Orbis Litterarum

Description

Orbis Litterarum is an international journal devoted to the study of European and American literature. Concentrating on literary theory and the principles of literary history and criticism Orbis Litterarum publishes articles of a theoretical nature and analyses of specific works genres periods etc.

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  • Website
    Orbis Litterarum website
  • Other titles
    Orbis litterarum (Online)
  • ISSN
    1600-0730
  • OCLC
    47651471
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although they are completely different types of works, Giorgione's painting, La tempesta (1508) and Charles Baudelaire's poem “Correspondances” (1857) from his collection Les fleurs du mal seem to provoke a similar sense of mystery in the viewer/reader. If we can clearly see what the two works “represent” in the sense of images, their meaning and/or purpose seem to evade us when we try to close-read them. Using a contrastive method inspired by the lingusitic theory of the same name to compare their effect, we will try to show how this artificial proximity can enable us to analyze works that seem to “resist” our hermeneutical desire and build a critical discourse based precisely on this resisting, following in the foosteps of Arnaud Rykner.1
    Orbis Litterarum 12/2014; 69(6).
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    ABSTRACT: Don Paterson's Orpheus (2006) is an English-language version that transmutes Rilke's original Die Sonette an Orpheus (1922). Abandoning the imperative for prosodic equivalence and claiming instead to locate the ‘spirit of the original’, Paterson's sonnets can be reread as performing peculiar linguistic enactments of poetic truths exigent (philosopher Martin Heidegger claims) in Rilke's sonnets. In the essay ‘Poetically man dwells’, Heidegger claims ‘Poetry is a measuring’ and that the ‘nature of the image is to let something be seen’; elsewhere, the philosopher argues Rilke's work performs an illuminating projection of lexis (words) and logos (order, knowing). In his version, however, Paterson foregrounds variation when ushering the spirit of Rilke's images into English sounds: through a range of creative decisions (poiesis, techné, ekphrasis), the contemporary poet achieves gestural equivalence through his radical rewriting of Rilke's glimpsed truths.1
    Orbis Litterarum 12/2014; 69(6).
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    ABSTRACT: This article presents a reading of Gillian Mears's novel Foal's Bread (2011) as a postcolonial counter-pastoral that problematizes conventional mythologies of Australian identity and rethinks the relationships with humans, land, and non-humans. By challenging naturalized ways of telling stories of the relationship between humans and nature, Mears's novel deconstructs the anthropocentric and hierarchical world view promoted in the discourses of modernity and colonialism and underlines the entanglement of humans, animals, and their shared natural world. Horses, in particular, play an important role in the novel both thematically and in terms of its imagery. This essay suggests that Foal's Bread reconstructs the pastoral mode and reworks the connection between humans and the natural world from a perspective that rethinks interspecies relations and the division into human and non-human animals. In so doing the novel inserts humans into the contexts of land and landscape, making them inseparable from it, and also reconstructs the text as a form of nature.1
    Orbis Litterarum 10/2014; 69(5).
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    ABSTRACT: This essay explores how Chesnutt uses gothic strategies to expose the historical contradictions of race and conjure up black-abject, revisiting the American gothic via Kristeva's concept of “the abject.” The Conjure Woman (1899) deploys gothic strategies to speak of the unspeakable experiences associated with slavery and contest the rationalist discourses that enforce and legitimate racism. Chesnutt's conjure stories reverse the “national process of forgetting” in the Reconstruction era to reintegrate the nation through the racially charged abjection process. His use of the gothic decisively reverses racist abjection through the juxtaposition of narratives between the former slave Julius and the Yankee investor John. Chesnutt's stories create a space of struggle between the oppressed and oppressor by summoning the abject that has been thrown off in the institution of Western hegemony. Julius's conjure stories wield the subversive power to challenge John and Annie, disrupt their binary thought, and instigate a form of multiple discourse. The Conjure Woman became a groundwork articulating the African-American presence through inarticulate gothic sounds and imagery, and has paved the road for later generations of African-American literature to continue to summon up the black-abject that has long been silenced and marginalized.1
    Orbis Litterarum 10/2014; 69(5).
