Journal of Behavioral Medicine (J Behav Med )

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Description

The Journal of Behavioral Medicine is a broadly conceived interdisciplinary publication devoted to furthering our understanding of physical health and illness through the knowledge and techniques of behavioral science. Application of this knowledge to prevention treatment and rehabilitation is also a major function of the journal which includes papers from all disciplines engaged in behavioral medicine research: psychology psychiatry sociology epidemiology anthropology health economics and biostatistics. Examples of typical research areas include: the study of appetitive disorders (alcoholism smoking obesity) that serve as physical risk factors; adherence to medical regimen and health maintenance behavior; pain self-regulation therapies and biofeedback for somatic disorders; sociocultural influences on health and illness; and brain-behavioral relationships that influence physiological function.

  • Impact factor
    3.10
  • 5-year impact
    4.30
  • Cited half-life
    8.90
  • Immediacy index
    0.35
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    1.50
  • Website
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine website
  • ISSN
    1573-3521
  • OCLC
    67297924
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors own final version only can be archived
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
    • On funders designated website/repository after 12 months at the funders request or as a result of legal obligation
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The psychological flexibility model appears to be useful for organizing research into chronic pain. One component of the model is called ‘‘cognitive defusion.’’ A process referred to as decentering, measured by the Experiences Questionnaire (EQ), appears similar to cognitive defusion. The purpose of this study is to extend previous investigations of the EQ, to evaluate its factor structure, and examine both indirect and direct roles for decentering in relation to key clinical outcomes. 352 people seeking pain treatment participated in this study. All completed the EQ and standard measures of daily functioning, including emotional functioning. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation models (SEMs) were utilized to examine the factor structure of the EQ and evaluate the role of decentering in relation to outcomes. In CFA the overall fit of the EQ items to a twofactor model, specifying decentering and rumination factors, was poor. Separate models of decentering (a higher order model consisting of two sub-factors; cognitive defusion and self-a-context) and rumination, including reduced item sets, yielded good statistical fits. Analyses of these factors showed expected relations with emotional and social functioning but not with physical functioning. SEM revealed that both decentering and rumination have direct effects on functioning and indirect effects through measures of acceptance. A shortened 12-item measure of decentering warrants further study. Combined models of acceptance and the type of cognitive-defusion-related process reflected in decentering may improve our understanding social and emotional functioning in relation to chronic pain.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The present study examined associations between parenting and perceived health in adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD) using a longitudinal trajectory approach. Adolescents with CHD were selected from the database of pediatric and congenital cardiology of the University Hospitals Leuven. A total of 429 adolescents (M age = 16 at T1) participated in the present study, comprising four measurement waves spanning approximately 3 years. Latent class growth analysis was used to identify trajectory classes of parenting and perceived health. Whereas adolescents from democratic households reported the most favorable health outcomes, adolescents from authoritarian, overprotective, and psychologically controlling families (all characterized by relatively high levels of psychological control) showed an increased risk for poor perceived health over time. Hence, the present study found substantial developmental associations between parenting and perceived health in adolescents with CHD. Future research should investigate whether working on the parent-adolescent relationship can foster patients' health.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We tested whether cardiovascular stress responsiveness is elevated in individuals experiencing chronic pain in a large general population sample. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were assessed at rest, during the cold pressor test, and during subsequent recovery in 554 individuals reporting daily chronic pain and 3,082 individuals free of chronic pain. After correcting for potential confounds, differences as a function of chronic pain status were noted for only 5 of 23 cardiovascular outcomes despite very high statistical power. Compared to the pain-free group, the chronic pain group displayed higher baseline HR/mean arterial pressure (MAP) ratio (p = .03), greater systolic BP (SBP) reactivity during the cold pressor test (p = .04), and higher HR/MAP ratio (p = .047) and significantly less SBP (p = .017) and MAP (p = .041) return to baseline during recovery. Findings suggest that changes in cardiovascular stress responsiveness associated with chronic pain are of limited clinical significance and unlikely to contribute to increased cardiovascular risk in the chronic pain population.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study's purpose was to identify psychosocial predictors of weight loss maintenance in a multi-site clinical trial, following a group-based weight loss program. Participants (N = 1025) were predominately women (63 %) and 38 % were Black (mean age = 55.6 years; SD = 8.7). At 12 months, higher SF-36 mental health composite scores were associated with less weight regain (p < .01). For Black participants, an interaction existed between race and friends' encouragement for exercise, where higher exercise encouragement was related to more weight regain (p < .05). At 30 months, friends' encouragement for healthy eating was associated with more weight regain (p < .05), whereas higher SF-36 mental health composite scores were related to less weight regain (p < .0001). Perceived stress and select health-related quality of life indices were associated with weight regain; this relationship varied across gender, race, and treatment conditions. Temporal changes in these variables should be investigated for their impact on weight maintenance.