Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation (J Occup Rehabil)

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Journal description

The Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation is an international forum for the publication of peer-reviewed original papers on the rehabilitation of the disabled worker. The journal offers investigations of clinical and basic research; theoretical formulations; literature reviews; case studies; discussions of public policy issues and book reviews. Papers, both clinical and theoretical, derive from a broad array of fields: rehabilitation medicine, physical and occupational therapy, health psychology, orthopedics, neurology, and social work, ergonomics, biomedical and rehabilitation engineering, disability management, law and more. A single multidisciplinary source for information on work disability rehabilitation, the Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation helps to advance the scientific understanding, management, and prevention of work disability.

Current impact factor: 2.80

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 2.96
Cited half-life 5.60
Immediacy index 0.24
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.70
Website Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation website
Other titles Journal of occupational rehabilitation (Online), Journal of occupational rehabilitation
ISSN 1573-3688
OCLC 44554065
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective Many workers suffer from musculoskeletal disorders. In France, occupational physicians are able to set job aptitude restrictions obliging employers to adapt the worker's job. The present study explored the impact of job restriction from the point of view of the employees' supervisors. Methods A qualitative study was conducted in 3 public hospitals. 12 focus groups were organized, involving 61 charge nurses and head nurses supervising 1 or more workers restricted for heavy lifting or repetitive movements. Discussions were recorded for qualitative thematic analysis. Results Charge and head nurses complained that aptitude restrictions were insufficiently precise, could not be respected and failed to mention residual capability. A context of personnel cuts, absenteeism and productivity demands entailed a need for polyvalence and reorganization threatening the permanence of adapted jobs. Job restrictions had several negative consequences for the charge and head nurses, including overwork, increased conflict, and feelings of isolation and organizational injustice. Conclusion Protecting the individual interests of workers with health issues may infringe on the interests of their supervisors and colleagues, whose perception of organizational justice may go some way to explaining the support or rejection they show toward restricted workers. This paradox should be explicitly explored and discussed.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 09/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10926-015-9609-y
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Traumatic brain injury (TBI) produces broad-reaching and often persistent challenges that impact an individual's ability to engage in vocational productivity. Return to work (RTW) rates after TBI are markedly poor and the efficacy of current TBI vocational rehabilitation (VR) practices is unclear. Positive psychology, the practice of fostering positive emotions and traits, offers novel approaches that might enhance the effectiveness of existing TBI VR practices. This article assesses the potential relevance of positive psychology principles and practices to VR for clients recovering from TBI. Methods A literature search was conducted using the database resources of a large university hospital, including PubMed, ProQuest, PsycINFO, and Web of Science. Content from this search was reviewed and synthesized, including literature on VR for TBI, vocational applications of positive psychology, and general rehabilitation applications of positive psychology. Results Ten guiding principles for positively-informed TBI VR are proposed. Specific positive psychology measures and interventions for improving emotional, social, and cognitive functioning are identified and discussed as they might be applied to TBI VR. Conclusions Theoretically, positive psychology principles and practices appear to be well suited to improving VR outcomes for individuals with TBI. In addition to examining the feasibility of incorporating positive psychology techniques, future research should examine the impact of positive psychology interventions on RTW rates, job satisfaction, job stability, and other vocational outcomes. With additional investigation, positive psychology measures and interventions may prove to be a beneficial compliment to existing VR practices.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 09/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10926-015-9608-z
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The main aim of this study was to assess changes in perceived demand, control and support at work of neck and back pain patients over 1 year. We also hypothesised that perceived changes in demand, control and support at work were associated with clinical improvement, reduced fear-avoidance beliefs and successful return to work. Methods Four hundred and five sick-listed patients referred to secondary care with neck or back pain were originally included in an interventional study. Of these, two hundred and twenty-six patients reported perceived psychosocial work factors at both baseline and 1-year follow-up, and they were later included in this prospective study. Changes in demand, control and support dimensions were measured by a total of nine variables. Results At the group level, no significant differences were found among the measured subscales. At the individual level, the regression analyses showed that decreases in fear-avoidance beliefs about work were consistently related to decreases in demand and increases in control, whereas decreases in disability, anxiety and depression were related to increases in support subscales. Conclusions The perception of demand, control and support appear to be stable over 1 year in patients with neck and back pain, despite marked improvement in pain and disability. Disability, anxiety, depression and fear-avoidance beliefs about work were significantly associated with the perception of the work environment, whereas neck and back pain were not.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 08/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10926-015-9602-5
