Anesthesiology Research and Practice Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Hindawi Publishing Corporation

Journal description

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
ISSN 1687-6970
OCLC 220311955
Material type Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Publisher's version/PDF may be used
    • Creative Commons Attribution License
    • Eligible UK authors may deposit in OpenDepot
    • All titles are open access journals
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Sugammadex was introduced to Royal Perth Hospital in early 2011 without access restriction. Two departmental audits (26-page online survey and 1-week in-theatre snapshot audit) were undertaken to investigate the change of beliefs and clinical practice related to the use of neuromuscular blocking agents at the Royal Perth Hospital since this introduction. Results were compared with data from 2011. We found that, in the 2.5 years since introduction of Sugammadex, more anesthetists (69.5 versus 38%) utilized neuromuscular monitoring, and aminosteroidal neuromuscular blocking agents were used in 94.3% of cases (versus 77% in 2011). Furthermore, 53% of anesthetists identified with a practice of "deeper and longer" intraoperative paralysis of patients. All 71 patients observed during the 5-day in-theatre audit were reversed with Sugammadex. Since the introduction of Sugammadex, 69% (n = 20) of respondents felt it provided "faster turnover," less postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade (n = 23; 79%), and higher anesthetist satisfaction (n = 17; 59%). 45% (n = 13) of colleagues reported that they would feel professionally impaired without the unrestricted availability of Sugammadex, and 1 colleague would refuse to work in a hospital without this drug being freely available. In clinical practice Sugammadex was frequently (57%) mildly overdosed, with 200 mg being the most commonly administered dose.
    Anesthesiology Research and Practice 01/2015; 2015:367937. DOI:10.1155/2015/367937
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    ABSTRACT: Anaesthetists in the acute and chronic pain teams are often involved in treating Complex Regional Pain Syndromes. Current literature about the risk factors for the onset of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 (CRPS 1) remains sparse. This syndrome has a low prevalence, a highly variable presentation, and no gold standard for diagnosis. In the research setting, the pathogenesis of the syndrome continues to be elusive. There is a growing body of literature that addresses efficacy of a wide range of interventions as well as the likely mechanisms that contribute to the onset of CRPS 1. The objective for this systematic search of the literature focuses on determining the potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1. Eligible articles were analysed, dated 1996 to April 2014, and potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1 were identified from 10 prospective and 6 retrospective studies. Potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1 were found to include being female, particularly postmenopausal female, ankle dislocation or intra-articular fracture, immobilisation, and a report of higher than usual levels of pain in the early phases of trauma. It is not possible to draw definite conclusions as this evidence is heterogeneous and of mixed quality, relevance, and weighting strength against bias and has not been confirmed across multiple trials or in homogenous studies.
    Anesthesiology Research and Practice 01/2015; 2015:956539. DOI:10.1155/2015/956539
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important comorbidity of chronic kidney disease, and reducing cardiovascular events in this population is an important goal for the clinicians who care for chronic kidney disease patients. The high risk for CVD in transplant recipients is in part explained by the high prevalence of conventional CVD risk factors (e.g., diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia) in this patient population. Current transplant success allows recipients with previous contraindications to transplant to have access to this procedure with more frequency and safety. Herein we provide a series of eight patients with dilated cardiomyopathy with poor ejection fraction posted for live donor renal transplantation which was successfully performed under regional anesthesia with sedation.
    Anesthesiology Research and Practice 12/2014; 2014:525969. DOI:10.1155/2014/525969
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    ABSTRACT: Background. This study aimed to evaluate and compare total cost of sevoflurane and propofol for 1.0 MAC-hour of anaesthesia, employing three anaesthetic techniques. Methods. Adult patients scheduled for surgical procedures under general anaesthesia anticipated to last approximately an hour were randomized into three groups (n = 15 each), to receive anaesthesia using one of the following techniques: low flow technique involving induction with propofol, followed by sevoflurane delivered using initial fresh gas flows of 6 L/min till MAC reached 1.0 and then reduced to 0.5 L/min; alternate method of low flow entailing only a difference in fresh gas flow rates being maintained at 1 L/min throughout; the third technique involving use of sevoflurane for both induction and maintenance of anaesthesia. Results. Cost of sevoflurane to maintain 1 MAC-hour of anaesthesia was clinically least with low flow anaesthesia, though statistically similar amongst the three techniques. Once the cost of propofol used for induction in two of the three groups was added to that of sevoflurane, cost incurred was least with the technique using sevoflurane both for induction and maintenance of anaesthesia, as compared to low flow and alternative low flow techniques, a 26% and 32% cost saving, respectively (P < 0.05).
