Acta Paediatrica

Publisher: Wiley

Journal description

Current impact factor: 1.84

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 1.842
2012 Impact Factor 1.974
2011 Impact Factor 2.073
2010 Impact Factor 1.955
2009 Impact Factor 1.768
2008 Impact Factor 1.517
2007 Impact Factor 1.411
2006 Impact Factor 1.297
2005 Impact Factor 1.277
2004 Impact Factor 1.143
2003 Impact Factor 1.128
2002 Impact Factor 1.26
2001 Impact Factor 1.582
2000 Impact Factor 1.315
1999 Impact Factor 1.13
1998 Impact Factor 0.952
1997 Impact Factor 0.81
1996 Impact Factor 0.754
1995 Impact Factor 0.765
1994 Impact Factor 0.852
1993 Impact Factor 0.811
1992 Impact Factor 0.827

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.06
Cited half-life 8.70
Immediacy index 0.41
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 0.67
Other titles Acta pædiatrica (Oslo, Norway: 1992: Online), Acta paediatrica
ISSN 1651-2227
OCLC 37664034
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • On author's personal website, institutional repositories, arXiv, AgEcon, PhilPapers, PubMed Central, RePEc or Social Science Research Network
    • Author's pre-print may not be updated with Publisher's Version/PDF
    • Author's pre-print must acknowledge acceptance for publication
    • On a non-profit server
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher source must be acknowledged with citation
    • Must link to publisher version with set statement (see policy)
    • If OnlineOpen is available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • If OnlineOpen is available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 24 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 07/08/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • Acta Paediatrica 08/2015; 104(8):751. DOI:10.1111/apa.13048
  • Bernardo L Horta, Christian Loret de Mola, Cesar G Victora
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    ABSTRACT: This study was aimed at systematically reviewing evidence of the association between breastfeeding and performance in intelligence tests. Two independent searches were carried out using Medline, LILACS, SCIELO and Web of Science. Studies restricted to infants and those where estimates were not adjusted for stimulation or interaction at home were excluded. Fixed and random-effects models were used to pool the effect estimates, and a random-effects regression was used to assess potential sources of heterogeneity. We included 17 studies with 18 estimates of the relationship between breastfeeding and performance in intelligence tests. In a random-effects model, breastfed subjects achieved a higher IQ [mean difference: 3.44 points (95% confidence interval: 2.30; 4.58)]. We found no evidence of publication bias. Studies that controlled for maternal IQ showed a smaller benefit from breastfeeding [mean difference 2.62 points (95% confidence interval: 1.25; 3.98)]. In the meta-regression, none of the study characteristics explained the heterogeneity among the studies. Breastfeeding is related to improved performance in intelligence tests. A positive effect of breastfeeding on cognition was also observed in a randomized trial. This suggests that the association is causal. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13139
  • Amar Taksande, Rewat Meshram
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    ABSTRACT: The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all children have a headcircumference measurement at each well-child visit until two years of age. Low head circumference is associated with preterm birth and very low birth weight as well as a variety of genetic, nutritional and health factors (1). Microcephaly is an important neurological sign, but there is nouniformity in its definition and no standardisation. It is important to measure head circumference in infants, because this correlates with brain size and growth.Deviations from normal head growth may be the first indication of an underlying congenital, genetic or acquired problem.Microcephaly is usually defined as a head circumference of two or more standard deviations below the mean or less than the second percentile for age and sex. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13140
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the outcomes among critically ill young children with Down syndrome using propensity score matching from a national database. Patients in the age group from 1 day through 24 months admitted to an intensive care unit during their hospital stay at a Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS)-participating hospital (2004-2013) were included. Of the 293,697 patients who qualified for inclusion, 12,282 (4%) were classified in the Down syndrome group. Using propensity score matching, 10,477 patients with Down syndrome were matched 1-1 to patients without Down syndrome. Prior to matching, the mortality was significantly lower among the Down syndrome patients (With vs. Without Down syndrome, Odds Ratio (OR), 0.74; 95% Confidence Interval (CI), 0.69 to 0.79; p<0.001). After matching, the mortality was similar in both groups (OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.07; p=0.51). The mortality risk increased among the Down syndrome patients with increasing hospital length of stay. In this large, contemporary cohort, Down syndrome did not confer a significantly higher mortality risk among children with critical illness. However, children with Down syndrome followed a time-dependent, differential mortality risk with increased risk noted in relation to increasing hospital length of stay. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13138
