Harmful Algae (HARMFUL ALGAE )

Publisher: Elsevier

Description

This new journal will provide a forum to promote knowledge of harmful microalgae, including cyanobacteria, as well as monitoring, management and control of these organisms. Both original research and review papers will be considered. Papers dealing with the following aspects of harmful microalgae and cyanobacteria in marine and fresh waters will be considered: the distribution, life histories and taxonomy of harmful microalgae; the physiology and toxicology of harmful microalgae; harmful microalgal bloom ecology; trophic, socio-economic, public health and aquacultural impacts of harmful microalgal bloom events; occurrence, methods of detection and chemical structure of toxins in harmful microalgae, cyanobacteria, foodwebs and seafood; factors controlling toxin production, biosynthesis and chemical ecology.

  • Impact factor
    2.90
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    3.95
  • Cited half-life
    4.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.99
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.91
  • Website
    Harmful Algae website
  • Other titles
    Harmful algae (Online)
  • ISSN
    1568-9883
  • OCLC
    50177604
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Voluntary deposit by author of pre-print allowed on Institutions open scholarly website and pre-print servers
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and publisher exists
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PMC after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • Pre-print can not be deposited for The Lancet
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The toxic benthic dinoflagellate genus Ostreopsis has been connected to the production of palytoxin and its analogs in many tropical and temperate areas. Although the type species, O. siamensis, was originally described from the Gulf of Thailand in 1901, little is known about the species composition and distribution of the genus Ostreopsis in Thailand. In this study, a total of 64 Ostreopsis strains isolated from the Andaman Sea as well as the Gulf of Thailand were investigated by analyzing the nucleotide sequences of the LSU rDNA D1/D2, D8/D10 and ITS-5.8S rDNA regions. Phylogenetic analyses (BI and ML) resulted in some of the strains being assigned to previously described clades, O. cf. ovata and Ostreopsis sp. 6, and revealed the existence of a novel clade named Ostreopsis sp. 7, which exhibited large genetic distances from the other clades. Among O. cf. ovata, several strains from Thailand were formed into a new subclade, the Thailand subclade, whereas a few strains belonged to the South China Sea subclade. Morphometric characteristics such as the cell sizes of the two O. cf. ovata subclades and those of Ostreopsis sp. 7 were not significantly different from each other (p > 0.05). Their characteristics were similar but slightly different from those of O. ovata and were significantly different from those of Ostreopsis sp. 6 (p < 0.05). Toxicities of Ostreopsis from Thailand were evaluated using mouse bioassay. Strains of Ostreopsis sp. 6 and Ostreopsis sp. 7 tested were highly toxic, while the two subclades of O. cf. ovata strains seemed to be nontoxic. This study suggests that toxic Ostreopsis sp. 7 is distributed in the Andaman Sea, whereas the two subclades of O. cf. ovata and toxic Ostreopsis sp. 6 are distributed in the Gulf of Thailand.
    Harmful Algae 07/2014; 37:160–171.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Diatom blooms in Thau lagoon are always related to rain events leading to inputs of inorganic nutrients such as phosphate, ammonium and nitrate through the watershed with time lags of about 1 week. In contrast, blooms of Alexandrium catenella/tamarense can occur following periods of 3 weeks without precipitation and no significant input of conventional nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate. Field results also indicate a significant drop (from 22–25 to 15–16 μM over 3 days) in dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) at the bloom peak, as well as a significant inverse relationship between A. catenella/tamarense cell density and DON concentrations that is not apparent for diatom blooms. Such dinoflagellate blooms are also associated with elevated (6–9 μM) ammonium concentrations, a curious feature also observed by other investigators, possibly the results of ammonium excretion by this organism during urea or other organic nitrogen assimilation. The potential use of DON by this organism represents short cuts in the nitrogen cycle between plants and nutrients and requires a new model for phytoplankton growth that is different from the classical diatom bloom model. In contrast to such diatom blooms that are due to conventional (nitrate, phosphate) nutrient pulses, Alexandrium catenella/tamarense blooms on the monthly time scale are due to organic nutrient enrichment, a feature that allows net growth rates of about 1.3 d−1, a value higher than that generally attributed to such organisms.
    Harmful Algae 06/2014; 37(C):84-91.
  • Harmful Algae 05/2014; 35:38-45.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The biological role of cyanobacteria secondary metabolites is relatively unknown although several possible hypotheses have been discussed. In the following study the effect of cylindrospermopsin (CYN) and metabolites of non-CYN producing Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii strain on growth, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and microcystin-LR (MC-LR) production in Microcystis aeruginosa was evaluated. Higher concentrations of CYN (10 and 50 μg L−1) induced toxicity effects demonstrated by significant growth inhibition and M. aeruginosa cell necrosis. Lower concentrations of CYN (1 and 5 μg L−1) slightly decreased growth rates but significantly up-regulated ALP activity. Moreover, under all studied CYN concentrations MC-LR production strongly decreased. Spent C. raciborskii medium mimicked the CYN action by inducing strong inhibition of M. aeruginosa growth and MC-LR production and through up-regulation of ALP activity. On the other hand, spent M. aeruginosa medium did not affect C. raciborskii growth and no alterations in ALP activity were observed. Co-culturing of these two species resulted in an increase of C. raciborskii contribution at the expense of M. aeruginosa. From the results we conclude that CYN can be involved in interspecific competition in cyanobacteria and that non-CYN producing C. raciborskii strains may produce a hitherto unknown bioactive compound(s) which can mimic CYN action.
    Harmful Algae 04/2014; 35:1-8.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Toxic marine dinoflagellate species of the genus Dinophysis Ehrenberg are obligate mixotrophs that require feeding on the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum and light to achieve growth. It is now well known that they harbor plastids of cryptophyte origin, particularly of the genus Teleaulax, Plagioselmis or Geminigera group (TPG clade). Nevertheless, whether these plastids are permanent, or periodically acquired from M. rubrum prey, need additional studies in different phototrophic Dinophysis species. The origin of plastids from Dinophysis acuta Ehrenberg, one of the main agents of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) outbreaks in Western Europe, was investigated here. Cross feeding-starvation experiments were carried out with cultures of D. acuta using M. rubrum as prey, the latter fed with two cryptophyte species, Teleaulax amphioxeia Hill and Teleaulax gracilis, belonging to the TPG clade in addition to Falcomonas sp. and Hemiselmis sp. The fate of cryptophyte plastids transferred to D. acuta through its ciliate prey was investigated using the plastid psbA gene as a tracer.
    Harmful Algae 03/2014; Accepted.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Toxic marine dinoflagellate species of the genus Dinophysis Ehrenberg are obligate mixotrophs that require feeding on the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum and light to achieve growth. It is now well known that they harbor plastids of cryptophyte origin, particularly of the genus Teleaulax, Plagioselmis or Geminigera group (TPG clade). Nevertheless, whether these plastids are permanent, or periodically acquired from M. rubrum prey, need additional studies in different phototrophic Dinophysis species. The origin of plastids from Dinophysis acuta Ehrenberg, one of the main agents of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) outbreaks in Western Europe, was investigated here. Cross feeding-starvation experiments were carried out with cultures of D. acuta using M. rubrum as prey, the latter fed with two cryptophyte species, Teleaulax amphioxeia Hill and Teleaulax gracilis, belonging to the TPG clade in addition to Falcomonas sp. and Hemiselmis sp. The fate of cryptophyte plastids transferred to D. acuta through its ciliate prey was investigated using the plastid psbA gene as a tracer.
    Harmful Algae 02/2014; Accepted.

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