Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis (J Thromb Thrombolysis )

Publisher: LINK (Springer), Springer Verlag

Description

The Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis is a long-awaited resource for contemporary cardiologists hematologists and clinician-scientists actively involved in treatment decisions and clinical investigation of thrombotic disorders involving the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems. Its principal focus centers on the pathobiology of thrombosis and the use of anticoagulants platelet antagonists and thrombolytic agents in scientific investigation and patient care. The journal publishes original work that interlinks basic scienctific principles with clinical investigation thus creating a unique forum for interdisciplinary dialogue. Published works will advocate the development of solid platforms for planned clinical research and precise clinically-applicable benchwork. The Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 's comprehensive and interdisciplinary design will expand the reader's knowledge base and provide important insights for the most rapidly growing field in medicine. The journal seeks original manuscripts devoted to laboratory investigation and clinical studies. State-of-the-art reviews and editorials will be summoned by invitation. The journal will closely follow new trends on the cutting edge of the field and highlight drugs in the early stages of development which may warrant testing in the clinical arena. Updates of major national and international clinical trials will also be provided as will a forum of guidelines for interpreting the results of these trials from a patient care perspective. The Journal will publish an ongoing educational series of topics applicable to clinician scientists that will include such topics as: 'Seminars in Thrombosis Thromboysis and Vascular Biology' and a 6-part series on 'Hematology for the Cardiologist'. Manuscripts submitted must not be under consideration by an other journal and should not have been published elsewhere in similar form. All articles will be refereed by two qualified referees. All clinical trials being considered for publication will also be reviewed by a statistician. A response will be provided within four weeks of receipt.

  • Impact factor
    1.99
  • 5-year impact
    1.70
  • Cited half-life
    4.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.30
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.49
  • Website
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis website
  • Other titles
    Journal of thrombosis and thrombolysis (En ligne)
  • ISSN
    1573-742X
  • OCLC
    300185160
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors own final version only can be archived
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
    • On funders designated website/repository after 12 months at the funders request or as a result of legal obligation
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a 1.5-3.5-fold higher risk of thromboembolism when compared to the non-IBD population and the risk is much more prominent at the time of a flare. Arterial thromboembolism (ischemic stroke, focal white matter ischemia, cardiac ischemia, peripheral vascular disease and mesenteric ischemia) and venous thromboembolism (deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, retinal, hepatic, portal and mesenteric vein thromboses) belong to the group of underestimated extraintestinal complications in IBD patients, which are associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate (the overall mortality is as high as 25 % per episode). Thromboembolism occurs in younger patients compared to the non-IBD population and has a high recurrence rate. Multiple risk factors are involved in the etiopathogenesis, but the acquired ones play the key role. Congenital alterations do not occur more frequently in IBD patients when compared to the non-IBD population. Standardized guidelines for the prophylaxis of thromboembolism in IBD patients are urgently needed and these should be respected in clinical practice to avoid preventable morbidity and mortality.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In stroke patients higher levels of plasma fibrinogen are associated with increased risk of unfavourable functional outcome and short-term mortality. The aim of our study was to determine the relationship between plasma fibrinogen level and long-term risk of death in ischemic stroke patients. Seven hundred thirty six patients (median age 71; 47.1 % men) admitted to the stroke unit within 24 h after stroke were included. Plasma fibrinogen level was measured on day 1 of hospitalisation. Hyperfibrinogenemia was defined as plasma fibrinogen concentration >3.5 g/L. The maximal follow-up period was 84 months. Hyperfibrinogenemia was found in 25.0 % of patients. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, after adjustment for age, stroke severity, atrial fibrillation, smoking, white blood cell count, fever, in-hospital pneumonia and hyperglycemia, hyperfibrinogenemia was associated with increased case fatality (HR 1.71, 95 % CI 1.29-2.26, P < 0.01). Hyperfibrinogenemia predicts the long-term risk of death in ischemic stroke patients.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Dabigatran, a new direct thrombin inhibitor, achieves strong anticoagulation that is more predictable than warfarin. Nevertheless, a patient on dabigatran therapy (DT) may suffer from thrombotic or bleeding events. The routine monitoring of DT is not recommended, and standard coagulation tests are not sensitive enough for the assessment of DT activity. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical usefulness of the Hemoclot(®) Thrombin Inhibitor (HTI) assay in the assessment of dabigatran plasma levels in patients with non-valvular AF. Nineteen patients (12 men, 7 women) on DT were included in this preliminary prospective observational study. Dabigatran was administrated twice daily in a two dose regimens: 150 mg (5 patients) and 110 mg (14 patients). Blood samples were taken for the assessment of trough and peak levels of dabigatran. Dabigatran concentrations were measured with the HTI assay. The average dabigatran trough level was 69.3 ± 55.5 ng/ml and the average dabigatran peak level was 112.7 ± 66.6 ng/ml. The dabigatran trough plasma concentration was in the established reference range in 15 patients and the dabigatran peak plasma concentration was in the established reference range in 9 patients, respectively. Despite the fact that the activated partial thromboplastin and thrombin times were generally changed (prolonged), these tests failed to identify the patients with too low or too high dabigatran concentrations. The study confirmed the high sensitivity of the HTI assay for the assessment of dabigatran plasma levels. When compared to standard coagulation tests, the HTI is a more suitable assay for the monitoring of patients treated with dabigatran. Monitoring of DT may be beneficial in selected patients; however, further studies will be needed for the final clarification of this issue.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of obesity on the pharmacokinetics of enoxaparin is not clearly understood and traditional treatment doses in morbidly obese patients (body mass index [BMI] > 40 kg/m(2)) can lead to over anticoagulation. Our institution developed an inpatient protocol with reduced enoxaparin doses (0.75 mg/kg/dose based on actual body weight) for patients with a weight >200 kg or BMI > 40 kg/m(2). The primary objective was to determine if modified enoxaparin treatment doses would achieve therapeutic anti-Xa levels (goal range 0.6-1.0 IU/mL) in morbidly obese patients. Thirty-one patients were included in our study and had a median body weight of 138 kg (range 105-197) and a median BMI of 46.2 kg/m(2) (range 40.1-62). The initial peak anti-Xa levels were in therapeutic range in 15 of 31 patients (48 %) with an initial mean anti-Xa level of 0.92 IU/mL. Twenty-four patients (77 %) achieved therapeutic anti-Xa levels in goal range during their hospitalization, with a mean enoxaparin dose of 0.71 mg/kg. Bleeding and thrombotic events were minimal and all patients that achieved an anti-Xa level in goal range did so with a dose less than 1 mg/kg of enoxaparin.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: High on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) despite use of P2Y12 antagonists is associated with adverse cardiac events. The long-term variability in response to prasugrel and ticagrelor is unclear. Our aim was to assess residual platelet reactivity (PR) and rates of HTPR during treatment with prasugrel versus ticagrelor in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). 114 patients with MI treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were included. Sixty-two patients were treated with prasugrel (mean age 58 ± 8 years, 21 % women, 29 % diabetes), and 52 patients with ticagrelor (mean age 63 ± 9, 19 % women, 37 % diabetes). Patients were tested for PR at 2-4 days and 30 days post-PCI, using the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay and the multiple-electrode aggregometry. Our results show a higher residual PR in patients treated with prasugrel than those treated with ticagrelor (VerifyNow: 65.4 ± 60.6 vs. 26.0 ± 24.2 P2Y12 reaction units, p < 0.001 at 2-4 days, and 67.3 ± 62.5 vs. 21.1 ± 26.1, p < 0.001 at follow-up). HTPR rates were higher in the prasugrel group (8.1-11.3 % vs. none with ticagrelor in the early test, and 8.7-10.9 % vs. none with ticagrelor at follow-up). In conclusion, in patients with MI undergoing PCI, treatment with ticagrelor resulted in greater platelet inhibition and lower HTPR rates compared with prasugrel, up to 30 days after the event.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to assess deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (DVT/PE) recurrence rates and resource utilization among patients with an initial DVT or PE event across multiple payer perspectives. Retrospective analyses were performed using a software tool that analyzes health plan claims to evaluate treatment patterns and resource utilization for various cardiovascular conditions. Six databases were analyzed from three payer perspectives (Commercial, Medicare, and Medicaid). Patients were ≥18 years old with a primary diagnosis of DVT or PE associated with an inpatient and/or emergency room claim, had received an antithrombotic within 7 days before or 14 days after index, and had no diagnosis of atrial fibrillation during follow-up. Outcomes were assessed over a 1 year period following index. More PE patients were hospitalized for their index event than DVT patients (42-59 % DVT and 69-86 % PE) and had longer mean length of stay (2.35-2.95 days DVT and 3.26-3.76 days PE). Recurrent event rates among PE patients (12-32 %) were higher than those for DVT patients (6-16 %) across all payers. The highest rate of recurrence was observed among the Medicaid population [23 % overall (VTE); 16 % DVT; 32 % PE]. All-cause hospitalization in the year following their VTE episode occurred in 23-67 % DVT patients and 30-68 % PE patients. Medicaid had the highest proportion of patients with hospitalizations and ER visits. Recurrent VTE events and all-cause hospitalizations are relatively common, especially for patients who had a PE, and among those in the Medicaid payer population.