Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis (J Thromb Thrombolysis)

Publisher: LINK (Springer), Springer Verlag

Journal description

The Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis is a long-awaited resource for contemporary cardiologists hematologists and clinician-scientists actively involved in treatment decisions and clinical investigation of thrombotic disorders involving the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems. Its principal focus centers on the pathobiology of thrombosis and the use of anticoagulants platelet antagonists and thrombolytic agents in scientific investigation and patient care. The journal publishes original work that interlinks basic scienctific principles with clinical investigation thus creating a unique forum for interdisciplinary dialogue. Published works will advocate the development of solid platforms for planned clinical research and precise clinically-applicable benchwork. The Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 's comprehensive and interdisciplinary design will expand the reader's knowledge base and provide important insights for the most rapidly growing field in medicine. The journal seeks original manuscripts devoted to laboratory investigation and clinical studies. State-of-the-art reviews and editorials will be summoned by invitation. The journal will closely follow new trends on the cutting edge of the field and highlight drugs in the early stages of development which may warrant testing in the clinical arena. Updates of major national and international clinical trials will also be provided as will a forum of guidelines for interpreting the results of these trials from a patient care perspective. The Journal will publish an ongoing educational series of topics applicable to clinician scientists that will include such topics as: 'Seminars in Thrombosis Thromboysis and Vascular Biology' and a 6-part series on 'Hematology for the Cardiologist'. Manuscripts submitted must not be under consideration by an other journal and should not have been published elsewhere in similar form. All articles will be refereed by two qualified referees. All clinical trials being considered for publication will also be reviewed by a statistician. A response will be provided within four weeks of receipt.

Current impact factor: 2.04

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.039
2012 Impact Factor 1.985
2011 Impact Factor 1.476
2010 Impact Factor 1.539
2009 Impact Factor 1.846
2008 Impact Factor 2.266
2007 Impact Factor 1.432
2006 Impact Factor 1.155
2005 Impact Factor 1.093
2004 Impact Factor 0.909
2003 Impact Factor 1.066
2002 Impact Factor 1.067
2001 Impact Factor 1.055
2000 Impact Factor 0.785

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.70
Cited half-life 4.00
Immediacy index 0.30
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.49
Website Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis website
Other titles Journal of thrombosis and thrombolysis (En ligne)
ISSN 1573-742X
OCLC 300185160
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients receiving non-vitamin-K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOAC) are commonly excluded from thrombolytic therapy, as interpretation of coagulation tests remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the applicability of a novel institutional protocol for thrombolysis based on current expert recommendations and NOAC specific coagulation assessment. We included hospitalized AIS patients receiving NOAC for at least 24 h and consecutive AIS patients not receiving NOAC into a prospective study. We performed standard coagulation tests and specific tests for dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban plasma levels. We studied 65 patients: mean age 72 ± 13 years, 30 (46 %) male, median NIHSS score 3 (IQR 6). Fifteen (23 %) were on NOAC treatment (5 dabigatran, 5 rivaroxaban, and 5 apixaban, respectively) and 50 (77 %) were not. In patients without NOAC, dabigatran was not detectable (0 ng/ml), and plasma levels of rivaroxaban (median: 10.0 ng/ml, IQR 7.0) and apixaban (7.2 ng/ml, IQR 6.7) were below our lower thresholds that allow thrombolysis. In patients with dabigatran pre-treatment, trough levels (58.0 ng/ml, IQR 143.0) were below our upper threshold that would allow thrombolysis in 3/5 patients. In patients receiving rivaroxaban, trough level (68.0 ng/ml, IQR 64.0) was below our predefined upper thresholds that would allow thrombolysis in 4/5 patients. In all patients on apixaban, trough level was above our predefined threshold of 40 ng/ml that precludes thrombolysis (98.2 ng/ml, IQR 84.3). Predefined thresholds of NOAC plasma levels in the decision of thrombolysis in NOAC treated AIS patients might supplement routine coagulation tests and should be validated in a larger study population.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 05/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1229-z