  • Orbis Litterarum 10/2014; 69(5).
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    ABSTRACT: Die literarische Analyse textueller Vermittlung des Blickes auf Frauen im Kontext von kultureller Aterität, Orientalism und Gender Studies ist keine Seltenheit. Innovativ ist im vorliegenden Beitrag die Erschließung von Repräsentationen persischer Frauen im Kontext der Alteritätsforschung im doppelten Sinne: Zum einen soll die Perspektive auf den Umgang mit kultureller Andersartigkeit und deren Reflexionen in einem persisch-deutschen Kontext und zum anderen auf die geschlechtsspezifische Alterität aus der Perspektive der Gender Studies erweitert werden. Der Beitrag setzt in der frühen Phase kultureller Fremdkonstruktion und im Aufkommen einer Reisebeschreibungskultur an, blickt in die zweite Phase des Wissenserwerbs über fremde Kulturen und möchte die Annahme begründen, dass das Bild persischer Frauen zum einen im Kontext einer dem Beobachter als fremd geltenden Kultur und zum anderen im Kontext eines geschlechtsspezifisch Anderen, d.h. männlichen Blickes entsteht und so einer zweifachen Fremdheit ausgesetzt ist: der gesellschaftlich-kulturellen und der geschlechtsspezifischen.
    Orbis Litterarum 10/2014; 69(5).
  • Orbis Litterarum 08/2014; 69(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Seventeenth-century Spain produced an impressive amount of mythological poetry with virtually every lyrical genre and all poetic registers represented. In this poetic treasure house we find mythological canciones, sonnets and letrillas alongside minor poetic forms, and serious as well as burlesque versions of famous classical myths such as those of Apollo and Daphne, Narcissus, Ganymede, and Venus and Adonis. The present article takes off from the heuristic thesis that the baroque mythological corpus yields interesting insights into seventeenth-century patterns of thought regarding a series of issues that were at odds with contemporary ideology, but could be related to and explored through classical myth. One such issue was sexual desire, whose representation in literature the theologians at Trent had recently prohibited. The period's interrelation of myth and desire is eloquently documented in contemporary art, which explored the amorous adventures of the pagan gods to create a kind of erudite erotica. Similarly, mythological poetry, epic and drama exploited the stories about the loves of the gods related by ancient poets such as, notably, Ovid. However, one genre in particular cultivated the relation between myth and desire: the sonnet.
    Orbis Litterarum 08/2014; 69(4).
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    ABSTRACT: En exploitant un thème tabou pendant la dictature communiste – la déportation des Allemands, dès 1945, dans les camps soviétiques – La bascule du souffle est une démonstration poétique d'une force rare. Conçu comme un livre écrit « à deux mains », en collaboration avec le poète Oskar Pastior, dont l'expérience concentrationnaire inspire l'histoire du protagoniste, le roman porte les empreintes stylistiques des deux auteurs, bien que, suite à la mort du poète, le projet initial n'ait pas pu être finalisé. Critiqué pour la prétendue illégitimité de la reconstitution – à la première personne – d'une histoire qui n'aurait pas affaire à l'expérience personnelle de la romancière, tout comme pour son style « artificiel », jugé inadéquat au sujet traité, le roman superpose deux fictions identitaires, en ayant un enjeu cathartique par rapport à l'expérience traumatique de Herta Müller (fille d'une ancienne déportée) et un autre éthique, en tant qu'hommage rendu à Pastior et à toutes les victimes de l'enfer concentrationnaire. Construit comme une fiction « allo-autobiographique », dans l'absence, donc, de l'appropriation (impossible) du « pacte autobiographique », le roman garantit l'authenticité de l'évocation justement par la « présentification » poématique d'une expérience « indicible », doublée de celle de l'écriture en tant que modalité de survivance1.
    Orbis Litterarum 08/2014; 69(4).
  • Orbis Litterarum 08/2014; 69(4).