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TK) includes a transient left ventricular dysfunction without obstructive coronary disease, sometimes after stressful situations with elevated cathecolamines. Since catecholamines activate platelets we aimed to study the platelet influence in a TK setting. We included 32 patients with a TK diagnosis, 13 with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and 18 healthy volunteers. Once consent informed was obtained, blood samples were extracted and processed (at admission and after 3 months follow-up). Clinical, ecg, echocardiographic and angiographic features were thoroughly recorded.Previous treatment before admission was similar between groups. No differences were observed in clinical features or any of the acute markers studied regarding platelet reactivity between TK compared to ACS. After follow-up, aggregation levels and platelet reactivity showed differences, mainly due to the antithrombotic therapy prescribed at discharge, but similar to volunteers. Circulating epinephrine during the acute phase was significantly higher in TK (p < 0.001). Patients with higher levels of epinephrine had elevated platelet activation and aggregation after 3 months. No differences were observed in Takotsubo acute platelet aggregation compared to patients with ACS, in spite of higher blood levels of adrenaline. Takotsubo patients had elevated platelet aggregation and activation compared with ACS patients at 3 months follow-up because they were less frequently on chronic clopidogrel and ASA. However, they had similar platelet aggregation and activation levels to healthy volunteers despite treatment with low-dose ASA. Takotsubo patients who had higher levels of adrenaline in the acute phase displayed increased platelet reactivity during follow-up.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Although new oral anticoagulants (NOAs) have been marketed in many countries, concern exists about the management of bleedings related to these drugs due to the lack of specific antidotes. The aim of our study was to report on real life management of NOAs-related life-threatening or major bleedings. We report data from consecutive cases of NOAs related major bleedings admitted to 4 hospitals since NOAs became marketed in Italy. We treated 8 patients, 4 males, with mean age 84 ± 7 years, 7 of whom were on dabigatran and one on rivaroxaban. The indication for NOA was atrial fibrillation. All bleedings were spontaneous and involving the gastro-intestinal tract. At the time of bleeding all patients had a drop in hemoglobin levels over 20 g/L. Creatinine clearance was ≤30 mL/min in 4 patients. All patients received general supportive measures, 4 of 8 patients were transfused with packed red cells and one patient received platelet transfusion. Three patients were treated with tranexamic acid and one patient on dabigatran received 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) with bleeding cessation, although coagulation parameters were not corrected. The median time for normalization of coagulation parameters was 3 days (range 1-6 days). All patients were discharged alive and NOAs were discontinued. In NOAs related major gastro-intestinal bleeding general supportive measures seem to be effective for the majority of patients. Despite promoting bleeding cessation, 4-factor PCC does not reverse abnormal coagulation parameters.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor,Time in therapeutic INR range (TTR) is the most accepted measure of the quality of oral anticoagulation (warfarin) management and it is well established that TTR varies substantially across geographic regions and across clinical settings [1]. In particular, it has been clearly demonstrated that TTR in specialty anticoagulation clinics is higher than TTR in primary care settings.Because specialty clinics typically utilize an algorithm for warfarin dose adjustments there is speculation that such algorithms are a major reason for the clinic’s superior TTR. Indeed, this journal just published an RCT by Nieuwlaat and colleagues evaluating whether the same algorithm used in the RE-LY trial, in the hands of primary care providers, would improve TTR [2]. Despite good concordance with the algorithm however, algorithm-guided warfarin management provided no improvement in TTR over usual primary care decision-making.Should this surprise us? The 2012 ACCP Guidelines for Antithrombotic