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the most common cause of preventable mortality in hospitalized patients, and pulmonary embolism is responsible for 5-10 % of all hospital deaths. To estimate the hospital mortality in hospitalized patients who developed VTE during hospitalization. Prospective cohort of all adult inpatients >17 years admitted to the hospital between August 2006 and August 2013, and follow-up until discharge to measure death. VTE incident cases were captured prospectively from the Institutional Registry of Thromboembolic disease in a tertiary hospital care in Buenos Aires. In hospital global mortality and fatality rate of inpatients with VTE was calculated. The cumulative incidence of VTE was 1.8 % (95 % CI 1.77-1.93 %), representing 1.32 % (95 % CI 1.23-1.41 %) in the subgroup of surgical patients and 2.1 % (95 % CI 1.9-2.2 %) in clinical inpatients. The overall hospital mortality was 2.4 % (95 % CI 2.35-2.53); being 3.95 % (95 % CI 3.78-4.12) in clinical inpatients and 1.15 % (95 % CI 1.06-1.23) in surgical patients. The death in patients who had developed VTE, represented between 4 and 7 % of hospital deaths, and it increases with age in both clinical and surgical patients. In Argentina there are few data of hospital mortality in patients with VTE. This information is useful when assessing the need for resources for prevention, diagnosis and treatment in inpatients.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 05/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Greater use of evidence-based therapies has improved outcomes for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in recent decades. Consequently, more ACS patients are surviving beyond 12 months; however, limited data exist to guide treatment in these patients. Long-term outcomes have not improved in non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients at the same rate seen in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients, possibly reflecting NSTEMI patients' more complex clinical phenotype, including older age, greater burden of comorbidities and higher likelihood of a previous myocardial infarction (MI). This complexity impacts clinical decision-making, particularly in high-risk NSTEMI patients, in whom risk-benefit assessments are problematical. This review examines the need for more effective long-term management of NSTEMI patients who survive ≥12 months after MI. Ongoing risk assessment using objective measures of risk (for bleeding and ischemia) should be used in all post-MI patients. While 12 months appears to be the optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy for most patients, this may not be the case for high-risk patients, and more research is urgently needed in this population. A recent subgroup analysis from the DAPT study in patients with or without MI who had undergone coronary stenting (31 % presented with MI; 53 % had NSTEMI) and the prospective PEGASUS-TIMI 54 trial in patients with a prior MI and at least one other risk factor (40 % had NSTEMI) demonstrated that long-term dual antiplatelet therapy improved cardiovascular outcomes but increased bleeding. Further studies will help clarify the role of dual antiplatelet therapy in stable post-NSTEMI patients.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 05/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1227-1
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the most common cause of preventable mortality in hospitalized patients, and pulmonary embolism is responsible for 5-10 % of all hospital deaths. To estimate the hospital mortality in hospitalized patients who developed VTE during hospitalization. Prospective cohort of all adult inpatients >17 years admitted to the hospital between August 2006 and August 2013, and follow-up until discharge to measure death. VTE incident cases were captured prospectively from the Institutional Registry of Thromboembolic disease in a tertiary hospital care in Buenos Aires. In hospital global mortality and fatality rate of inpatients with VTE was calculated. The cumulative incidence of VTE was 1.8 % (95 % CI 1.77-1.93 %), representing 1.32 % (95 % CI 1.23-1.41 %) in the subgroup of surgical patients and 2.1 % (95 % CI 1.9-2.2 %) in clinical inpatients. The overall hospital mortality was 2.4 % (95 % CI 2.35-2.53); being 3.95 % (95 % CI 3.78-4.12) in clinical inpatients and 1.15 % (95 % CI 1.06-1.23) in surgical patients. The death in patients who had developed VTE, represented between 4 and 7 % of hospital deaths, and it increases with age in both clinical and surgical patients. In Argentina there are few data of hospital mortality in patients with VTE. This information is useful when assessing the need for resources for prevention, diagnosis and treatment in inpatients.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 05/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1234-2
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    ABSTRACT: A dose of 0.9 mg/kg of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) has proven to be beneficial in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Dosing of t-PA based on estimated patient weight (PW) increases the likelihood of errors. Our objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of estimated PW and assess the effectiveness and safety of the actual applied dose (AAD) of t-PA. We performed a prospective single-center study of AIS patients treated with t-PA from May 2010 to December 2011. Dose was calculated according to estimated PW. Patients were weighed during the 24 h following treatment with t-PA. Estimation errors and AAD were calculated. Actual PW was measured in 97 of the 108 included patients. PW estimation errors were recorded in 22.7 % and were more frequent when weight was estimated by stroke unit staff (44 %). Only 11 % of patients misreported their own weight. Mean AAD was significantly higher in patients who had intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) after t-PA than in patients who did not (0.96 vs. 0.92 mg/kg; p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed an increased risk of ICH for each 10 % increase in t-PA dose above the optimal dose of 0.90 mg/kg (OR 3.10; 95 % CI 1.14-8.39; p = 0.026). No effects of t-PA misdosing were observed on symptomatic ICH, functional outcome or mortality. Estimated PW is frequently inaccurate and leads to t-PA dosing errors. Increasing doses of t-PA above 0.90 mg/kg may increase the risk of ICH. Standardized weighing methods before t-PA is administered should be considered.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 05/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1232-4
