Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation (J Occup Rehabil )

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Description

Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation publishes original research that advances the scientific understanding management treatment and prevention of work disability associated with occupational musculoskeletal problems. This timely publication consolidates a large body of original data to offer a truly multidisciplinary perspective on work disability. Peer-reviewed articles cover: clinical studies ñ original research on a broad array of clinical issues; review articles ñ critical reviews related to evaluation treatment and prevention; case studies ñ descriptions of a single case or small series of cases that describe innovative approaches to occupational musculoskeletal disorders; basic research ñ original research from the basic science fields relevant to work-related disability; book reviews up-to-date reviews of major books related to occupational rehabilitation.

  • Impact factor
    2.80
  • 5-year impact
    2.96
  • Cited half-life
    5.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.24
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.70
  • Website
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation website
  • Other titles
    Journal of occupational rehabilitation (Online), Journal of occupational rehabilitation
  • ISSN
    1573-3688
  • OCLC
    44554065
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors own final version only can be archived
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
    • On funders designated website/repository after 12 months at the funders request or as a result of legal obligation
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose Despite extensive evidence for the treatment effectiveness of interdisciplinary functional restoration (FR) for chronic disabling occupational musculoskeletal disorders (CDOMD), there is little documentation on the cost-effectiveness of early rehabilitation using FR. Methods A total of 1,119 CDOMD patients were classified according to duration of disability on FR entry, corresponding to early rehabilitation (ER: 4-8 months of disability, N = 373), intermediate duration (ID: 9-18 months, N = 373), and delayed rehabilitation (DR: >18 months, N = 373). Groups were matched on sex, age, ethnicity, and injured musculoskeletal region. One-year post-rehabilitation outcomes included return-to-work, work retention and healthcare utilization. Economic analyses included a cost-effectiveness analysis of the FR program, and estimation of the total cost-of-illness. Results At 1-year post-rehabilitation, all groups were comparable on return-to-work (overall 88 %), work retention (overall 80 %), and additional healthcare utilization (overall, 2.2 % of patients received re-operations/new surgeries, 2 visits to new healthcare provider). Savings of up to 64 % in medical costs, and up to 80 % in disability benefits and productivity losses was associated with the ER group. The cost of rehabilitation was also up to 56 % lower when administered early. Overall, ER resulted in estimated cost savings of up to 72 % (or almost $170,000 per claim). Conclusions Duration of disability does not negatively impact objective work or healthcare utilization outcomes following interdisciplinary FR. However, early rehabilitation is more likely to be a cost-effective solution compared to cases that progress >8 months and receiving FR as a treatment of "last resort".
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of Waddell signs (WS) on Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE) in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain (CNSLBP) undergoing fitness for work evaluation. If an effect is observed, the secondary objective is to report performance of patients without WS in a standardized 1 day FCE protocol. Methods Survey of patients with CNSLBP as their primary complaint, referred for fitness for work evaluation, age between 20 and 60 years. Main outcome measures were WS and performance during manual handling assessed with lifting from floor to waist, waist to crown, horizontal and one handed carry; grip strength with Jamar hand held Dynamometer; ambulation with stair climbing and six minute walking test; work postures with elevated work, forward bend standing, kneeling, and sitting. Results 145 male with a mean age of 44.5 years (±10.1), and 53 females with a mean age of 43.6 years (±11.0) were included. Mean days off work were in male 658 (±1,056) and in female 642 (±886). 33 % of all patients presented positive WS. FCE performance in male and female patients with positive and negative WS differed significantly in all comparisons except grip strength of the dominant hand and sitting in female. Performance of patients with negative WS indicated a mean physical capacity corresponding to lightmedium work in females and medium work in males for both age groups. Conclusions WS should be assessed for interpretation of FCE results. Despite long work absence, patients with CNSLBP with negative WS demonstrated a physical capacity corresponding to substantial physical work demands.