International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education (Int J Sci Math Educ )

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Description

The objective of this journal is to publish original, fully peer-reviewed articles on a variety of topics and research methods in both science and mathematics education. The journal welcomes articles that address common issues in mathematics and science education and cross-curricular dimensions more widely. Specific attention will be paid to manuscripts written by authors whose native language is not English and the editors have made arrangements for support in re-writing where appropriate. Contemporary educators highlight the importance of viewing knowledge as context-oriented and not limited to one domain. This concurs with current curriculum reforms worldwide for interdisciplinary and integrated curricula. Modern educational practice also focuses on the use of new technology in assisting instruction which may be easily implemented into such an integrated curriculum. The journal welcomes studies that explore science and mathematics education from different cultural perspectives.

  • Impact factor
    0.53
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    4.30
  • Immediacy index
    0.05
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education website
  • Other titles
    International journal of science and mathematics education (Online), IJSME
  • ISSN
    1571-0068
  • OCLC
    53191065
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Underrepresentation of women of color in science majors and careers continues to be a concern for many science educators. Despite being the fastest growing population of college students, women of color have made insufficient gains in college science degree attainment. Sixteen women of color who were undergraduates majoring in a science field participated in three-part, in-depth interviews. Prominent factors associated with persistence as a science major included academic preparation for college science, faculty support, important school science experiences, family support, science support programs, altruistic beliefs, and the importance of religion. This study examined the data using current persistence theories as well as exploring the role of cultural and social capital as sources for support and motivation.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Common core standards, interdisciplinary education, and discipline-specific literacy are common international education reforms. The constructive–interpretative language arts pairs (speaking–listening, writing–reading, representing–viewing) and the communication, construction, and persuasion functions of language are central in these movements. This research developed and validated a communication progression in science education for elementary–secondary schooling in Taiwan. The framework for the communication progression was based on relevant literature, international curricula, and focus-group deliberations; it consisted of three dimensions: presentation, reaction, and negotiation. Delphi deliberations with questionnaires were applied to experts to evaluate the theoretical considerations and to experienced science teachers to evaluate the practical considerations. Results confirmed the importance of communications in science learning and the developmental nature of communications across elementary, middle, and secondary schools and validated the proposed framework and progression. The communication progression has application to other international education systems as they address common core standards and curricula in language and science.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In line with a current global trend, junior secondary science education in Bangladesh aims to provide science education for all students to enable them to use their science learning in everyday life. This aim is consistent with the call for scientific literacy, which argues for engaging students with science in everyday life. This paper illustrates Bangladeshi science teachers’ perspectives of scientific literacy along with their views on teaching practices. Participating teachers held a range of perspectives of scientific literacy, including some naive perspectives. The paper also reports that whilst teachers’ verbalised practices in relation to their emphasis on engaging students with science in everyday life follows the emphases as required in teaching for promoting scientific literacy, their assessment practices may not be useful to promote it. The discussion explores the meaning of these findings and provides implications for school science educational practice in Bangladesh.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 10/2014; 12(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Three teaching methods were compared in this study, namely a Cognitive Conflict Management Module (CCM) that is infused into Cognitive Acceleration through Science Education (CASE), (Module A) CASE without CCM (Module B) and a conventional teaching method. This study employed a pre- and post-test quasi-experimental design using non-equivalent control groups. The design involved 130 participants from Form 2 (Grade 7) in a Malaysian secondary school. The cognitive level of all participants was classified as non-formal operational on the pre-test and were allocated to one of the four intact groups: experimental group 1, EP1 experienced Module A, experimental group, and EP2 experienced Module B, while the others were divided between two control groups. The impact of the three teaching methods on the level of cognitive development and science achievement were observed after a 20-week intervention. Data were analysed using multivariate analysis of variance/multivariate analysis of covariance, analysis of covariance and a paired-samples t test. It is hoped that this study can contribute to knowledge in the field of cognitive intervention and cognitive conflict strategy. The findings show that a high dose of cognitive intervention in CASE activities within a short period has an effect on the levels of students’ cognitive development, standard science achievement and constructive cognitive conflict.