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose A number of key issues related to employment of persons with disabilities demand ongoing and effective lines of inquiry. There is evidence, however, that work researchers struggle with recruitment of participants, and that this may limit the types and appropriateness of methods selected. This two phase study sought to identify the nature of recruitment challenges in workplace-based disability research, and to identify strategies for addressing identified barriers. Methods The first phase of this study was a scoping review of the literature to identify the study designs and approaches frequently used in this field of inquiry, and the success of the various recruitment methods in use. In the second phase, we used qualitative methods to explore with employers and other stakeholders in the field their perceived challenges related to participating in disability-related research, and approaches that might address these. Results The most frequently used recruitment methods identified in the literature were non-probability approaches for qualitative studies, and sampling from existing worker databases for survey research. Struggles in participant recruitment were evidenced by the use of multiple recruitment strategies, and heavy reliance on convenience sampling. Employers cited a number of barriers to participation, including time pressures, fear of legal reprisal, and perceived lack of relevance to the organization. Conclusions Participant recruitment in disability-related research is a concern, particularly in studies that require collection of new data from organizations and individuals, and where large probability samples and/or stratified or purposeful samples are desirable. A number of strategies may contribute to improved success, including development of participatory research models that will enhance benefits and perceived benefits of workplace involvement.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 07/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10926-015-9594-1
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives Lack of work-participation and early disability pensions (DP's) among young adults are increasing public health problems in most western European countries. The present study investigated determinants of early DP in young adults in vocational rehabilitation. Methods Data from 928 young adults (aged 18-40 years) attending a vocational rehabilitation program was linked to DP's recorded in the Norwegian Labor and Welfare Organization registries (1992-2010) and later compared to a group of 65 employees (workers). We used logistic regression to estimate the odds ratio for entitlement to DP following rehabilitation, adjusting for socio-demographical, psychosocial and health-behavior factors. Results Significant differences in socio-demographical, psychosocial and health-behavior factors were found between the rehabilitation group and workers. A total of 60 individuals (6.5 %) were granted a DP during follow-up. Increase in age, teenage parenthood, single status, as well as low education level and not being employed were found to be the strongest independent determinants of DP. Conclusion Poor social relations (being lone), early childbearing and weak connection to working life contributed to increase in risk of DP's among young adults in vocational rehabilitation, also after adjusting for education level. These findings are important in the prevention of early disability retirements among young adults and should be considered in the development of targeted interventions aimed at individuals particularly at risk of not being integrated into future work lives.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 07/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10926-015-9590-5
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Few studies have explored measures of function across a range of health outcomes in a general working population. Using four upper extremity (UE) case definitions from the scientific literature, we described the performance of functional measures of work, activities of daily living, and overall health. Methods A sample of 573 workers completed several functional measures: modified recall versions of the QuickDASH, Levine Functional Status Scale (FSS), DASH Work module (DASH-W), and standard SF-8 physical component score. We determined case status based on four UE case definitions: (1) UE symptoms, (2) UE musculoskeletal disorders (MSD), (3) carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and (4) work limitations due to UE symptoms. We calculated effect sizes for each case definition to show the magnitude of the differences that were detected between cases and non-cases for each case definition on each functional measure. Sensitivity and specificity analyses showed how well each measure identified functional impairments across the UE case definitions. Results All measures discriminated between cases and non-cases for each case definition with the largest effect sizes for CTS and work limitations, particularly for the modified FSS and DASH-W measures. Specificity was high and sensitivity was low for outcomes of UE symptoms and UE MSD in all measures. Sensitivity was high for CTS and work limitations. Conclusions Functional measures developed specifically for use in clinical, treatment-seeking populations may identify mild levels of impairment in relatively healthy, active working populations, but measures performed better among workers with CTS or those reporting limitations at work.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 06/2015; DOI:10.1007/s10926-015-9591-4