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Many injuries experienced by soldiers can be attributed to the occupational loads they are required to carry. Purpose The aim of this study was to determine whether contemporary military load carriage is a source of injuries to Australian Regular Army soldiers and to profile these injuries. Methods The Australian Defence Force 'Occupational Health, Safety and Compensation Analysis and Reporting' database was searched to identify all reported injuries sustained during load carriage events. Key search terms were employed and narrative description fields were interrogated to increase data accuracy. Results A total of 1,954 injury records were extracted from the database. Of these, 404 injuries were attributed to load carriage. The majority of these load carriage injuries involved either the lower limb or back, with bones and joints accounting for the most frequently reported body structures to be injured. Field activities were the leading activities being performed at the time that load carriage injuries occurred, and muscular stress was identified as the mechanism of injury for over half of reported load carriage injuries. Conclusion This study suggests that load carriage is a substantial source of injury risk to Australian Army soldiers. Physical training may fail to adequately prepare soldiers for load carriage tasks during field training exercises.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purposes To assess predictors of presenteeism (reduced productivity at work) and activity impairment outside work in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Methods Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to study predictors of presenteeism and activity impairment in 1,253 patients with SpA based on a 2.5 year follow-up questionnaire. The Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI) questionnaire was used as main outcome. Age, gender, lifestyle factors, subgroups, disease duration, and different patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) were studied as possible predictors. The association between presenteeism and WPAI activity impairment outside work was assessed. Results Out of 1,253 patients, 757 reported being in work and of these 720 responded to the WPAI questionnaire. The mean (confidence interval, CI) reported presenteeism was 25 % (23-27 %) and mean activity impairment 33 % (31-35 %) (0-100 %, 0 = no reduction). Significant predictors of presenteeism and activity impairment at follow-up (controlled for gender, age, spondyloarthritis subgroups and presenteeism at baseline) were presenteeism at baseline, poor quality of life, worse disease activity, decreased physical function, lower self-efficacy pain and symptom, higher scores of anxiety, depression, smoking and low education level, and for activity impairment also female sex. There was a strong association between presenteeism and activity impairment outside work (OR 16.7; 95 % CI 11.6-24.3; p < 0.001). Conclusions Presenteeism and activity impairment were not only predicted by presenteeism at baseline, but also by several PROMs commonly used in clinical rheumatology practice. Impaired activity outside work could indicate problems also at work suggesting why both areas need to be addressed in the clinical situation.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose To validate Dutch prognostic models including age, self-rated health and prior sickness absence (SA) for ability to predict high SA in Danish eldercare. The added value of work environment variables to the models' risk discrimination was also investigated. Methods 2,562 municipal eldercare workers (95 % women) participated in the Working in Eldercare Survey. Predictor variables were measured by questionnaire at baseline in 2005. Prognostic models were validated for predictions of high (≥30) SA days and high (≥3) SA episodes retrieved from employer records during 1-year follow-up. The accuracy of predictions was assessed by calibration graphs and the ability of the models to discriminate between high- and low-risk workers was investigated by ROC-analysis. The added value of work environment variables was measured with Integrated Discrimination Improvement (IDI). Results 1,930 workers had complete data for analysis. The models underestimated the risk of high SA in eldercare workers and the SA episodes model had to be re-calibrated to the Danish data. Discrimination was practically useful for the re-calibrated SA episodes model, but not the SA days model. Physical workload improved the SA days model (IDI = 0.40; 95 % CI 0.19-0.60) and psychosocial work factors, particularly the quality of leadership (IDI = 0.70; 95 % CI 053-0.86) improved the SA episodes model. Conclusions The prognostic model predicting high SA days showed poor performance even after physical workload was added. The prognostic model predicting high SA episodes could be used to identify high-risk workers, especially when psychosocial work factors are added as predictor variables.