    Anesthesiology Research and Practice 10/2014; 2014:459432. DOI:10.1155/2014/459432
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction. Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) provides superior analgesia for breast surgery when used in conjunction with general anesthesia (GA). Although TPVB and GA are often combined, for some patients GA is either contraindicated or undesirable. We present a series of 28 patients who received a TPVB with sedation alone for breast cancer surgery. Methods. A target controlled infusion of propofol or remifentanil was used for conscious sedation. Ultrasound guided TPVB was performed at one, two, or three thoracic levels, using up to 30 mL of local anesthetic. If required, top-up local infiltration analgesia with prilocaine 0.5% was performed by the surgeon. Results. Most patients were elderly with significant comorbidities and had TPVB injections at just one level (54%). Patient choice and anxiety about GA were indications for TVPB in 9 patients (32%). Prilocaine top-up was required in four (14%) cases and rescue opiate analgesia in six (21%). Conclusions. Based on our technique and the outcome of the 28 patients studied, TPVB with sedation and ultrasound guidance appears to be an effective and reliable form of anesthesia for breast surgery. TPVB with sedation is a useful anesthetic technique for patients in which GA is undesirable or poses an unacceptable risk.
    Anesthesiology Research and Practice 08/2014; 2014:127467. DOI:10.1155/2014/127467
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    ABSTRACT: The teaching curriculum in anesthesia involves traditional teaching methods like topic-based didactic lectures, seminars, and journal clubs; intraoperative apprenticeship; and problem-based learning (PBL) and simulation. The advantages of incorporating PBL in anesthesia teaching include development of skills like clinical reasoning, critical thinking, and self-directed learning; in addition it also helps in developing a broader perspective of case scenarios. The present paper discusses the characteristics, key elements, and goals of PBL; various PBL methods available; lacunae in the existing knowledge of PBL research; its current status and future perspectives in anesthesia teaching.
    Anesthesiology Research and Practice 05/2014; 2014:263948. DOI:10.1155/2014/263948
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    ABSTRACT: Background: This study was designed to assess and compare the effect of head and neck position on the oropharyngeal leak pressures,cuff position (employing fibreoptic view of the glottis)and ventilation scores between ProSeal LMA and the I-gel. Material and Methods: After induction of anesthesia, the supraglottic device was inserted and ventilation confirmed. The position of the head was randomly changed from neutral to flexion, extension and lateral rotation (left). The oropharyngeal leak pressures, fibreoptic view of glottis, ventilation scores, delivered tidal volumesand end tidal CO2 were noted in all positions. Results:In both the groups‟compared with neutral position;oropharyngeal leak pressures were significantly higher with flexion and lower with extension, but similar with rotation of head and neck.{ProSeal LMA (Neutral: 28 ± 4.19cm H2O, Flexion: 32 ± 4.11cm H2O, Extension: 24 ± 4.00 cm H2O and Lateral Rotation28 ± 3.15cm H2O). I-gel (Neutral: 22± 3.23cm H2O, Flexion: 25 ± 3. 64cm H2O, Extension: 19± 2. 61cm H2O, Rotation: 22± 2.74cm H2O)} However the oropharyngeal leak pressure was significantly higher for ProSeal LMA compared with the I-gel in all the position. Peak airway pressures were significantly higher with flexion in both the groups (however this did not affect ventilation),lower with extension in ProSeal group and comparable in I-gel group but did not change significantly with rotation of head and neck in both the group. Conclusion: Effective ventilation can be done with both ProSeal.Conclusion: Effective ventilation can be done with both ProSeal LMA and I-gel with head in all the above position. ProSeal LMA has a better margin of safety than I-gel due to better sealing pressures except in flexion where the increase in airway pressure is more with the former.Extreme precaution should be taken in flexion position in ProSeal LMA
    Anesthesiology Research and Practice 01/2014; 2014.