Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery (Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg )

Publisher: European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery; European Society for Cardiovascular Surgery

Description

Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery (ICVTS) provides a new platform for the publication of short reports in the field. Basically, ICVTS is conceived as virtual conference relying on both modern media and open discussion. For this purpose, all accepted reports will be posted immediately online on this web site. An electronic, moderated discussion will be open for 28 days through a corresponding link. After closure of the discussion period, the reports pre-published on the web, as well as a selection of the contributions for the moderated discussion, will be published in the ICVTS quarterly with traditional paper format.ICVTS welcomes reports on all aspects of surgery of the heart, great vessels and the chest, including new ideas, short communications, work in progress, follow-up studies, research protocols, registry information, nomenclature, case reports, images, videos, and last but not least, reports on negative experiences.

Impact factor 1.11

  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    3.20
  • Immediacy index
    0.35
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery website
  • Other titles
    Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery (Online), ICVTS
  • ISSN
    1569-9293
  • OCLC
    53098131
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 02/2015; 20(2):171.
  • Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 02/2015; 20(2):221.
  • Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 02/2015; 20(2):284-5.
  • Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 02/2015; 20(2):227-8.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the literature, bronchopleural fistula after thoracic surgery is usually reported in the perioperative setting; however, the incidence of delayed fistula still remains unknown. We herein report a case of a 54-year old man who was referred to the Emergency Department for dyspnoea and productive cough with expectoration of a whitish 'suture-like' tissue. Two months before, the patient underwent an uneventful right lower lobectomy for squamous-cell lung cancer. A computed tomography scan revealed a para-mediastinal localized pneumothorax (measuring 6 cm in the major axis) starting from a right lower bronchus interruption associated with a middle lobe consolidation. The patient was consequently admitted for respiratory monitoring and underwent a fibre-optic bronchoscopy to assess bronchial integrity: the right lower bronchus was completely dehiscent and connected to an empty pleural closed pouch, with no inflammatory signs or sputum-like effusion. After the procedure, the clinical course was unremarkable with gradual improvement of clinical conditions: in particular, the cough disappeared and no sign of fever, leucocytosis or respiratory failure was observed. Thus, after a multidisciplinary meeting, the patient was discharged 7 days after admission and re-evaluated monthly. Six months after diagnosis, the patient was symptom-free with complete closure of the fistula on radiological imaging. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Liver cirrhosis is a known risk factor for postoperative mortality in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Clinical assessment of liver cirrhosis using the widely accepted Child-Pugh (CP) score is thus vital for evaluation of surgical options and perioperative care. However, detailed mortality rates as a consequence of liver cirrhosis are unclear. This review aimed to stratify the risk of short-term (<30 days) and overall (up to 10 years) mortality after cardiac surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis, classified by the CP score. Thus, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were systematically reviewed by two independent investigators for studies published up to February 2014, in which mortality in cirrhotic patients, classified by the CP classification, undergoing cardiac surgery was evaluated postoperatively. A total of 993 articles were identified. After critical appraisal of 21 articles, 19 were selected for final analysis. Weighted short-term mortality of cirrhotic patients undergoing cardiac surgery was 19.3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 16.4-22.5%]. Across the different CP groups, short-term mortality appeared to be 9.0% (95% CI: 6.6-12.2%), 37.7% (95% CI: 30.8-44.3%) and 52.0% (95% CI: 33.5-70.0%) in Groups A, B and C, respectively. Weighted overall mortality within 1 year was 42.0% (95% CI: 36.0-48.3%) in all cirrhotic patients. Subdivided in groups, overall mortality within that 1 year was 27.2% (95% CI: 20.9-34.7%), 66.2% (95% CI: 54.3-76.3%) and 78.9% (95% CI: 56.1-92.1%) in Groups A, B and C, respectively. In conclusion, short-term mortality is considerably increased in patients with liver cirrhosis CP class B and C. Overall mortality is significantly high in all classes of liver cirrhosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The prognostic significance of previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is still unclear. Although many studies have reported adverse effects of previous PCI on postoperative mortality in CABG, as yet no meta-analysis has been carried out. We conducted this first meta-analysis to assess whether previous PCI increases postoperative mortality in CABG. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for relevant articles up to and including April 2014. Studies published in English satisfying the following criteria were included in the meta-analysis: (i) comparing CABG patients with previous PCI versus without previous PCI; and (ii) reporting hospital mortality. Our search identified 23 comparative studies, including 174 777 patients: 19 179 with previous PCI and 155 598 without previous PCI. Pooled analysis demonstrated that previous PCI had an adverse effect on hospital mortality: odds ratio (OR) 1.187, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.075-1.312. Furthermore, subgroup analysis stratified by the proportion of multiple previous PCI (i.e. number of patients with multiple previous PCI/number of patients with single or multiple previous PCI) was performed. In the subgroup of studies with the proportion <40%, the adverse effect was not significant: OR 0.897 (95% CI 0.723-1.113); however, in the subgroup of studies with the proportion ≥40%, the adverse effect of previous PCI was significant: OR 1.987 (95% CI 1.563-2.526). A meta-regression coefficient was significantly positive for the proportion of patients with a history of multiple PCI (coefficient 0.841; 95% CI 0.457-1.226; P < 0.001). This meta-analysis would argue that as the proportion of patients with multiple previous PCI in the CABG cohort increases, postoperative mortality also increases. This result re-emphasizes the importance of the heart team approach to coronary revascularization. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Systemic hypertension is the main late complication after arch reconstruction in patients with arch obstruction. Gothic arch geometry is suspected to be one of its possible causes. Accordingly, we evaluated here if a modified arch repair technique using an autologous pulmonary patch is effective in preventing gothic arch development. Fifty infants who underwent arch repair with either a modified (n = 17) or conventional (n = 33) technique between January 2006 and August 2012 by a single surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. Arch geometry was compared using three categories (gothic, crenel or roman), classified by the height/width (H/W) ratio and the arch angle measured in computed tomography. No gothic arch geometry was observed in the modified group, whereas it was observed in 9 cases in the conventional group (P = 0.005). Moreover, reintervention for arch restenosis was performed only in the conventional group (n = 4; P = 0.29). No associated complications were observed, although the selective cerebral perfusion time was longer in the modified group than in the conventional group (28.5 ± 6.2 vs 17.1 ± 9.9 min; P < 0.001). Otherwise, there were no significant differences in clinical variables between the groups. The mean follow-up duration was 55.3 ± 26.7 months. Significant systemic hypertension was not observed in our study cohort. Our modified technique was proven to be not only highly effective in preventing gothic arch geometry, but also as equally safe in terms of early clinical outcomes as conventional arch reconstruction techniques. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether on-pump beating heart coronary artery bypass (BH-ONCAB) surgery has a different outcome profile in comparison to off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB). A total of 205 papers were found by systematic search of which 7 provided the largest and most recent outcome analysis comparing BH-ONCAB with OPCAB, and represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, date, journal, study type, population, main outcome measures and results were tabulated. Reported outcome measures included mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction, renal failure, myocardial damage, change in ejection fraction, number of bypass grafts and completeness of revascularization. With the exception of one study that favoured the off-pump technique, our review did not demonstrate a statistically significant difference in terms of mortality between the groups. We did not identify a statistically significant difference in any reported morbidity outcomes. However, there was a trend towards better outcomes for the on-pump beating heart technique, despite a higher risk profile in terms of age, ejection fraction and burden of coronary disease in this group. Consistent statistically significant differences between the groups were the mean number of grafts performed and the completeness of revascularization, both of which were higher with the on-pump beating heart technique. Limitations to the current evidence include the finding that most of the current data arise from specialist off-pump surgeons or centres that would usually only carry out BH-ONCAB in the higher risk patients where the added safety of cardiopulmonary bypass is desired. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The association between interstitial lung disease and polymyositis/dermatomyositis is well known. It severely affects patients' quality of life, worsens prognosis and represents a major risk factor for premature death. Current treatment is unclear and therapeutic options are based on case series. We report the case of a 15-year old female diagnosed with end-stage lung disease associated to polymyositis who received a double lung transplant after 20 days of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. She died 9 months later and microscopic post-mortem findings revealed recurrence of interstitial lung disease. This is the first time that recurrence of polymyositis-associated lung disease following lung transplantation is described in the literature. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (Mini-AVR) is a technically advanced procedure. However, it results in equivalent operative mortality, less bleeding and reduced intensive care/hospital stay when compared with conventional AVR. Our aim was to assess the impact of trainee performance on short-term outcomes of patients undergoing elective and urgent Mini-AVR where a significant proportion were performed by trainees. All patients undergoing non-emergency, elective and urgent, isolated Mini-AVR between September 2005 and December 2012 were studied. Operative details and short-term outcomes, with particular attention to trainee performance, were analysed. During the study period, there were 205 Mini-AVR with a median age of 67 years (range 29-86); 74 (36%) operations were performed by trainees. The overall median cross-clamp and bypass times were 42 (range 33-63) and 59 min (range 59-94) for the attending surgeon and 52 (range 42-63) and 71 min (range 59-94) for the trainee (P = 0.03). Five Mini-AVR patients (2.4%) required conversion to full sternotomy for ascending aortic replacement, right ventricular bleeding, coronary artery bypass graft surgery and failure to cardiovert. None of these cases were performed by trainees. Median lengths of intensive care and hospital stay were 1 and 5 days and were not different for attending surgeon and trainee. Only 1 (0.5%) patient died in hospital. Mini-AVR can be performed with a low conversion rate and hospital stay and taught to trainees without compromising safety. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Maximal graft flow acceleration (max df/dt) determined by transit-time flowmetry (TTFM) in the diastolic phase was assessed as a possible predictor of graft failure in coronary artery bypass patients. Max df/dt was retrospectively measured in 57 in situ left internal thoracic artery grafts. TTFM data were fitted to a 5-polynomial curve, which was derived from the first-derivative curve to measure max df/dt (5-polymial max df/dt). Abnormal TTFM was defined as a mean flow of <15 ml/min, pulsatility index of >5 or diastolic filling ratio of <50%. Postoperative coronary angiography (CAG) or multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) was performed within 1 year after surgery. The grafts were classified into four groups: Normal TTFM/Patent MDCT/CAG (N/P), Normal TTFM/Failing MDCT/CAG (N/F), Abnormal TTFM/Patent MDCT/CAG (Ab-N/P) and Abnormal TTFM/Failing MDCT/CAG graft (Ab-N/F). By TTFM, 34 grafts were normal, 5 of which were occluded on CAG, and 23 grafts were abnormal, six of which were occluded on CAG. There were significant differences in 5-polynomial max df/dt between each group pair (P < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test) except for the N/F:Ab-N/P group pair; especially, 5-polynomial max df/dt was significantly lower in the Ab-N/F group compared with the other groups (Ab-N/F: 0.89 ± 0.41 vs N/P: 4.74 ± 3.18, N/F: 2.23 ± 0.65, Ab-N/P: 2.70 ± 1.31 ml/s(2), P < 0.01, Mann-Whitney U-test). The sensitivity and specificity of 5-polynomial max df/dt were, respectively, 72.7 and 80.4% (cut-off value, 1.918 ml/s(2)) for all grafts and 100 and 88.2% (cut-off value, 1.273 ml/s(2)) for abnormal TTFM grafts. The TTFM 5-polymial max df/dt value in the early diastolic phase may be a promising predictor of future graft failure. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Valuable treatment modalities for branch pulmonary artery (BPA) stenoses are surgical patch angioplasty, percutaneous BPA stenting and hybrid stent placement. The purpose of this study was to report our institutional experience with hybrid stent placement to relieve BPA stenoses. Between August 2007 and May 2014, 7 adults (5 females) with congenital heart disease (CHD) had elective intraoperative BPA stent placement. All 7 patients had undergone previous surgery [6 tetralogy of Fallot repairs and 1 arterial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries (TGAs)]. A total of 7 stents (4 right pulmonary artery, 3 left pulmonary artery) were implanted under direct vision, concomitant with a pulmonary homograft implantation (tetralogy of Fallot patients), or because percutaneous stenting was not feasible (TGA patient). Retrospective analysis of clinical data, procedural details and outcomes was performed. Overall, the mean age was 35 ± 7.2 years. Stent implantation was successful in all procedures. The mean postinflation stent diameter was 13.3 ± 2.0 mm. No stent migration, fracture, stent thrombosis, reintervention or deaths occurred. In 1 case the procedure was complicated by a right pulmonary artery tear just distal to the stent which was repaired by surgical patch angioplasty. At a mean follow-up of 55.6 ± 26 months no patient required catheter reintervention or surgery. Echocardiography (mean follow-up 47.1 ± 22 months), MRI (mean follow-up 43.8 ± 37 months) and CT data (mean follow-up 14.8 ± 10 months) demonstrate a BPA diameter increment from a mean 5.57 ± 2.29 to 10.71 ± 2.56 mm. Hybrid intraoperative BPA stent placement is safe and effective and can be used as an alternative for surgical patch angioplasty or if percutaneous BPA stenting is not feasible. Short- to mid-term results are good. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pectus excavatum is one of the most common congenital deformities of the chest wall. The aim of the study was to analyse 621 artefacts (reliefs, sculptures, paintings) from Ancient Egypt in terms of anatomical defects of the chest. The team which analysed artefacts consisted of historians of medicine and thoracic surgeons. The researchers found a relief, depicting a man with an abnormal shape of the chest. The relief was from Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep mastaba and dates back to circa 2400 BC. The authors think it is possible that the relief may represent a pectus excavatum deformity and believe the image will open up debate on the occurrence of this deformity in ancient times. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Our goals were (i) to identify the incidence and risk factors of postoperative urinary retention in minor thoracic surgery patients and (ii) to develop a scoring system to predict postoperative urinary retention in these patients. Two hundred and ninety-two consecutive patients who underwent thoracic surgery without a pre- or intraoperative indwelling urinary catheter under general anaesthesia were used to identify the risk factors of postoperative urinary retention (post-void residual urine >200 ml) and to develop the scoring system predicting the incidence of this complication. We investigated past history, type of operation, operation time, amount of administered intravenous fluids, medications used perioperatively as well as demographic data. The incidence rate of postoperative urinary retention was 11.6% (34/292). Independent risk factors and their scores were the following: age above 40 years (P < 0.001; two points); male (P = 0.002; one point); diabetes mellitus (P = 0.002; one point) and lung resection (P < 0.001; two points). The cut-off value for a model predicting postoperative urinary retention was five points (C-index = 0.88; 95% confidence interval: 0.83-0.94), with 73% sensitivity and 90% specificity. In minor thoracic surgery patients, special attention should be paid to detect postoperative urinary retention in those with the following characteristics: age over 40 years, male gender, history of diabetes mellitus and candidates for lung resection. The use of the developed scoring system may help in identifying those high-risk patients who need more aggressive management to prevent bladder overdistension and associated urinary complications. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary metastasectomy is considered an effective treatment in selected patients with extrapulmonary cancer and oligometastatic disease. We know that the presence of mediastinal lymph node metastases reduces survival significantly, but the mediastinum is rarely evaluated before metastasectomy in these patients. We prospectively evaluated how endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) could identify metastases to the mediastinal lymph nodes in patients referred for pulmonary metastasectomy. All patients with extrapulmonary cancer and oligometastatic disease confined to the lungs on positron emission tomography-computed tomography, and who were considered eligible for pulmonary metastasectomy, routinely underwent EBUS-TBNA of the mediastinal lymph nodes. If EBUS-TBNA did not reveal malignant spread, the patient subsequently underwent pulmonary metastasectomy with systematic sampling of mediastinal lymph nodes for histological evaluation. One hundred and three eligible patients were referred for EBUS-TBNA during a 4-year period. The primary cancers were located in the colon/rectum (n = 64), kidney (n = 16) and other sites (n = 23). EBUS-TBNA sampled 248 lymph nodes and adequate cytology was obtained in 93 patients (90%). EBUS-TBNA found lymph node metastases in 17 patients (16.5%) and during subsequent pulmonary metastasectomy in the remaining 86 patients 1 (1.0%) had a lymph node metastasis. The sensitivity, specificity, NPV and PPV of EBUS-TBNA for diagnosis of mediastinal lymph node metastasis were 94.4, 100, 98.8 and 100%, respectively. EBUS-TBNA is a sensitive minimally invasive modality for evaluation of mediastinal lymph node metastases in patients with oligometastatic pulmonary disease. It allows surgeons to select patients who will not benefit from pulmonary metastasectomy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015;
  • Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015; 20(1):39.
  • Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015; 20(1):78.
  • Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2015; 20(1):67.