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    ABSTRACT: Each year venous thromboembolism (VTE) causes up to 60,000 deaths in the UK, many resulting from hospital-acquired thromboses following elective surgery. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines state that all elective surgical patients should receive verbal and written information pre-operatively regarding the risks of developing VTE. This audit assessed elective surgical patient's prior awareness of VTE and examined how effective targeted patient education during the pre-operative assessment is in increasing this awareness. A 13 point questionnaire designed to assess a pre-operative patient's understanding of topics relating to VTE was provided to consecutive patients identified as being at risk of developing VTE at the end of their pre-operative assessment over a two-week period. A total of 68 questionnaires were completed. Provision of verbal and written information was poor (47 %, n = 32 and 47 %, n = 32 respectively). Despite this, 71 % (n = 48) of patients were aware of the consequences of developing VTE. Many patients correctly identified surgery (71 %, n = 48), immobility (71 %, n = 48) and being overweight (68 %, n = 46) as risk factors, but not dehydration (47 %, n = 32). Lack of awareness regarding personal methods to reduce the risk of developing a VTE post-operatively (24 %, n = 16) and potential side-effects of medical prophylaxis (32 %, n = 22) were also identified. Many patients already possess an awareness of VTE, however, specific knowledge regarding its risk factors and methods of prevention is lacking. Provision of targeted written and verbal educational information during the pre-operative assessment is an effective method of increasing a patient's awareness of these topics. Increased patient awareness may empower patients in their post-operative recovery and enable them to make more informed decisions regarding VTE prophylaxis options.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 05/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1224-4
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    ABSTRACT: Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with a significant hypercoagulable state and several hemostatic anomalies have been identified in this disease state. Of interest, SCD patients can become iron overloaded after transfusion, and iron can enhance fibrinogen as a substrate for thrombin, resulting in thrombi that commence coagulation quickly and form rapidly. We hypothesized that SCD patients would display hypercoagulable plasma coagulation kinetics and an iron enhancement of coagulation. After obtaining IRB approval, we assessed coagulation kinetics and iron enhancement with viscoelastic methods in archived, citrated plasma obtained from ambulatory or hospitalized SCD patients (n = 20). All SCD patients had plasmatic hypercoagulability, and 65 % were positive for iron enhancement of coagulation. In conclusion, continuing investigation correlating such viscoelastic data with clinical symptoms may provide insight into the role played by iron in the setting of SCD, including complications such as vaso-occlusive crisis.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 05/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1230-6
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    ABSTRACT: Pharmacologic prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an important aspect of medical care, particularly in the inpatient setting. Low-molecular weight heparins, heparin, and fondaparinux are commonly used agents to prevent VTE, each of which has well established dosing regimens in patients with normal body mass index. Dosing of these medications in morbidly obese populations (BMI > 40 kg/m(2)) is not as clearly defined in guidelines. This article reviews published data to support specific dosing regimens and monitoring strategies of these agents in this population. The most validated parenteral agent to prevent VTE in morbidly obese hospitalized patients is enoxaparin, dosed at 40 mg subcutaneously (SC) twice daily. If unfractionated heparin is utilized for prophylaxis in morbidly obese patients, a dose of 7500 units SC three times daily should be considered. Monitoring of anti-factor Xa levels to guide prophylactic dosing is an option, although the utility of this lab test is limited, as target anti-Xa ranges for VTE prophylaxis have not been universally defined and trials have not shown a clear link between anti-factor Xa levels and bleeding or thrombotic events. Additional studies are needed to clearly define the most appropriate dosing strategies in patients with moderate obesity (BMI 35-40 mg/m(2)) and those with extreme obesity (BMI > 60 mg/m(2)).