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We report a case of infective endocarditis (IE) involving the posterior mitral leaflet (PML) with calcific embolization in a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). Amongst HOCM patients with IE, the anterior mitral leaflet and basal septal myocardium are almost always involved due to the endocardial damage caused by recurrent outflow obstruction and valvular regurgitation. The management of our patient was complicated by moderate mitral stenosis, repeated calcific embolic strokes, dynamic left ventricular outflow track obstruction, and respiratory failure due to flash pulmonary edema. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of PML involvement in HOCM presenting in this manner.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Catheter-related right atrial thrombosis (CRAT) is an underreported and potentially life-threatening complication of central venous catheter in hemodialysis patients. The accurate incidence is unknown, with reported rates ranging from 2 to 12.8 % [1] in series, up to 29 % [2] in a postmortem prospective study, and high mortality rates (18 %) [1]. The optimal treatment for CRAT is controversial and nonsystematized, including anticoagulation, thrombolysis, and surgical thrombectomy. We report two cases of CRAT in dialysis patients, who underwent surgical thrombectomy. One case required reintervention because of recurrence, a first reported case in hemodialysis population.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The no-reflow phenomenon occurs when an epicardial coronary artery is reopened following myocardial infarction, but portions of the intramural microvasculature fail to reperfuse. One potential mechanism for this is the presence of fibrin tactoids. In addition, some recent studies have suggested that dabigatran treatment may be associated with increased incidence of myocardial infarction. Our aim was to investigate the effect on myocardial infarct size and no-reflow in an acute model of ischemia/reperfusion. Anesthetized, open-chest rabbits were randomly assigned to receive dabigatran (Dab, 0.5 mg/kg bolus + infusion, 0.15 mg/kg/h, IV, n = 11) or vehicle (Veh, n = 11) 15 m before a 30-m coronary artery occlusion and during 2.5 h of the 3 h reperfusion procedure. At the end of the reperfusion period, infarct size (% risk zone) and no-reflow defect were measured. The ischemic risk zone (% of left ventricle) was similar in groups, 24 % in Dab and 25 % in Veh. Necrosis was neither reduced nor increased by Dab treatment; expressed as a percentage of the risk region, infarct size was 30 ± 4 % in Dab and 28 ± 5 % in Veh, p = 0.76. The extent of no-reflow was comparable, expressed either as a percent of the risk region (19 ± 3 %, Dab and 18 ± 3 %, Veh) or as a percent of the necrotic zone (67 ± 8 % Dab and 65 ± 10 % Veh). Dab treatment had no effect on heart rate or blood pressure. Dabigatran treatment did not prevent or ameliorate the no-reflow phenomenon, suggesting that fibrin does not play a major role in the development of microvascular obstruction. Dabigatran did not exacerbate myocardial infarct size.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A 33-year-old Chinese man with 9-year history of Kimura's disease (KD) was admitted with a 1-month history of recurrent claudication. He did not have any clinical discomfort and had not taken any preventive medication in the past. He accepted percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and the pathologic diagnosis was reportedly consistent with necrotizing eosinophilic vasculitis. This is the rare reported case of KD associated necrotizing eosinophilic vasculitis presenting with recurrent peripheral arterial occlusive disease and the difficulties encountered in establishing an accurate diagnosis with unusual presentations. This case also highlights the possibility of recurrent complications without aggressive medical treatment in such unusual eosinophilic disorders.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: D-Dimer is a biomarker of fibrin formation and degradation. While a D-dimer within normal limits is used to rule out the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism among patients with a low clinical probability of venous thromboembolism (VTE), the prognostic association of an elevated D-dimer with adverse outcomes has received far less emphasis. An elevated D-dimer is independently associated with an increased risk for incident VTE, recurrent VTE, and mortality. An elevated D-dimer is an independent correlate of increased mortality and subsequent VTE across a broad variety of disease states. Therefore, medically ill subjects in whom the D-dimer is elevated constitute a high risk subgroup in which the prospective evaluation of the efficacy and safety of antithrombotic therapy is warranted.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Data on the frequency of anti-platelet factor 4/heparin (PF4/H) antibodies and their association with outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU) patients are sparse. In this prospective, observational study we screened 320 consecutive surgical/medical ICU patients for anti-PF4/H antibodies by enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) for immunoglobulin (Ig)G/A/M separately and heparin-induced platelet activation assay (HIPA) at ICU admission (=baseline), day 6, and day 10. HIPA-positive patients were additionally tested by serotonin-release assay (SRA). Patients tested positive by day 10: for anti-PF4/H-IgG = 17.2 % and for anti-PF4/H-IgM = 42.1 %. Within the first 10 ICU days, platelet counts decreased to <100 Gpt/L in 27.8 % patients. However, only seven patients (2.2 %) experienced a drop in the platelet count ≥50 % beginning after the fourth ICU day. These included the only two patients (0.6 %; 95 % confidence interval 0.08-2.2 %) with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Only strong reactions in the HIPA were reproducible by SRA. This study confirms that testing for anti-PF4/H IgG antibodies should be restricted to ICU-patients who develop a platelet count decrease of >50 % that begins after day four of heparin treatment (which may have started before ICU admission). Among patients testing positive by IgG-specific EIA a functional platelet activation assay should be performed (regarding only strong reactions as positive).
