Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery (Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg )

Publisher: European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery; European Society for Cardiovascular Surgery

Description

Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery (ICVTS) provides a new platform for the publication of short reports in the field. Basically, ICVTS is conceived as virtual conference relying on both modern media and open discussion. For this purpose, all accepted reports will be posted immediately online on this web site. An electronic, moderated discussion will be open for 28 days through a corresponding link. After closure of the discussion period, the reports pre-published on the web, as well as a selection of the contributions for the moderated discussion, will be published in the ICVTS quarterly with traditional paper format.ICVTS welcomes reports on all aspects of surgery of the heart, great vessels and the chest, including new ideas, short communications, work in progress, follow-up studies, research protocols, registry information, nomenclature, case reports, images, videos, and last but not least, reports on negative experiences.

  • Impact factor
    1.11
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    3.20
  • Immediacy index
    0.35
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery website
  • Other titles
    Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery (Online), ICVTS
  • ISSN
    1569-9293
  • OCLC
    53098131
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Remote ischaemia preconditioning (RIPC) induces some protection against heart ischaemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. However, many different methods were tried in the past, and no consensus exists. The aim of this study was to compare femoral and aortic ischaemia preconditioning on cardiac markers and on heart injury after IR.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Primary cardiac extrasceletal osteosarcomas are uncommon tumours. They have aggressive behaviour and thus poor prognosis. This report describes a 40-year old female patient who was referred to our hospital with dyspnoea, weakness and syncopal attacks. Echocardiography and chest computed tomography showed a left atrial mass, and tumour excision revealed a cardiac chondroblastic osteosarcoma. After pathological diagnosis, she was scheduled for chemotherapy and radiotherapy by the related departments.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'Is the placement of an Amplatzer septal occluder device across a post-infarction ventricular septal defect a suitable alternative for patients not eligible for surgical repair?' Altogether, 31 papers were found using the reported search, of which 17 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that the insertion of an Amplatzer occluder device in patients with a post-infarction ventricular septal defect (VSD) not amenable to surgical repair can offer benefit in selected patients. Patients with cardiogenic shock frequently have an unfavourable outcome and closure should be considered cautiously. From the literature available, patients have a better outcome if the intervention is delayed by 2 weeks or more possibly due to the maturation of the VSD and recovery of myocardial function. In certain situations, device closure may be complicated by device dislocation or embolization, residual shunting or a tortuous course not amenable to device implantation. In such settings, surgical repair is the only option. In patients who proceed straight to surgical repair with no attempt at percutaneous closure, the overall mortality lies in the region of 43% and similar to percutaneous closure, there is an association observed between those operated within 7 days of the VSD occurrence and those greater than this time. Patients presenting in cardiogenic shock experienced an increased risk of death and if the timing of myocardial infarction to VSD closure could be delayed by 3 weeks, there was a statistically significant reduction in operative mortality. Percutaneous closure of a post-infarction VSD may avoid the requirement for surgical closure. However, in some cases, it provides time to allow the VSD to mature and the patient to stabilize and be optimized acting as a bridge to surgery to offer the best possible outcome for the patient.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether it is best in a patient with posterior leaflet prolapse to resect tissue from the posterior leaflet or to preserve the leaflet tissue by only adding neochordal reconstruction. Altogether, 279 papers were found using the reported search, of which 16 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date, country of publication, patient group, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. The results of the reported studies provided interesting results. All the studies identified were retrospective. Seven papers reported their results on mitral valve (MV) repair with neochordae. These papers included study groups of 74 to 662 patients. The spanned operation dates were from 1983 to 2008. The main disease was degenerative valve disease. The authors performed MV repair using neochordae with or without a ring. The 5-year freedom rate from reoperation was from 94.3 to 98.7%, the 10-year freedom rate from reoperation was from 81.7 to 94.7%, the 15-year freedom rate from reoperation was 92%, and the 18-year freedom rate from reoperation was 90.2%. The 5-year survival rate was from 96.6 to 96.9%, the 10-year survival rate was from 88 to 89.3%, the 15-year survival rate was 84%, and the 18-year survival rate was 66.8%. Seven papers reported their results on MV repair with resection techniques. These papers included patient groups of 162 to 3074 patients. Operation dates were from 1970 to 2008. The authors performed MV repair with quadrangular resection, plus or minus a sliding annuloplasty. The 5-year freedom rate from reoperation was from 93.9 to 98%, the 10-year freedom rate from reoperation was from 93 to 98.5%, and the 20-year freedom rate from reoperation was from 88 to 96.9%. The 5-year survival rate was from 86.9 to 96%, the 10-year survival rate was from 79 to 93.5%, the 15-year survival rate was 76%, and the 20-year survival rate was from 46 to 62%. The length of follow-up in neochordal papers was shorter and there were fewer patients. The results in the resection groups seemed to derive from larger cohorts of patients and their findings had been proved over a longer period of time. The results of both techniques are comparable and excellent. The surgeons may decide on either technique based on their own experience, safe in the knowledge that both techniques have excellent reported outcomes.