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Mental stress evokes several physiological responses such as the acceleration of heart rate, increase of electrodermal activity and the release of adrenaline. Moreover, physiological stress responses interact with emotional and behavioral stress responses. In the present study we provide evidence that viscero-sensory feedback from the heart (cardiac perception) is an important factor modulating emotional and cognitive stress responses. In our study, we compared participants with high versus low cardiac perception using a computerized mental stress task, in which they had to respond to rapidly presented visual and acoustic stimuli. Additionally, we assessed physiological responses (heart rate, skin conductance). Participants high in cardiac perception reported more negative emotions and showed worse task performance under the stressor than participants low in cardiac perception. These results were not moderated by physiological responses. We conclude that cardiac perception modulates stress responses by intensifying negative emotions and by impairing cognitive performance.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Approaching the inverse association between perceived discrimination and close relationship functioning from a stress and coping framework, we propose and test a novel model incorporating psychological (emotion dysregulation) and physiological (chronic inflammation) pathways. Analyses of data from a sample of African American participants (N = 592) enrolled in the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study revealed support for the proposed model. Specifically, results from structural equation modeling analyses showed that perceived discrimination was indirectly associated with increased emotion dysregulation (venting and denial) through stressor appraisals and directly associated with increased inflammation (interluekin-6, e-selectin and c-reactive protein). Furthermore, relationship strain with family, friends and spouses was associated with greater levels of emotion dysregulation and chronic inflammation. Overall, the proposed model fit the data well and provides support for new avenues of research on the social, psychological and physiological correlates of perceived discrimination and close relationship functioning. To conclude, evidence for the proposed biopsychosocial model is summarized and directions for future research on these topics are discussed.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The present study experimentally tested the cross-stressor adaptation hypothesis by examining whether endurance exercise training leads to reductions in the physiological stress response to a psychosocial stressor. We randomly assigned 149 healthy men to a 12-week exercise training, relaxation training, or a wait list control group. Before and after intervention we assessed the groups' physical fitness (lactate testing) and compared their physiological stress responses to the Trier Social Stress Test for Groups in terms of salivary free cortisol, heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV); the final sample consisted of 96 subjects. As hypothesized, the exercise training significantly improved fitness and reduced stress reactivity in all three parameters; however, it only improved stress recovery in terms of HR. The relaxation program reduced only cortisol, but not HR or HRV reactivity; no changes emerged for the control group. The findings suggest that the cross-stressor adaptation hypothesis is valid for cardiovascular as well as endocrine stress reactivity.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Using a nationally representative sample of couples aged 51+ in the United States (N = 1,923 couples), the current study investigated whether both partners' perceptions of relationship support and strain are associated with an individual's self-rated health and functional limitations. The sample had an average age of 67.17 years (SD = 9.0; range 50-97). Actor-Partner Interdependence Models adjusting for couple interdependencies were applied using multilevel models. After accounting for age, education, gender, race, and couple differences in length of marriage, results indicate that individual perceptions of support were significantly associated with higher self-rated health and fewer functional limitations. These individual-level benefits increased if the spouse also perceived positive support and low strain. Finally, the negative association of an individual's perceived support on functional limitations was greater in those with a spouse reporting low levels of perceived strain. Findings are discussed relative to theory on behavioral and psychological pathways between partners' perceptions of support and health.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated spouse health behavior outcomes from a randomized controlled trial of a spouse-assisted lifestyle intervention to reduce patient low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and improve patient health behaviors. Participants were 251 spouses of patients from the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center randomized to intervention or usual care. The intervention comprised 9 monthly telephone calls to patients and spouses. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 6 and 11 months. At 11 months, there were no differences in spouse outcomes between intervention and usual care groups for moderate intensity physical activity (i.e., frequency, duration) or dietary intake (i.e., total calories, total fat, percentage of calories from total fat, saturated fat, percentage of calories from saturated fat, cholesterol, fiber). To improve spouse outcomes, couple interventions may need to include spouse behavior change goals and reciprocal support between patients and spouses and consider the need for improvement in spouse outcomes.