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: There is a strong relationship between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic intermittent hypoxia, inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction may constitute etiologic mechanisms, linking OSAS to CVD. Inflammation play an important role in the development of CVD. Platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) is a new biomarker showing inflammation. No previous study has ever investigated the association between PLR, CVD and OSAS severity in patients with OSAS. This study was designed to investigate the association between PLR and CVD in patients with OSAS, and relationship between severity of OSAS, polysomnographic parameters and PLR. This was a cohort study in which patients who had undergone a full night polysomnoraphy for diagnosis of OSA were recruited. Patients were divided according to their apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) scores into OSAS negative (Group 1: AHI < 5), mild (Group 2: AHI, 5-15), moderate (Group 3:AHI,15-30), and severe OSAS (Group 4: AHI > 30) groups. The presence of heart failure, coronary artery disease or arrhythmia was defined as CVD. A total of 424 patients were included in this study. There were 57, 93, 82, and 192 patients in Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. PLR were significantly different between groups (Group 1: 87.38; Group 2: 95.07; Group 3: 97.01, Group 4: 126.9, P < 0.05). PLR were significantly correlated with AHI, oxygen desaturation index, average and minimum O2 saturation values (P < 0.05). Values of PLR were significantly higher in patients with CVD compared with those without. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that PLR is an independent predictor of CVD. PLR cut-off value for demonstrating the presence of CVD is higher than 108.56. In the light oh findings, PLR is strongly associated with the severity of OSAS and cardiovascular disease in OSAS patients. PLR might be used as a biomarker to predict CVD in OSAS patients.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The benefit of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) has been questioned for patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) in cases of acute ischemic stroke (IS). Our objective was to analyze the differences in outcome according to prior diagnosis of DM and the use or not of IVT. Observational study with inclusion of consecutive IS patients admitted to an stroke unit. Demographic data, vascular risk factors, comorbidity, stroke severity and 3-month follow-up outcome (modified Rankin Scale) were compared according to prior diagnosis of DM and the use or not of IVT. A total of 1,139 IS patients were admitted; 283 (24.8 %) patients had a diagnosis of DM, and 261 were IVT treated (23.2 % of the group without DM and 21.9 % of the DM group). The IVT-treated patients with DM were older, had more comorbidities and had higher glucose levels on admission than those without DM and than IVT-treated patients. No significant differences in stroke severity, hemorrhagic transformation, in-hospital mortality or outcome at 3 months were found. The logistic regression analysis showed that stroke severity was associated with a higher risk of a poor outcome in IVT-treated patients, with no significant effect from DM after adjustment for confounders. Moreover, IVT was independently associated with a lower risk of poor outcome in DM patients (OR 0.49; 95 % CI 0.31-0.76; P = .002). DM patients should not be excluded from IVT, because DM is not associated with a poor outcome after IVT and this treatment is clearly beneficial for DM patients as compared with DM patients not treated with IVT.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Transition from the hospital into the outpatient setting is a critical event for the appropriate provision of VTE prophylaxis. Data for this transition for the situation in Germany is scant. This was a retrospective, observational study in patients receiving in-hospital thromboprophylaxis and discharged with or without a recommendation to continue. Patient with previous thromboembolism were excluded. A total of 3,211 patients were identified by 518 physicians of which 2,853 had all data available for the present analysis; mean patient's age was 57.4 ± 17.5 (SD) years, 48.2 % were male and bodyweight was 79.8 ± 16.1 kg. During hospitalization 95.5 % of surgical and 84.0 % of medical patients received any thromboprophylaxis, the mean hospital duration being 12.7 ± 20.3 days. Surgical patients had high, medium and low risk in 53.8, 37.1 and 9.1 %, respectively. Medical patients had high, medium and low risk in 78.8, 19.8 and 1.4 %. A hospital recommendation to continue thromboprophylaxis was given to 84.6 % (95 % CI 83.1-85.9 %) of surgical and 64.9 % (95 % CI 59.1-70.6 %) of medical patients and implemented in 96.6 and 94.3 %, respectively. On the other hand, in patients without a respective hospital recommendation (15.4 % of surgical and 35.1 % of medical patients), thromboprophylaxis was continued in 65.3 % of surgical and 73.1 % of medical patients because of high risk. Our data illustrate acceptable rates of prophylaxis in surgical and medical patients in Germany. As the results show, it is essential that not only hospital physicians are aware of the actual risk at discharge, but office based physicians assess thromboembolic risk.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2014;

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