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Return to work (RTW) is beneficial for cancer survivors, employers and society. However, little is known about predictors of RTW in the military environment. Methods A cohort of 194 Royal Air Force (RAF) personnel aged 18-58 who survived primary cancer treatment between 2001 and 2011 were followed up for 18 months. Information was obtained from occupational health and primary care records. Personal, occupational and clinical predictors of RTW were identified by Cox proportional hazards regression. Results The median sickness absence before RTW was 107 days. Six months after diagnosis 54 % of participants had RTW, and reached 80 % by 12 months. Time taken to RTW was predicted by age at diagnosis, rank, trade group, pre-diagnosis sickness absence, site of cancer, treatment modality, and prognosis. RTW at 18 months were predicted by higher rank (HR = 2.31; 95 % CI 1.46-3.65), and having melanoma (9.75; 4.97-19.13). Those receiving chemotherapy were significantly less likely to have RTW compared to other treatment modalities (0.18; 0.10-0.32). Conclusions Rank, cancer diagnostic group, and treatment modality are the most important predictors of RTW in cancer survivors in the RAF. These predictors can be used to inform rehabilitation programmes and decisions on RTW.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The objective of this study was to design and operationalize shared decision making (SDM) rehabilitation model for worker rehabilitation programs. SDM has previously been shown to improve decision outcomes in patient-health care professional relationships. To date, SDM has not yet been adapted to work rehabilitation, although it could be a valuable approach to better understand and agree on return-to-work decisions. Methods We designed a preliminary model for return-to-work decisions for workers suffering from pain due to musculoskeletal injuries. We submitted the preliminary model and a questionnaire to expert health care professionals. Using the Technique for Research of Information by Animation of a Group of Experts method, a group consensus process was used to discuss and refine the experts' responses to operationalize a model adapted for rehabilitation. Results Eleven occupational therapists (three were clinical coordinators) and four psychologists participated in three group consensus sessions. The final version of the model included one general longitudinal objective (the maintenance of a working alliance and assuring mutual comprehension among all stakeholders), and 11 specific objectives: establishing a working alliance, seven in the deliberation phase of the SDM process, and three in the implementation of the decision. Participants also reached consensus on between 1 and 8 indicators per objective. Conclusion We developed and operationalized an SDM rehabilitation model intended for a return-to-work implementation plan. The next step will be to document its feasibility among the main stakeholders (employer, union, insurer and worker) taking part in decisions about return to work.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose To evaluate the interventional capacity of problem based method groups (PBM) regarding mental health and work ability compared to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for persons on sick leave due to common mental disorders. Methods In a randomised controlled design the experimental group received PBM and the control group received CBT. Outcomes were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Stress and Crisis Inventory 93 (SCI-93) and the Dialogue about Working Ability instrument (DOA). Results Twenty-two participants in the PBM group and 28 in the CBT group completed intervention. Both groups showed significant lower scores on the two HADS subscales. Regarding stress the PBM group showed significant decrease in one (out of three) subscales of SCI-93. The CBT group showed significant decrease on all subscales of SCI-93. Regarding work ability the PBM group showed significant higher scores on one of five subscales of DOA. The CBT group showed significant higher scores on four of five subscales of DOA. Between groups there were significant differences to the favour of CBT on one of two subscales of HADS, all three subscales of SCI-93 and on two of the five subscales of DOA. Conclusion PBM seem to be able to reduce anxiety- and depression symptoms. CBT showed to be superior to PBM in reducing symptoms in all aspects of mental health, except for anxiety, in which they seem equally effective. Regarding work ability CBT showed to be superior, with significant effect on more aspects compared to PBM.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Survey (SF-36) is a widely used measure of health-related quality of life and normative reference values have been published for the general population of several countries. Since injured workers often experience pain, disability and other health challenges, we evaluated SF-36 reference values for Canadian workers' compensation claimants undergoing rehabilitation. Methods Descriptive cross-sectional design. Data were gathered as part of a study aimed at developing a tool for selecting rehabilitation programs. Data were available on a wide variety of measures, including the SF-36. We calculated age- and sex-adjusted reference values, and stratified analyses based on type of rehabilitation, employment status and diagnostic group. Results Data were available on 5,622 claimants undergoing rehabilitation. Claimants reported significant limitations on all SF-36 scales, but were especially limited on the Role Emotional and Bodily Pain scales (~3 standard deviations below typical Canadian norms). Unemployed, middle-aged claimants undergoing chronic pain programs reported the lowest health status, but SF-36 scores varied minimally across diagnoses. Conclusions Claimant scores on the SF-36 were below population norms across all health scales and differed depending on age, employment status and type of rehabilitation. These data will be useful for assessing the health status of injured workers and evaluating the effect of rehabilitation interventions.