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    ABSTRACT: E. T. A. Hoffmann's 1817 Gothic novella, Das öde Haus, and Gérard de Nerval's 1853 novella of personal reminiscence, Sylvie, may not at first sight seem obvious choices for comparison. But their presentations of deluded love disclose both the paradoxical approach to ‘marginality’ in the nineteenth century, and the inextricable conjunction of theme and form in narrative more generally. In these stories, the protagonists are given undiluted narrative authority. They are socially and literarily central figures who are drawn to the margins of society. Yet their modes of storytelling belie their pretentions of social ‘normality’. Both narrators transform the dimensions of time and space in their retrospective accounts of deluded infatuation. In so doing, they illustrate their own collusions in the creation of and identification with liminal figures. The novellas depict strikingly similar presentations of voyeurism, narcissism and fetishism, suggesting that ultimately it is the partial nature of the gaze that imbues the women with desirability. ‘Otherness’ becomes appealing as its unknowability allows the projection of the protagonists' own fantasies. As the mysteries are unveiled, desire evaporates. Marginality thus infiltrates theme and form in these novellas, while the narrators occupy an unstable space between centre and periphery.
    Orbis Litterarum 08/2014; 69(4).
  • Orbis Litterarum 08/2014; 69(4).
  • Orbis Litterarum 08/2014; 69(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Behind the making of a great work, in any language, there is a significant contribution from intertextual elements. Textual dialectics – a result of the interplay of multiple texts within a text – plays a major role in converting an otherwise ordinary work into a canonical work. It is in this sense that Eliot wrote that appreciation of any art is invariably an appreciation of the entire artistic tradition in which the new art is situated. When a translator chooses to translate such works in which there is a rich interplay of intertextual elements, he is invariably left with no better option than to bring in these elements, lest he should run the risk of reducing classics to works of mediocrity. In this process of translating intertextual elements, what problems does a translator encounter and what strategies does he adopt to overcome them? This paper attempts to explore the intricate and organic relationship that exists between translation, tradition and intertextuality against the backdrop of my English translation of Sankranti, a classic Kannada play written by P. Lankesh, one of the gifted writers of the Kannada world.
    Orbis Litterarum 06/2014; 69(3).
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    ABSTRACT: In ‘Théodore de Banville’, Baudelaire highlights hyperbole as the very marrow of modern lyric as it speaks to the very spirit of the word lyre, ‘l'ardente vitalité spirituelle’. In fact, leafing through Les fleurs du mal, one can readily find hyperboles which inspire in the reader the affective intensity of le vertige, a word that recurs in Baudelaire's poetical works. Nevertheless, whilst hyperbole occurs frequently in his poems and is central to his affective poetics, the scholarship on his poetical use of hyperbole is skimpy. The aim of this paper is therefore twofold. First, it seeks to do justice to Baudelaire's keen engagement in hyperbole. There are few Baudelaire critics who have called attention to his taste for hyperbole; moreover, in attending to the issue they show only lukewarm interest. Second, in paying sufficient attention to his fascination with hyperbole, this paper also aims to cast light on how Baudelaire impregnates his hyperboles with Longinian phantasia, ‘image-production’, to practise the Romantic – subjective and affective – expression of beauty fully.
    Orbis Litterarum 06/2014; 69(3).
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    ABSTRACT: In diesem Beitrag werden die Interaktionsformen der Figuren im literarisch dargestellten Raum untersucht, einem See- und Landgebiet im Indischen Ozean, das von drei Autoren der zweiten Hälfte des neunzehnten Jahrhunderts (Emilio Salgari, Karl May und Jules Verne) beschrieben wird. Die Gattung des Abenteuerromans, der die Werke dieser Schriftsteller zugeschrieben werden können, erweist sich im Vergleich mit anderen literarischen Formen beim Thema Raum als besonders sensibel. Im Spiegel von Der Nomos der Erde und Land und Meer setzt sich der Beitrag außerdem mit der Rolle auseinander, die Carl Schmitt der Landnahme zuschreibt, und wendet seine Begriffe von Nahme, Teilung und Weiden auf die Romane und Erzählungen der Autoren. Bei der Betrachtung, wie sie sich in diesen Kontexten widerspiegeln, wird erkennbar, welchen Einfluss das Verhältnis der Subjekte zum Raum auf Umwelt, Besitz, Körper und auch Wissen hat.
    Orbis Litterarum 06/2014; 69(3).