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 05/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1231-5
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    ABSTRACT: Endoluminal devices such as metallic flow diversion (FD) and aneurysm bridging (AB) stents are used for treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Treatments are associated with thrombogenic events mandating the use of dual antiplatelet therapy in all cases. In the current in vitro study, we utilize a slow binding fluorogenic thrombin specific substrate to measure the thrombin generation potential of six devices: four FD devices (Pipeline™ Flex embolization device, Pipeline™ Flex embolization device with Shield Technology™, SILK+, FRED™) and two AB devices (Solitaire™ AB, LEO+). We show that the Pipeline™ Flex embolization device with Shield Technology™ has significantly lower peak thrombin and takes significantly longer time to achieve peak thrombin (time to peak) compared to the other three FD devices (p < 0.05), with statistically similar results to the less thrombogenic AB devices. We conclude that surface modification of endoluminal stents could be an effective method to mitigate thrombogenic complications.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 05/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1228-0
  • Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 05/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1220-8
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    ABSTRACT: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the United States. Traditionally, warfarin has been used to prevent the occurrence of stroke in intermediate-to-high risk patients. Target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) have become a favorable alternative; however, recommendations for differentiating between the available TSOACs were lacking within the 2012 CHEST guidelines. The objective of this retrospective, observational study was to identify current anticoagulation prescribing habits in patients admitted with new-onset AF, and evaluate the appropriateness of discharge therapy based on national guidelines. Additionally, a practice guideline was created for use at our institution to stratify appropriate use of TSOACs. Patients were included if they were at least 18 years old and were admitted with a primary diagnosis of new-onset, non-valvular AF between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013. CHADS2, CHA2DS2VASc, and HAS-BLED scores were calculated based on patient data. Between July 2012 and June 2013, 143 patients were included in the study. The average CHADS2 score was 1.7, the average CHA2DS2VASc score was 3.0, and the average HAS-BLED score was 2.4. The use of no antithrombotics decreased as the CHA2DS2VASc score increased, aspirin use stayed consistent across risk groups, warfarin use increased as the CHA2DS2VASc score increased, and TSOAC use decreased with increasing CHA2DS2VASc score. A total of 34 % of study patients were prescribed inappropriate treatment upon discharge, based on national guidelines. This study demonstrated that patients admitted to our hospital were prescribed appropriate therapy the majority of the time; however, 34 % were prescribed inadequate antithrombotic therapy compared to current practice guidelines given their CHA2DS2VASc score. The development of an institution-specific guideline stratifying appropriate use of anticoagulation in this population may increase adherence to national guideline recommendations.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 05/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1223-5
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    ABSTRACT: IntroductionTranscatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has become an effective treatment option for high risk or prohibitive surgical risk symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) patients. Though TAVR has been widely adopted, complications are possible and management strategies are critical to procedural success. TAVR associated acute coronary artery occlusion is rare: in the largest case series, the incidence was 0.9 % [1] but potentially fatal. Herein, we describe three cases of acute coronary artery occlusion subsequent to Medtronic CoreValve implantation and potential management strategies that were employed successfully.Case 1A 78 year old Caucasian woman with severe symptomatic AS and high surgical risk was admitted for elective TAVR procedure. Her comorbidities included chronic diastolic heart failure, moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), polycythemia vera, ventral hernia and hypothyroidism. Her Society of Thoracic Surgeon’s (STS) mortality risk sc ...
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 04/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1222-6
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    ABSTRACT: Platelet aggregates play a crucial role in the immune defence mechanism against viruses. Increased levels of lipopolysaccharide have been reported in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals. Platelets are capable of interacting with bacterial LPS and subsequently forming platelet leukocyte aggregates (PLAs). This study aimed at determining the levels of circulating PLAs in treatment naïve HIV infected individuals and correlating them, with markers of immune activation, disease progression and platelet aggregation. Thirty-two HIV negative and 35 HIV positive individuals were recruited from a clinic in the Western Cape. Platelet monocyte and platelet neutrophil aggregates were measured using flow cytometry at baseline and were correlated with markers of platelet activation (CD62P); aggregation (CD36); monocyte and neutrophil activation (CD69); monocyte tissue factor expression (CD142); immune activation (CD38 on T+ cells); D-dimers (a marker of active coagulation); CD4 count and viral load. Platelet monocyte aggregates were also measured post stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. PMA levels were higher in HIV 25.26 (16.16-32.28) versus control 14.12 (8.36-18.83), p = 0.0001. PMAs correlated with %CD38/8 expression (r = 0.54624, p = 0.0155); CD4 count (r = -0.6964, p = 0.0039) viral load (r = 0.633, p < 0.009) and monocyte %CD69 expression (r = 0.757, p = 0.030). In addition the %PMAs correlated with platelet %CD36 (r = 0.606, p = 0.017). The HIV group showed increased levels of %CD62P 5.44 (2.72-11.87) versus control 1.15 (0.19-3.59), p < 0.0001; %CD36 22.53 (10.59-55.15) versus 11.01 (3.69-26.98), p = 0.0312 and tissue factor (CD142) MFI 4.84 (4.01-8.17) versus 1.74 (1.07-9.3), p = 0.0240. We describe increased levels of circulating PMAs which directly correlates with markers of immune activation, disease progression and platelet aggregation in HIV treatment naïve individuals.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 04/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1212-8
  • Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 04/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1217-3
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    ABSTRACT: Nine patients (average age 8.3 years, range 20 days to 17 years; average weight 31 kg, range 2.7-79 kg) with catheter-associated UE-DVT underwent upper extremity venous thrombolysis with the goal of access salvage. Catheter directed therapy with alteplase (tPA), balloon angioplasty, and mechanical thrombectomy was used in all cases. The mean total dose of TPA was 15 mg (range 1-40 mg). Venous access was ultimately preserved in all patients. No stents or superior vena cava filters were used. There was one episode of symptomatic clinically suspected pulmonary embolism managed by systemic tPA and heparin without long term sequaele. Mean imaging and clinical follow-up was 351 ± 208 and 613 ± 498 days respectively. Endovenous thrombolysis for catheter-associated upper-extremity DVT in children may be safe and effective and could be considered particularly in patients in whom long-term venous access is needed.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 04/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1209-3
  • Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 04/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1211-9
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    ABSTRACT: Inferior vena cava filter (IVC) placement is increasing significantly. However, due to low retrieval rates, many filters are left in place indefinitely thereby exposing patients to long-term filter-related complications. This study reports a series of three patients with IVC filter infection. Cases were identified during retrospective review of medical records of all patients undergoing an IVC filter insertion at a single tertiary care university hospital between 2009 and 2013. Clinical presentation, radiological features and management are discussed. Two patients presented within days of filter placement, while the other one presented 1 year later. In two patients, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) was found to be a sensitive method to diagnose IVC filter infection. Endovascular infection of IVC filter is a rare event. In patients with IVC filter in place and fever of unknown origin or persistent bacteremia, this complication should be suspected. FDG PET/CT has a diagnostic value in this challenging diagnosis.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 04/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1219-1
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    ABSTRACT: Cytoreductive therapy, with or without low-dose aspirin, is the mainstay of thrombotic risk reduction in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET), but the optimal choice of agent remains unclear. The aim of this study was to meta-analyze currently available data comparing anagrelide to hydroxyurea for reduction of rates of thrombosis, bleeding and death among patients with ET. A literature search for randomized, controlled trials comparing anagrelide to hydroxyurea among patients with ET revealed two published studies. Statistical analysis was performed using fixed effects meta-analysis. Rates of thrombosis were similar between patients treated with hydroxyurea vs anagrelide (RR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.64-1.16). Rates of major bleeding were lower in patients treated with hydroxyurea (RR 0.37, 95 % CI 0.18-0.75). Rates of progression to acute myeloid leukemia were not statistically different (RR 1.50, 95 % CI 0.43-5.29). The composite of thrombosis, major bleeding and death favored hydroxyurea (RR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.63-0.97). In conclusion, our analysis supports use of hydroxyurea as a first-line cytoreductive agent for patients with ET, based largely on decreased rates of major bleeding. Anagrelide appears to be equally effective for protection against thrombotic events and may be an appropriate alternative for patients who are intolerant of hydroxyurea.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 04/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1218-2
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a major cause of cardiovascular death. Thrombolytic therapy was shown to reduce mortality, especially in high risk patients. In elderly patients (>65 years old) with PE, thrombolytic therapy may be underused due to risk of hemorrhagic complications. In this study, we aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of thrombolytic therapy among elderly patients with PE. 363 patients (205 subjects in study group, 158 subjects in control group) who were admitted to our hospital with PE were enrolled to the study. The patients were divided into subgroups according to their age and treatment strategy. Mortality rates and bleeding complications according to TIMI bleeding criteria in 30 days and 1-year were analyzed. In elderly patients, total mortality (7.8 vs. 20.1 %, p = 0.05) and mortality at 1-year follow-up (1.9 vs. 12.9 %, p = 0.03) was significantly lower in patients who received thrombolytic treatment. Difference in total bleeding (9.8 vs. 4.5 %, p = 0.18) and major bleeding (3.9 vs. 0.6 %, p = 0.10) in thrombolytic and non-thrombolytic groups was non-significant. Thrombolytic therapy is associated with lower mortality and acceptable bleeding complication rates in PE patients older than 65 years old.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 04/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11239-015-1214-6