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Somatoform disorders (physical symptoms without medical explanation that cause dysfunction) are prevalent in the occupational health (OH) care setting and are associated with functional impairment and absenteeism. Availability of psychometric instruments aimed at assessing somatoform disorders is limited. In the OH setting, so far only the Patient-Health-Questionnaire 15 has been validated as screener for somatoform disorder, and has been shown to have moderate validity. The Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) is frequently used in the OH setting but the Somatization subscale is not validated yet. The aim of this study is to validate the 4DSQ Somatization subscale as screener for DSM-IV somatoform disorder in the OH setting by using the MINI interview as gold standard. Methods Employees absent from work due to physical symptoms, for a period longer than 6 weeks and shorter than 2 years, were asked to participate in this study. They filled out the 4DSQ and underwent a MINI interview by telephone for DSM-IV classification. Specificity and sensitivity scores were calculated for all possible cut-off scores and a receiver operator curve was computed for the Somatization subscale. 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) were calculated for sensitivity and specificity. Results The Somatization subscale of the 4DSQ has an optimal cut point of 9, with specificity and sensitivity equal to 64.3 % [95 % CI (53.6; 73.7 %)] and 60.9 % [95 % CI (40.8; 77.8 %)], respectively. Receiver operator curves showed an area under the curve equal to 0.61 [SE = 0.07; 95 % CI (0.48; 0.75)] for the Somatization subscale of the 4DSQ. Conclusion The 4DSQ Somatization subscale is a questionnaire of moderate sensitivity and specificity.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Expectations strongly influence future employment outcomes and social networks seem to mediate employment success of young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The aim of this study is to examine the expectations of young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities from special needs education, their parents and their school teachers regarding future work and the extent to which these expectations predict work outcome. Methods Data on 341 young adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities, coming from special needs education, aged 17-20 years, and with an ability to work according to the Social Security Institute were examined. Results The school teacher's expectation was the only perspective that significantly predicted entering competitive employment, with a complementary effect of the expectation of parents and a small additional effect of the expectation of the young adult. Conclusions Expectations of school teachers and parents are valuable in predicting work outcome. Therefore, it is important for professionals working with the young adult in the transition from school to work to incorporate the knowledge of school teachers and parents regarding the abilities of the young adult to enter competitive employment as a valuable source of information.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Social support has been identified as a key factor in facilitating better health outcomes following injury. However, there is limited research on the role of social support in recovery from musculoskeletal injury (MSI), the leading cause of morbidity and disability in the world. The aim of this study is to review the extent to which family and work-related social support (e.g. co-workers, supervisors) has been identified as a factor in the outcomes (physical, psychological, economic) of individuals with MSI. Methods Eight online databases were searched for observational studies reporting findings on family and work-related social support in populations with MSI. Data extraction, quality assessment and a systematic critical synthesis were carried out on included studies. Results Fourteen relevant articles were identified. The majority of the studies focused on social support from co-workers or supervisors (n = 11), while three studies focused on social support from the family. Overall, the evidence for the relation between work-related support and MSI outcomes was inconclusive. Similarly, there was limited and inconclusive evidence to demonstrate a relationship between family support and MSI outcomes. Conclusions The results of this review are inconclusive. Further research is needed to understand the role of social support in rehabilitation efforts following MSI. Recommendations for future research are provided.