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 10/2014; 12(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: What does it take to change a school’s mathematics achievement profile from low to one that is proficient and advanced? Is this transformed achievement profile sustainable? Such is the story presented here, in this three-phase case study of a K-8 urban charter school’s mathematics program. The first phase discusses the school’s mathematics program as it existed in 2006. The second phase discusses the contents and interventions implemented which transformed the student achievement scores over a period of 3 years (2006–2009) from low achieving to proficient and advanced. The third phase is a follow-up mixed-methods investigation that was conducted to determine whether the achievement was sustainable and how the program changed. The interventions designed and implemented over the initial 3-year period are discussed, as are the findings of the follow-up study. This is discussed with reference to impacting change in student achievement and its relative significance for future work.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 10/2014; 12(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study explored environmental worldviews of selected undergraduate students in Taiwan and located the associations of these worldviews with science. The “environment” is represented as nature or the natural world, as opposed to the social and spiritual world. The participants were undergraduate students (14 science and 15 nonscience majors) enrolled in a general science course at a southern Taiwanese university. A questionnaire and individual interviews were conducted in parallel to elicit in depth the students’ ideas/beliefs about nature, such as, to what construes nature, how it works, and how humans relate to nature. The responses were analyzed using a phenomenographic approach to emphasize the qualitative variation of the students’ views. The key findings based on their relations to science and science education were the following: (1) Most students seemed to immediately relate the topic of nature to science and thus sought to explain nature from a scientific perspective, yet their understanding of scientific concepts or metaphors, such as the balance of nature, was problematic; (2) a value-free perspective is evident among some students in viewing human-induced natural crises: What we should do is merely look at facts and let science tell us what we should and should not do. (3) The students generally expressed trust in science and technology and believed it to be the key to improving the condition of nature as well as human life.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 10/2014; 12(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: School mathematics tends to have developed from the major cultures of Asia, the Mediterranean and Europe. However, indigenous cultures in particular may have distinctly different systematic ways of referring to space and thinking mathematically about spatial activity. Their approaches are based on the close link between the environment and cultural activity. The affinity to place strengthens the efficient, abstract, mathematical system behind the reference and its connection to the real world of place and a holistic worldview. This paper sets out to present an overview of various approaches to aspects of space and geometry by drawing on linguistic and cultural literature, my collaborative research in Papua New Guinea, and from personal communications with indigenous colleagues in Australia and elsewhere. This diversity provides a challenge by which teachers can deconstruct their thinking about mathematics and subsequently to review the content of teaching and to be more responsive to the diversity of cultural backgrounds of students. To assist with recognising ecocultural mathematics on space and geometry, 4 principles are established and discussed on language structures, reference lines and points, measures of space and worldviews and interpretations of space as place.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 08/2014; 12(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper, I discuss Universal Basic Education (UBE) in relation to the teaching and learning of mathematics in Southern Africa. I present the status of UBE for all countries in the region and then use 3 selected examples: Botswana, Malawi, and Zambia, to illustrate the provision of mathematics in the general framework of UBE in the countries. I draw from results of SACMEQ evaluations to compare the 3 countries’ quality of primary education and also the mathematical achievement of learners. According to the evaluations, countries that have better age-appropriate enrolment and provide a better quality of primary education seem to have better mathematical achievement than countries that have less age-appropriate enrolment and less quality of primary education. While this might seem obvious, it is important to note because of the many challenges that some Southern African countries are facing in their efforts in providing quality mathematics education to all.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 08/2014; 12(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to explore whether a representational approach could impact on the scores that measure students’ understanding of mechanics and their ability to reason. The sample consisted of 24 students who were undergraduate, preservice physics teachers in the State University of Malang, Indonesia. The students were asked to represent a claim, provide evidence for it, and then, after further representational manipulations, refinement, discussion, and critical thought, to reflect on and confirm or modify their original case. Data analysis was based on the pretest–posttest scores and students’ responses to relevant phenomena during the course. The results showed that students’ reasoning ability significantly improved with a d-effect size of 2.58 for the technical aspects and 2.51 for the conceptual validity aspects, with the average normalized gain being 0.62 (upper–medium) for the two aspects. Students’ conceptual understanding of mechanics significantly improved with a d-effect size of about 2.50 and an average normalized gain of 0.63. Students’ competence in mechanics shifted significantly from an under competent level to mastery level. This paper addresses statistically previously untested issues in learning mechanics through a representational approach and does this in a culture that is quite different from what has been researched so far using student-generated representational learning as a reasoning tool for understanding and reasoning.