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether valve replacement was associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates than valve repair in patients with native active valve endocarditis. Altogether 662 papers were found using the reported search, of which 7 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Traditionally, valve replacement has been the standard therapy for valve endocarditis when surgical treatment is indicated. But now valve repair is increasingly used as an alternative, which may avoid disadvantages of anticoagulation, lower the risk of prosthetic infection and improve postoperative survival. To compare outcomes of these two treatments between studies can be difficult because most of related papers contain raw data on prosthetic valve endocarditis or healed endocarditis, which were excluded from our manuscript. Studies only analysing the outcomes of either of these treatments without the comparison of valve repair and replacement were also excluded. Finally, seven papers were identified. The American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology 2006 valvular guidelines recommended that mitral valve repair should be performed instead of replacement when at all possible. In three of the seven studies, there were significant differences between valve repair and replacement in long-term survival. One study found that aortic valve repair offered better outcomes in freedom from reoperation at 5 years (P = 0.021) and in survival at 4 years (repair vs replacement 88 vs 65%; P = 0.047). One study reported that there was improved event-free survival at 10 years in the mitral valve repair group (P = 0.015), although there was more previous septic embolization in this group. In one study, early and late mortality and event-free survival were better in patients undergoing mitral valve repair compared with replacement (P <0.05), and mitral valve replacement was an independent risk factor for early and late death (P <0.05). In another study, patients having mitral valve repair rather than replacement for acute endocarditis demonstrated improved event-free survival and lower in-hospital mortality, but this failed to reach significance. The remaining two studies showed similar overall survival for both repair and replacement patients. With regard to native active mitral or aortic valve endocarditis, valve repair seems to offer better outcomes in morbidity and long-term survival compared with valve replacement. Whenever it is possible according to the preoperative conditions and intraoperative findings, valve repair should be preferred.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to detect whether the systolic dyssynchrony index (SDI) assessed by real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE) could predict clinical outcomes of patients with ventricular aneurysm in response to surgical ventricular reconstruction (SVR).
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in women. The proposed treatments for women are similar to those for men. However, in women with multivessel stable coronary artery disease and normal left ventricular function, the best treatment is unknown.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Transcatheter device closure of atrial septal defects (ASDs) is a minimally invasive technique that offers an alternative to conventional surgical repair. There are risks imposed by this technique; however, they compare favourably with risks of surgical closure. Here, we present a case of a 59-year old male with late erosion of an Amplatzer septal occluder device resulting in cardiac tamponade 5 years after device placement. To the best of our knowledge, cardiac tamponade this late after device placement has not yet been reported. Septal occlusion device erosion remains a major issue among the risks imposed by device closure of an ASD. More data are needed to better understand its true causes and possible solutions.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 09/2014;
  • Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 09/2014; 19(3):425.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate a two-stage double switch operation, morphological left ventricular (mLV) retraining followed by an atrial-arterial switch operation, in the management of patients with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) and a deconditioned mLV.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We describe the case of a 59-year old male patient undergoing combined coronary artery bypass grafting and aortic valve replacement. Manipulation of the heart during cardiopulmonary bypass significantly decreased venous return. Several measures were necessary to improve venous return to a level at which continuation of the procedure was safe. Based on the initial troubles with venous return, we decided to selectively cross-clamp the aorta. This resulted in a large amount of backflow of oxygenated blood from the left ventricle, necessitating additional vents in the pulmonary artery and directly in the left ventricle. The procedure was continued uneventfully, and postoperative recovery was without significant complications. Postoperative 2D computed tomography did not show any signs of a shunt, but 3D reconstruction showed a small patent ductus arteriosus.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A 2-3-cm blowhole incision in the supraclavicular or infraclavicular area is widely used to eliminate the presence of subcutaneous air in cases of life-threatening subcutaneous emphysema (SE). However, when the patient is supported by mechanical ventilation, it is difficult to eliminate completely such air because mechanical ventilation leads consistently to the formation of large amounts of air. To overcome this, we applied negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) along with blowhole incisions for the treatment of severe SE.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The management of cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery differs from the management of cardiac arrest under other circumstances. In other studies, interposed abdominal compression-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (IAC-CPR) resulted in a better outcome compared with conventional CPR. The aim of the present study was to determine the feasibility, safety and efficacy of IAC-CPR compared with conventional CPR in patients with cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to identify factors affecting patient compliance with brace therapy for pectus carinatum.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An 82-year old woman presented with chest pain and was diagnosed as having acute myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography (CAG) showed 90% stenosis in the proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD). The patient underwent percutaneous coronary intervention using a sirolimus-eluting stent (SES). A repeat CAG performed 6 months after SES implantation revealed no problems. Eight years later, the patient presented with recurrent angina. CAG showed severe stenosis of the SES with a large aneurysm. We performed off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting without ligation or plication of the LAD, but with the application of fibrin glue to the coronary artery aneurysm. The postoperative course was uneventful. The mechanism responsible for the occurrence of coronary artery aneurysms occurring late after drug-eluting stent implantation remains unclear, and the treatment strategy remains controversial. Herein, we discuss a surgical treatment for this rare entity.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 08/2014;

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