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The aim of this paper is to develop and test a model of direct and indirect relationships among individual psychosocial predictors of return-to-work (RTW) outcomes following the onset of low back pain (LBP). Methods We utilize secondary analysis of a larger study of adults seeking treatment for work-related LBP with recent onset. In total, 241 participants who completed a baseline survey, a short follow-up survey, and a longer follow-up survey after 3 months were included in our analyses. The participants were required to have LBP with onset of less than 14 days, be 18 years or older, and be fluent in English or Spanish. The analyses utilized structural equation models to test the direct and indirect relationships among the variables and RTW outcomes at 3 months. Results Our results indicated a good fit for our model (χ2 = 69.59, df = 45, p < .05; RMSEA = .05; CFI = .95; WRMR = .61). Pain, catastrophizing, fear-avoidance beliefs, organizational support, and RTW confidence were all found to have indirect relationships with the outcomes. RTW confidence and RTW expectations were found to have direct relationships with the outcomes. Conclusions The process of returning to work after an episode of LBP is a complex process involving many interrelated factors. Understanding the relationships among critical individual factors in the RTW process may be important for the treatment and rehabilitation of those with LBP. Results suggest that if injured workers are struggling with fear avoidance, pain catastrophizing and confidence issues, they might benefit from the application of cognitive behavioral therapy techniques.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Disability discrimination legislation means that employees with a disability or mental illness are legally entitled to reasonable workplace accommodations that enable them to work effectively and safely. This scoping review aims to investigate the types of workplace accommodations provided for people with mental illness, and their costs and benefits. Methods A literature search was conducted using five electronic databases. Peer reviewed research articles published between 1993 and June 2013 were included in this scoping review and their quality was assessed. Opinion papers, reports, and case descriptions were excluded. Results Nine studies explored workplace accommodations for people with mental illness. The most commonly reported work-related accommodations were flexible scheduling/reduced hours, modified training and supervision, and modified job duties/descriptions. The least common type of accommodation was physical modification to the workplace. For employees with persistent mental illness who were accessing a supported employment agency, the majority of accommodations related to support from the job coach or employment specialist, such as facilitating communication with the employer during hiring or on the job. The quality of the studies varied considerably and the benefits of the accommodations are not yet well documented. There is limited evidence that a larger number of workplace accommodations are associated with longer job tenure. Conclusions Workplace accommodations appear to be important to support employees with mental illness, but more accessible information about how disability discrimination legislation applies to this population is needed. Future research should address the implementation and effectiveness of mental health-related workplace accommodations.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Functional evaluation of upper limb is not only based on clinical findings but requires self-administered questionnaires to address patients' perspective. The Hand Function Sort (HFS©) was only validated in English. The aim of this study was the French cross cultural adaptation and validation of the HFS© (HFS-F). Methods 150 patients with various upper limbs impairments were recruited in a rehabilitation center. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation were made according to international guidelines. Construct validity was estimated through correlations with Disabilities Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, SF-36 mental component summary (MCS),SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) and pain intensity. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's α and test-retest reliability by intraclass correlation. Results Cronbach's α was 0.98, test-retest reliability was excellent at 0.921 (95 % CI 0.871-0.971) same as original HFS©. Correlations with DASH were-0.779 (95 % CI -0.847 to -0.685); with SF 36 PCS 0.452 (95 % CI 0.276-0.599); with pain -0.247 (95 % CI -0.429 to -0.041); with SF 36 MCS 0.242 (95 % CI 0.042-0.422). There were no floor or ceiling effects. Conclusions The HFS-F has the same good psychometric properties as the original HFS© (internal consistency, test retest reliability, convergent validity with DASH, divergent validity with SF-36 MCS, and no floor or ceiling effects). The convergent validity with SF-36 PCS was poor; we found no correlation with pain. The HFS-F could be used with confidence in a population of working patients. Other studies are necessary to study its psychometric properties in other populations.