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Low-income, urban African American (AA) girls are at heightened risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and violence exposure may be an important risk factor. AA girls (N = 177) from low-income communities in Chicago completed a 2-year longitudinal study of HIV-risk behavior involving five waves of data collection (ages 12-16 at baseline) and a sixth wave (ages 14-22) assessing lifetime trauma and victimization history. Childhood exposure to violence (CEV) represented reports of physical, sexual, or witnessed violence before age 12. Latent growth curve analysis examined CEV as a covariate of sexual experience, number of sexual partners, and inconsistent condom use trajectories. CEV was associated with greater sexual risk, although the pattern differed across the three outcomes. Overall, findings emphasize the need for early interventions to reduce sexual risk among low-income urban girls who have experienced violence. Efforts to address or prevent violence exposure may also reduce rates of STIs in this population.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence of skin cancer among U.S. Hispanics increased 1.3 % annually from 1992 to 2008. However, little research has focused on skin cancer prevention among the rapidly growing Hispanic population. In this study, we examined theory-driven, psychosocial correlates of sun protection behaviors in a population-based sample of 787 Hispanic adults (49.6 % female, mean age = 41.0 years) residing in five southern or western U.S. states. Participants completed an English- or Spanish-language online survey in September 2011. The outcomes of focus were sunscreen use, shade seeking, and use of sun protective clothing. The correlates included suntan benefits, sun protection benefits and barriers, skin color preference, perceived natural skin protection, photo-aging concerns, perceived skin cancer risk, skin cancer worry, skin cancer fatalism, and sun protection descriptive norms. Results of multiple linear regression analyses revealed the following: sun protection barriers were negatively associated with each outcome; descriptive norms were positively associated with each outcome; perceived natural skin protection was inversely associated with sunscreen use; skin cancer worry was positively associated with shade seeking and use of sun protective clothing; skin cancer fatalism was negatively associated with shade seeking; and skin color preference was negatively associated with use of sun protective clothing. A number of additional statistically significant associations were identified in bivariate correlation analyses. This study informs the potential content of interventions to promote engagement in sun protection behaviors among U.S. Hispanics.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Social support has been shown to be a protective resource for mental health among chronically ill adults and caregiver populations. However, to date no known studies have quantitatively explored the relationship between social support and depression among women caring for children in HIV-endemic Southern Africa, although they represent a high risk population for mental health conditions. Using data from a household survey with 2,199 adult female caregivers of children, living in two resource-deprived high HIV-prevalence South African communities, we conducted hierarchical logistic regression analysis with interaction terms to assess whether social support had a main effect or stress-buffering effect on depression. Findings provide evidence of stress-buffering of non-HIV-related chronic illness, but not HIV-related illness. Results reinforce the importance of social support for the mental health of chronically ill caregivers, and suggest that factors related to the specific nature of HIV/AIDS may be hindering the potential stress-buffering effects of social support among people living with the disease. Implications for future research and interventions are discussed.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The present exploratory study examined the role of acculturation in the perception of the risks of smoking following a smoking cessation induction intervention among Latino caregivers of children with asthma. The sample consisted of 131 Latino smokers (72.9 % female; 18.3 % born in the U.S.) who were caregivers of a child with asthma. Caregivers were randomized to one of two smoking cessation interventions that were part of a home-based asthma program. Self-report measures of risk-perception were assessed at baseline, end of treatment (2 months after baseline), and 2- and 3-months post-treatment. At baseline, caregivers, regardless of level of acculturation, reported moderate to high levels of concern about the effects of secondhand smoke on their child's health as well as perceived risk regarding the effect of smoking on their own health. However, caregivers who were low in acculturation had a greater increase in concern about the effects of smoking on their child from pre-to post treatment compared to those who were high in acculturation (p = .001). Lastly, level of acculturation moderated the association between caregivers' concern about smoking on their child's health and their motivation to quit smoking (p < .05), but not cessation rates or reduced secondhand smoke exposure (p > .05). Specifically, motivation to quit at 3 months was greater for those with low acculturation. Though exploratory, these findings suggest that risk perception may be more easily influenced in low versus high acculturated populations and this should be considered in the design of clinical interventions and potentially mass media campaigns seeking to influence risk of caregiver behavior on child health with ethnic and racial minorities.