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 08/2014; 12(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between pre-service science teachers’ Field Dependent or Field Independent (FD/FI) cognitive styles and the application of degrees of naive impetus theory. The sample consisted of 122 pre-service science teachers (97 females and 25 males) who were enrolled in the Introductory Physics course required by the Science Education program. Data were collected in two successive years, after the completion of the required Introductory Physics undergraduate courses, in 2008 and 2009. The Group Embedded Figure Test and Impetus Theory Application Test (a two-tier-type test) were administered to assess the FD/FI tendency of students and to determine the degree students applied the naïve impetus theory, respectively. Initial results showed that a majority of students had made use of the native impetus theory repeatedly. The results also indicated that the degree to which students applied the naïve impetus theory was statistically related to their FD/FI cognitive styles. The findings of this research showed that there existed a statistically significant difference between the FI and FD students’ degree of applying the naïve impetus theory in favor of FI students. However, the test score gap between FI and FD students remained almost constant regardless of the testing instruments utilized in this study.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 08/2014; 12(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study explored learning competency based on the Indonesian National Examination focusing especially on chemistry performance and the circumstances of senior high school students and teachers in rural areas of Simeulue Island, Indonesia. The National Examination total score and chemistry score for students in rural areas were consistently lower than students in urban areas during 2008–2010. The majority of rural students were failing to master key chemistry concepts. Their low performance on laboratory-based questions appeared to indicate that the associated practical work was not done as part of the chemistry courses. Some chemistry topics were not taught due to insufficient time, student weaknesses, insufficient textbooks, and other reasons. The issues of low competency of teachers, poverty for the majority of students, low enrollment in schools, and low competition among students in these rural senior high schools appeared to be common problems across rural settings. The local government has recommended providing a consolidated rural high school with qualified chemistry teachers, laboratories, and transportation to address factors negatively influencing student achievement. Furthermore, local rural school officials need to recruit and retain qualified teachers in these isolated areas, provide effective textbooks and instructional resources, and facilitate the professional development of chemistry teachers.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 08/2014; 12(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Tracing the path from a numerical Riemann sum approximating the area under a curve to a definite integral representing the precise area in various texts and online presentations, we found 3 semiotic registers that are used: the geometric register, the numerical register, and the symbolic register. The symbolic register had 3 representations: an expanded sum, a sum in sigma notation, and the definite integral. Reviewing the same texts, we found that in the presentation of double and triple integrals, not a single textbook continues to present the numerical register and the expanded sum representation of the symbolic register. They are implied and the expectation appears to be that students no longer need them. The omission of these representations is quite ubiquitous and correspondingly affects millions of students. Materials that present the missing numerical register representation and the expanded sum representation of the symbolic register throughout topics associated with double and triple integrals have been created. This paper presents the results of a clinical study on the improvement of student comprehension of multivariable integral topics when these representations are included.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 08/2014; 12(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We conducted a methodological review of articles using the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) or Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) data published by the SSCI-indexed science education journals, such as the International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, the International Journal of Science Education, the Journal of Research in Science Teaching, and Science Education, from 1996 to 2013. A total of 51 empirical articles from 8 journals were identified as the sample for this study. These articles were analyzed in terms of the 2 essential statistical techniques, sampling weights and design effects, used to analyze the international large-scale assessment (ILSA) data. The study also summarized the most commonly used quantitative methods for analyzing PISA and TIMSS data in these articles. The results indicate that the weights and design effects, essential adjustments for analyzing large-scale data, were reported in less than half of the studies. Suggestions regarding the use of appropriate techniques and reporting as well as data analysis methods are made for science education researchers who use ILSA data in their research.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 06/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-based assessment for elementary school students’ listening comprehension of science talk within an inquiry-oriented environment. The development procedure had 3 steps: a literature review to define the framework of the test, collecting and identifying key constructs of science talk, and developing and verifying an instrument that measured listening comprehension of science talk. The Science Listening Comprehension Test (SLCT), consisting of 35 multiple-choice items, was developed for 3 science inquiry components: identifying questions, designing methods and presenting evidence, and drawing evidence-based conclusions. Students from grades 4 and 6 (N = 1,080) were recruited and selected through cluster sampling. The SLCT’s validity, reliability, and item parameters were found to be reasonable. Grade-related improvement in listening comprehension of science talk was observed, no significant gender difference was observed, and students’ listening comprehension of science talk was predictable with prior scientific knowledge and language ability measures. Instructional implications were discussed, and future research was outlined.
    International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 06/2014;