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the efficacy of automated control of the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2 ) in comparison to manual FiO2 control in maintaining target pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) range. Crossover physiologic study involving preterm infants requiring mechanical ventilation and supplemental oxygen. Each infant was studied for 2 consecutive 12-hour in a random sequence. Outcome measures included the proportion of time with SpO2 within and outside the target range of 90-95%, extreme hypoxaemia (<80%) and hyperoxaemia (≥98%). Complete dataset was available in 27 infants. The percentage of time (median, IQR) within the target range was higher during automated control 72.8 (58.8-82.6) compared to manual control 59.6 (49.3-73.3), p=0.031. Corresponding reduction in percent time below the target range was 18.1 (12.7-23.6) versus 25.9 (17.8-30.7), p=0.028, and above the target range 4.8 (3-16) versus 10.1 (6.4-22.5), p=0.026. Median (IQR) percent time spent with severe hypoxaemia (SpO2 <80%) and severe hyperoxaemia (SpO2 ≥98%) were 1.3 (0.1-2.9) versus 3.2 (1.4-6.1), p= 0.022 and 0.08 (0.05-0.36) versus 1.7 (0.7-6.8), p=0.001 respectively. Median number of manual adjustments of FiO2 per 12-hour was 0 and 63 respectively. Automated control of FiO2 significantly improved compliance of oxygen saturation targeting and significantly reduced exposure to hypoxaemia as well as hyperoxaemia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13137
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    ABSTRACT: Strict milk protein avoidance has been the standard therapy of cows' milk allergy (CMA) in children, but oral immunotherapy (OIT) seems to provide an alternative treatment. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the impact of OIT on milk consumption during the first 2.5 years after a start of OIT. This open-label, non-controlled, real-life OIT study was conducted in 74 children with CMA, who were age five to 15. It included a six-month induction phase and a two-year maintenance phase. Data on the complete 2.5-year trial were available for 57 children. Most of the children (82%) completed the six-month induction phase and were able to consume at least 200ml of milk or 6,400mg of milk protein a day. After the two-year maintenance phase, half were consuming milk daily. Risk factors for OIT failure during the induction phase were asthma and high milk-specific immunoglobulin E, but a history of anaphylaxis before OIT was not. Allergies to eggs or wheat decreased the risk of immediate OIT failure. This study confirmed the efficacy of milk OIT in real life, including the whole spectrum of persistent CMA at school age and revealed certain risk factors associated with OIT failure. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13131
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    ABSTRACT: Abdominal pain symptoms and incontinence are common in childhood. The aim of this study was to analyse abdominal pain symptoms and their associations with incontinence and symptoms of anxiety and depression in young children. We examined 1,130 children during the school-entry check-up (mean age 6.2 years) and 951 participated in the study. Parents completed a questionnaire contained 11 items regarding Rome-III functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and incontinence and 14 items from the anxious/depressed scale of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Of the 951 children (55.6% boys) we recruited, 30.1% had experienced abdominal pain symptoms in the past two months and 14% had complained of them at least once a week. In addition, 2.6% had irritable bowel syndrome, 11.3% had childhood functional abdominal pain, 2.4% were affected by faecal incontinence, 2.1% by daytime urinary incontinence and 5.5% by nocturnal enuresis. One in ten (10.6%) had symptoms of anxiety and depression and these were significantly higher in the children with FGIDs, particularly if they were also incontinent. Nearly a third of the children (30.1%) had abdominal pain symptoms and FGIDs were associated with significantly higher symptoms of anxiety and depression, especially if children were also incontinent. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13134
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    ABSTRACT: To provide comprehensive evidence of the effect of interventions on early initiation, exclusive, continued and any breastfeeding rates when delivered in five settings: (i) Health systems and services (ii) Home and family environment (iii) Community environment (iv) Work environment (v) Policy environment or a combination of any of above. Out of 23977 titles identified through a systematic literature search in PUBMED, Cochrane and CABI, 195 articles relevant to our objective, were included. We reported the pooled relative risk and corresponding 95% confidence intervals as our outcome estimate. In cases of high heterogeneity, we explored its causes by subgroup analysis and meta-regression and applied random effects model. Intervention delivery in combination of settings seemed to have higher improvements in breastfeeding rates. Greatest improvements in early initiation of breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding and continued breastfeeding rates, were seen when counselling or education were provided concurrently in home and community, health systems and community, health systems and home settings respectively. Baby friendly hospital support at health system was the most effective intervention to improve rates of any breastfeeding. To promote breastfeeding, interventions should be delivered in a combination of settings by involving health systems, home and family and the community environment concurrently. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13127