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Building on the Cognitive-Social Health Information-Processing model, this paper provides a theoretically guided review of monitoring (i.e., attend to and amplify) cancer-related threats. Specifically, the goals of the review are to examine whether individuals high on monitoring are characterized by specific cognitive, affective, and behavioral responses to cancer-related health threats than individuals low on monitoring and the implications of these cognitive-affective responses for patient-centered outcomes, including patient-physician communication, decision-making and the development of interventions to promote adherence and adjustment. A total of 74 reports were found, based on 63 studies, 13 of which were intervention studies. The results suggest that although individuals high on monitoring are more knowledgeable about health threats, they are less satisfied with the information provided. Further, they tend to be characterized by greater perceived risk, more negative beliefs, and greater value of health-related information and experience more negative affective outcomes. Finally, individuals high on monitoring tend to be more demanding of the health providers in terms of desire for more information and emotional support, are more assertive during decision-making discussions, and subsequently experience more decisional regret. Psychoeducational interventions improve outcomes when the level and type of information provided is consistent with the individual's monitoring style and the demands of the specific health threat. Implications for patient-centered outcomes, in terms of tailoring of interventions, patient-provider communication, and decision-making, are discussed.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Decisions to undergo invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures can be anxiety provoking. Individuals receive information about these procedures in one of three modalities: written text, audio (verbal description), or video. We examined whether modality influences emotional responses and testing decisions, and whether trait anxiety, a disposition linked with heightened sensitivity to threatening information, moderates these effects. New Zealand adults (N = 176) completed a trait anxiety measure before random allocation to view a text, audio, or video message about amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling. Participants completed measures of child related worry, anticipated emotional distress, anticipated coping efficacy, perceived likelihood of miscarriage, and testing interest. High-anxious individuals reported greater distress and lower coping efficacy in response to the video message compared to the audio message. They also reported greater miscarriage likelihood in response to the video message compared to the text message. These findings suggest that use of video, assumed to be most informative for educating patients, could induce greater distress about prenatal testing in individuals prone to anxiety.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The present study examined the relationships of positive and negative types of religious coping with depression and quality of life, and the mediating role of benefit finding in the link between religious coping and psychological outcomes among 198 individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The results of multiple hierarchical analyses revealed that negative religious coping was significantly associated with a high level of depressive symptoms and a low level of quality of life, controlling for demographic and clinical variables. On the other hand, positive religious coping was significantly associated with positive domains of outcome measures such as positive affect and life satisfaction, but not with overall depressive symptoms or quality of life. Tests of mediation analyses showed that benefit finding fully mediated the relationship between positive religious coping and the positive sub-domains of psychological outcomes. The importance of investigating both positive and negative types of religious coping in their relationships with psychological adaptation in people with HIV was discussed, as well as the significance of benefit finding in understanding the link between religious coping and psychological outcomes.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Occasional cannabis use has been associated with increased antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and relief of HIV symptoms, while heavy use has been associated with low ART adherence and negative psychological symptoms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate differences between non-cannabis use (NC), non-dependent cannabis use (C), and dependent use (CD) in terms of ART adherence and HIV symptoms/ART side effects. A cross-sectional sample of 180 HIV+ individuals (78.3 % male) completed measures of substance use and psychopathology, medication adherence, and HIV symptoms/ART side effects. Adherence was also measured via pill count, viral load, and CD4 count. Results indicated that the CD group reported lower adherence and greater HIV symptoms/ART side effects than the other two groups, with no differences observed between NC and C groups. There is a clinical need to address dependent cannabis use among those prescribed ART. Further examination is needed to ascertain the functions of cannabis use among individuals with HIV.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 01/2014; 37(1):1-10.
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    ABSTRACT: Adolescents experience elevated depressive symptoms which health promotion interventions may reduce. This study investigated whether HIV prevention trial participation decreased depressive symptoms among African-American female adolescents. Adolescents (N = 701; M age = 17.6) first received a group-delivered HIV prevention intervention and then either 12 sexual health (intervention condition) or 12 general health (comparison condition) phone counseling contacts over 24 months. ACASI assessments were conducted at baseline, and at 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-months post-baseline. Linear generalized estimating equations were used to detect percent relative change in depressive symptoms. Participants reported a 2.7 % decrease in depressive symptoms (p = 0.001) at each assessment. Intervention participants endorsed an additional 3.6 % decrease in depressive symptoms (p = 0.058). Trial participation was associated with reduced depressive symptomatology, particularly among those receiving personalized sexual health counseling. HIV prevention interventions may benefit from incorporating additional content to address adolescents' mental health needs.
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 12/2013;