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Work-related injury is a major public health problem and a worker's recovery can be shaped by their interactions with employers, healthcare providers and the workers' compensation system. Most research on the effects of compensation has concentrated on examining outcomes rather than considering the compensation process itself. There has been little attention paid to the interactions between stakeholders and only recently has the client's view been considered as worthy of investigation. This systematic review aimed to identify and synthesize findings from peer reviewed qualitative studies that investigated injured workers interactions with insurers in workers' compensation systems. Method A search of six electronic library databases revealed 1,006 articles. After screening for relevance, 18 articles were read in full and a search of those bibliographies revealed a further nine relevant articles. Quality assessment of the 27 studies resulted in a final 13 articles of medium and high quality being retained for data extraction. Results Included studies focused mainly on experiences of injured workers, many of whom had long term claims. Findings were synthesized using a meta-ethnographic approach. Six themes were identified which characterised the interactions between insurers and injured workers. The majority of interactions were negative and resulted in considerable psychosocial consequences for injured workers. Positive interactions were less frequently reported and included respectful, understanding and supportive communication and efficient service from insurers. Conclusion Findings from this synthesis support the growing consensus that involvement in compensation systems contributes to poorer outcomes for claimants. Interactions between insurers and injured workers were interwoven in cyclical and pathogenic relationships, which influence the development of secondary injury in the form of psychosocial consequences instead of fostering recovery of injured workers. This review suggests that further research is required to investigate positive interactions and identify mechanisms to better support and prevent secondary psychosocial harm to injured workers.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose To assess issues that contribute to the Quality of Working Life (QWL) of employees with a chronic physical disease. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted using the databases PubMed, PsycINFO and EMBASE. Experiences and perceptions during the working life of employees with a chronic physical disease were extracted and synthesized into issues that contributed to their QWL. We organized these synthesized QWL issues into higher order themes and categories with qualitative data analysis software. Results From a total of 4,044 articles identified by the search, 61 articles were included. Data extraction and data synthesis resulted in an overview of 73 QWL issues that were classified into 30 themes. The following five categories of themes were identified: (1) job characteristics with issues such as job flexibility and work-site access; (2) the social structure and environment containing issues about disclosure, discrimination, misunderstanding, and awareness by employers or colleagues; (3) organizational characteristics with issues such as requesting work accommodations; (4) individual work perceptions including issues about enjoyment and evaluating work or life priorities; and (5) effect of the disease and treatment including issues about cognitive and physical health and work ability. Conclusion This systematic review offers an extensive overview of issues that might contribute to the QWL of employees with a chronic physical disease. This overview may function as a starting point for occupational support, such as monitoring and evaluating the QWL of employees with a chronic physical disease during return-to-work and work continuation processes.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Pain is a complex phenomenon not easily discerned from psychological, social, and environmental characteristics and is an oft cited barrier to return to work for people experiencing low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate a path-analytic mediation model to examine how motivational enhancement physiotherapy, which incorporates tenets of motivational interviewing, improves physical functioning of patients with chronic LBP. Methods Seventy-six patients with chronic LBP were recruited from the outpatient physiotherapy department of a government hospital in Hong Kong. Results The re-specified path-analytic model fit the data very well, χ (2)(3, N = 76) = 3.86, p = .57; comparative fit index = 1.00; and the root mean square error of approximation = 0.00. Specifically, results indicated that (a) using motivational interviewing techniques in physiotherapy was associated with increased working alliance with patients, (b) working alliance increased patients' outcome expectancy and (c) greater outcome expectancy resulted in a reduction of subjective pain intensity and improvement in physical functioning. Change in pain intensity also directly influenced improvement in physical functioning. Conclusions The effect of motivational enhancement therapy on physical functioning can be explained by social-cognitive factors such as motivation, outcome expectancy, and working alliance. The use of motivational interviewing techniques to increase outcome expectancy of patients and improve working alliance could further strengthen the impact of physiotherapy on rehabilitation outcomes of patients with chronic LBP.
    Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 05/2014;

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