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    ABSTRACT: This article examines the representation of the experience of public transportation in Benito Pérez Galdós's ‘La novela en el tranvía’, a short story published just months after the inauguration of the first tram line in Madrid in 1871. The first half of the essay explores the different ways in which omnibus and tram travel were represented in nineteenth-century literature and examines how Galdós draws on these conventions in representing the experience of public transportation in the story. The second part of the article examines the importance of this new space in Galdós's treatment of the narrator's quixotism: what happens when the Don Quixote plot is re-enacted on a streetcar?
    Orbis Litterarum 06/2014; 69(3).
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    ABSTRACT: In his Confessions (1782, 1789) Jean-Jacques Rousseau asserts the central importance of memory in his life, because it is only through memory that he can be fully present to himself. His most complete celebration of the present through the medium of memory is in the Fifth Walk of his Rêveries (1782), where he recollects his short stay on the island of Saint-Pierre (1765) by way of his ecstatic experience of “le sentiment de l'existence.” The unhappy celebrity writer near the end of his life turns to imaginatively enhanced recollections to supplement his actual experiences on the island by way of a Romantic mnemotherapy as a compensatory mode of remembrance. Rousseau's differing autobiographical accounts (in his Confessions and Rêveries) of his time as a happy recluse on the island are a poeticized version of the biographical facts, and it is only in his final and unfinished work that Rousseau realized most fully the therapeutic strategy of a healing recherche du temps perdu in the prose poetry of the Fifth Walk that constitutes a central document of European Romanticism.
    Orbis Litterarum 04/2014; 69(2).
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    ABSTRACT: On expanding the two-part Prelude of 1799 to The Prelude of 1805, Wordsworth made several important alterations to the two ‘spots of time’ childhood memories as he transferred them from Part One of the 1799 version to Book Eleventh of the 1805 version. One of these revisions concerns the poet's account of his childhood experience of accidentally arriving at a spot where in former times a murderer had been hanged. In the 1799 version, a ridge shaped like a grave marks the site of execution. In later versions this grave-shaped mound is replaced by an inscription: the murderer's name carved on the turf. The insertion of the motif of the inscription turns the scene of execution into a literal site of memory, but it also functions as a metaphorical representation of the phenomenon of memory. The paper explores the implications of the inscription as metaphor of memory in a reading of the two spots.
    Orbis Litterarum 04/2014; 69(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Die Sonette aus Venedig, entstanden als Manuskript 1824, publiziert August Graf von Platen (1796–1835) 1825 während seines zweiten Aufenthaltes in „dieser Inselstadt“ seiner Sehnsucht. Wiederholt erscheint der Sonettzyklus des inzwischen durch die Heinrich-Heine-Krisis berühmt-berüchtigt gewordenen Dichters im Sammelband Gedichte (1828). Der Fall Venedigs bietet sich für den zukünftigen Italien-Historiker und Autor der Geschichten des Königsreichs Neapel von 1414 bis 1443 (1833) als unumgängliche Topographie der Erinnerung an. In der Zweitausgabe werden anderweitige Erinnerungen in den Vordergrund gerückt. Der Sonettendichter streicht 1828 sämtliche Zeilen des letzten Sonetts und ersetzt sie mit der Selbstbeschreibung des lyrischen Ich, dem „von Zeit zu Zeit ein Ruf der Gondoliere“ gar nicht wahrnehmbar ist. Die sich im Lauf der Jahre von 1824 bis 1828 verändernden Personalerinnerungen entsprechen der Stadttopographie, der Stadtgeschichte und dem Aufbau des Textes – mit allerlei Kanälen und Irrwegen, „[d]ie tausendfach sich ineinander schlingen“. Im Zentrum dieser Untersuchung steht das Adjektiv „matt“, welches dasjenige bezeichnet, was Platen in seinen Sonetten umarbeiten wollte. Es entsteht dadurch die Schilderung eines spätromantischen Komplexes unterschiedlicher Erinnerungsmodi, in dem die Vergangenheit (Antike, Renaissance, napoleonische Ära) in persönliche Rückblicke übergeht.
    Orbis Litterarum 04/2014; 69(2).