Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications

Publisher: Hindawi Publishing Corporation

Description

The purpose of the journal Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications is to publish original research in the form of articles, notes, letters and reviews in the general field of bioinorganic chemistry and its applications. Its scope includes all aspects of bioinorganic chemistry, including bioorganometallic chemistry and applied bioinorganic chemistry. The journal welcomes papers relating to metalloenzymes and model compounds, metal-based drugs, biomaterials, biocatalysis and bioelectronics, metals in biology and medicine, metals toxicology and metals in the environment, metal interactions with biomolecules and spectroscopic applications.

  • Impact factor
    1.17
  • 5-year impact
    1.29
  • Cited half-life
    5.30
  • Immediacy index
    0.34
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.27
  • Website
    Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications website
  • Other titles
    Bioinorganic chemistry and applications (Online)
  • ISSN
    1687-479X
  • OCLC
    62523224
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Publisher's version/PDF may be used
    • Creative Commons Attribution License
    • Eligible UK authors may deposit in OpenDepot
    • All titles are open access journals
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: New series of organotin(IV) complexes and Schiff bases derived from amino acids have been designed and synthesized from condensation of 1H-indole-2,3-dione, 5-chloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione, and 𝛼-amino acids (phenylalanine, isoleucine, and glycine). All compounds are characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, and molecular weight determinations. Bonding of these complexes is discussed in terms of their UV-visible, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H, 13C, and 119Sn NMR) spectral studies. The results suggest that Schiff bases behave as monobasic bidentate ligands and coordinate with dibutyltin(IV) in octahedral geometry according to the general formula [Bu2Sn(L)2]. Elemental analyses and NMR spectral data of the ligands with their dibutyltin(IV) complexes agree with their proposed distorted octahedral structures. Few representative compounds are tested for their in vitro antibacterial activity against Gram-positive (B. cereus, Staphylococcus spp.) and Gramnegative (E. coli, Klebsiella spp.) bacteria. The results show that the dibutyltin complexes are more reactive with respect to their corresponding Schiff base ligands.
    Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications 01/2014; 2014.
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    ABSTRACT: Alginate-gelatin mixed gel was applied to immobilized laccase for decolorization of some synthetic dyes including crystal violet. The immobilization procedure was accomplished by adding alginate to a gelatin solution containing the enzyme and the subsequent dropwise addition of the mixture into a stirred CaCl(2) solution. The obtained data showed that both immobilized and free enzymes acted optimally at 50°C for removal of crystal violet, but the entrapped enzyme showed higher thermal stability compared to the free enzyme. The immobilized enzyme represented optimum decolorization at pH 8. Reusability of the entrapped laccase was also studied and the results showed that ca. 85% activity was retained after five successive cycles. The best removal condition was applied for decolorization of seven other synthetic dyes. Results showed that the maximum and minimum dye removal was related to amido black 10B and eosin, respectively.
    Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications 01/2012; 2012:823830.
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    ABSTRACT: A V-shaped ligand Bis(2-benzimidazolymethyl)amine (bba) and its nickel(II) picrate (pic) complex, with composition [Ni(bba)(2)](pic)(2)·3MeOH, have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, molar conductivities, IR spectra, and UV/vis measurements. In the complex, the Ni(II) ion is six-coordinated with a N(2)O(4) ligand set, resulting in a distorted octahedron coordination geometry. In addition, the DNA-binding properties of the Ni(II) complex have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence, and viscosity measurements. The experimental results suggest that the nickel(II) complex binds to DNA by partial intercalation binding mode.
    Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications 01/2012; 2012:609796.
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    ABSTRACT: A mononuclear complex of Zn(II), [Zn(DIP)(2) (DMP)] (NO(3))(2)·2H(2)O in which DIP is 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline and DMP is 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine has been prepared and characterized by (1)HNMR spectroscopy, FT-IR, UV-Vis and elemental analysis techniques. DNA-binding properties of the complex were studied using UV-vis spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and viscosity measurements. The results indicate that this zinc(II) complex can intercalate into the stacked base pairs of DNA and compete with the strong intercalator ethidium bromide for the intercalative binding sites.
    Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications 01/2012; 2012:571913.
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    ABSTRACT: The biosorption of mercury (II) on 14 fungal biomasses, Aspergillus flavus I-V, Aspergillus fumigatus I-II, Helminthosporium sp., Cladosporium sp., Mucor rouxii mutant, M. rouxii IM-80, Mucor sp 1 and 2, and Candida albicans, was studied in this work. It was found that the biomasses of the fungus M. rouxii IM-80, M. rouxii mutant, Mucor sp1, and Mucor sp 2 were very efficient removing the metal in solution, using dithizone, reaching the next percentage of removals: 95.3%, 88.7%, 80.4%, and 78.3%, respectively. The highest adsorption was obtained at pH 5.5, at 30°C after 24 hours of incubation, with 1 g/100 mL of fungal biomass.
    Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications 01/2012; 2012:156190.
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    ABSTRACT: Interactions between metal ions and different forms of melanin play significant roles in melanin biochemistry. The binding properties of natural melanin and related synthetic materials can be exploited for nonbiological applications, potentially including water purification. A method for investigating metal ion-melanin interactions on solid support is described, with lead as the initial target. 2.5 cm discs of the hydrophobic polymer PVDF were coated with synthetic eumelanin from the tyrosinase-catalyzed polymerization of L-dopa, and with melanin extracted from human hair. Lead (Pb(2+)) binding was quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy (flame mode), and the data was well fit by the Langmuir model. Langmuir affinities ranged from 3.4 · 10(3) to 2.2 · 10(4) M(-1). At the maximum capacity observed, the synthetic eumelanin coating bound ~9% of its mass in lead. Binding of copper (Cu(2+)), zinc (Zn(2+)), and cadmium (Cd(2+)) to the synthetic-eumelanin-coated discs was also investigated. Under the conditions tested, the Langmuir affinities for Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Cu(2+) were 35%, 53%, and 77%, respectively, of the Langmuir affinity for Pb(2+). The synthetic-eumelanin-coated discs have a slightly higher capacity for Cu(2+) on a per mole basis than for Pb(2+), and lower capacities for Cd(2+) and Zn(2+). The system described can be used to address biological questions and potentially be applied toward melanin-based water purification.
    Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications 01/2012; 2012:361803.