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    ABSTRACT: One-third of childbearing women take prescription opioids, previously occurring only in 6-7% pregnant women. Prenatal opioid exposures may cause birth defects, altered brain development, and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). NAS incidence increased 4-fold and length of stay increased from 13 to 19 days over 10 years (2004-2013), leading to 7-fold increases in NICU-days due to NAS. Initial data suggest that recent NAS increases have resulted from increased use of prescription opioids rather then illicit drugs. Pediatricians will have to manage the consequences of prenatal opioid exposures, as the offspring often have complex medical and social issues associated with these families. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13121
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    ABSTRACT: Cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has already been used to detect pain-associated cortical activity in newborn infants. Two-channel NIRS has identified significant responses in cortical areas, such as the somatosensory cortex, in association with painful blood sampling procedures (1-3). However, neuroimaging studies in adults have showed that a painful conscious experience activated additional cortical areas, such as the motor cortex and the secondary somatosensory cortex (4). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13122
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    ABSTRACT: The complex physiological events that occur during the transition from fetal to extra-uterine life justify special consideration. The Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) algorithm was developed to provide a basic approach that was readily translatable to a broad range of professionals engaged in delivery room resuscitative efforts. Since its introduction, the use of the NRP algorithm has extended beyond its original application in the delivery room to its use in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), but without any research on its scientific merit or formal evaluation of its impact. Resuscitation beyond the delivery room is sometimes multifactorial, it is often unpredictable and there is a risk that healthcare staffs are not always well prepared.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13116
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    ABSTRACT: Ethics consultation is a common and consolidated practice in North America, unlike in most European countries. In their very interesting paper Thomas et al reviewed the extensive records of paediatric ethics consultation at their institution in Cleveland, Ohio (1) This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13119
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    ABSTRACT: Thank you Dr Mariani for your helpful remarks regarding our study. We believe that the table is correct and supports our statements in the conclusions "Tongue colour was a specific but insensitive sign that indicated when SpO2 was <70%. When the tongue is pink, it is likely that an infant has an SpO2 of more than 70% and does not require supplemental oxygen". This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13123
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    ABSTRACT: We read with interest the Spanish study by Cano and Sánchez-Luna that discussed individualised psychological interventions for parents in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) (1). The ability of this kind of intervention to improve the psychological wellbeing of parents has been widely reported in the literature. The best results, reported by Melnyck et al (2), were on the Creating Opportunities for Parent Empowerment (COPE) programme, a structured and reproducible four-stage intervention developed by nurses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13126
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    ABSTRACT: Most Finnish births take place in hospital, but out-of-hospital deliveries (OHDs) have increased. This study evaluated trends and reasons for OHDs in the Tampere University Hospital catchment area. The study cohort included all planned and unplanned OHDs in the Hospital area from 1996-2011; the control group comprised two hospital births for each OHD. Trends in incidence and risk factors for OHDs, including neonatal morbidities, were established and compared to the controls. OHDs accounted for 67 (0.10%) of the 76,773 births in the area, the proportion remaining unchanged between 1996-2005, but then increasing. Risk factors associated with OHDs were smoking during pregnancy, short labour, higher number of previous births, single status, residence more than 35 kilometres from the delivery unit and fewer prenatal visits. OHD cases were more likely to be admitted to the neonatal care unit than controls and to be treated for suspected infections and hypothermia. Smoking, short duration of labour, a higher number of previous births, single status and longer distances from the delivery unit were associated with OHDs. Most mothers had OHDs without antenatal care and their infants had more neonatal morbidities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2015; DOI:10.1111/apa.13117