 13 months, 34.5 patient-years), six patients died with functioning AVF, three were successfully transplanted. Primary (secondary) 1-year patency was 79% (90%), with a reintervention rate of 0.1/patient/year. Conclusions: Primary 1-year access patency rates after CVT compare favorably with those after interventional treatment, and reintervention rates are lower. Frequently occurring prestenotic aneurysms could be repaired simultaneously. CVT should therefore be regarded as the treatment of choice for CAS.
    The journal of vascular access 11/2013;

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