Harmful Algae Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Elsevier

Journal description

This new journal will provide a forum to promote knowledge of harmful microalgae, including cyanobacteria, as well as monitoring, management and control of these organisms. Both original research and review papers will be considered. Papers dealing with the following aspects of harmful microalgae and cyanobacteria in marine and fresh waters will be considered: the distribution, life histories and taxonomy of harmful microalgae; the physiology and toxicology of harmful microalgae; harmful microalgal bloom ecology; trophic, socio-economic, public health and aquacultural impacts of harmful microalgal bloom events; occurrence, methods of detection and chemical structure of toxins in harmful microalgae, cyanobacteria, foodwebs and seafood; factors controlling toxin production, biosynthesis and chemical ecology.

Current impact factor: 3.34

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 3.339
2012 Impact Factor 2.901
2011 Impact Factor 3.083
2010 Impact Factor 4.28
2009 Impact Factor 2.5
2008 Impact Factor 2.688
2007 Impact Factor 2.397
2006 Impact Factor 2.46
2005 Impact Factor 2.709

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.95
Cited half-life 4.60
Immediacy index 0.99
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.91
Website Harmful Algae website
Other titles Harmful algae (Online)
ISSN 1568-9883
OCLC 50177604
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Harmful algal blooms (HAB), commonly referred to as ‘red tides’, involving the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis produce a series of neurotoxins known as brevetoxins (PbTx). Brevetoxins have long been associated with extensive fish kills, adverse human health effects such as neurotoxic shellfish poisoning, and have been associated with mortality events in aquatic mammals such as bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). The immunotoxicological effects of these brevetoxins have been studied in manatees, humans, and cell lines, however, the effects in bottlenose dolphins remain unclear. There are increasing concerns that dolphins may be exposed to repeated/chronic, sub-lethal concentrations, which may impact their overall health. The objectives of this study were to measure the changes in innate (phagocytosis, respiratory burst, NK cell activity) and adaptive (mitogen-induced B and T lymphocyte proliferation) immune functions upon in vitro exposure to increasing concentrations of brevetoxin (PbTx-3) (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100, 500, and 1000 nM) using bottlenose dolphin peripheral blood immune cells. Brevetoxin significantly increased spontaneous lymphocyte proliferation at 0.1–1000 nM compared to the unexposed control. Brevetoxin significantly increased T lymphocyte proliferation upon suboptimal (0.1 μg/ml) and optimal (1.0 μg/ml) Con-A stimulation at 0.01–100 nM and 0.1 nM of PbTx-3 respectively, as well as suboptimal (0.05 μg/ml) and optimal (5.0 μg/ml) LPS-induced B lymphocyte proliferation at 0.01–100 nM and 0.01–500 nM of PbTx-3, respectively. Both neutrophil and monocyte respiratory burst were significantly increased at 500 and 1000 nM. There were no significant effects on neutrophil or monocyte phagocytosis or NK cell activity. Importantly, concentrations that modulated immune functions in vitro were within the range measured in the blood of dolphins during two unusual mortality events, suggesting that naturally exposed dolphins may be at risk for immunomodulation. Brevetoxin-induced immunomodulation may increase an animal's susceptibility to bacterial, viral, or fungal infections. Understanding the risk for immunomodulation upon HAB toxin exposure can contribute in the health assessment and management of marine mammals, as well as guide veterinarians and wildlife rehabilitators in caring for and treating afflicted animals.
    Harmful Algae 04/2015; 44. DOI:10.1016/j.hal.2015.02.010
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Most diatom species produce at least two classes of oxylipins, polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) and non-volatile oxylipins (NVOs). These compounds can act as grazer deterrents by reducing the reproductive success of copepod grazers. The aim of the present study was to better understand the impact of late-winter diatom blooms and of diatom-derived PUAs and NVOs on the reproduction of two dominant copepod species in the northern Adriatic Sea, in two consecutive years. Higher diatom abundance in 2005 compared to 2004 coincided with higher egg-production rates in both Acartia clausi and Calanus helgolandicus. The increased contribution of diatoms to the phytoplankton assemblage in 2005 also led to a higher phytoplankton production of NVOs, whereas PUA levels were low in both years. These three-times-higher oxylipin levels correlated with a decrease in average hatching success in both A. clausi and C. helgolandicus from ∼80% in 2004 to ∼60% in 2005, indicating that the observed negative effects on copepod recruitment in the latter year were related to the greater production of diatom NVOs. Our findings reveal the importance of these metabolites and offer an explanation as to why diatom blooms may be more toxic for copepods in some years compared to others.
    Harmful Algae 04/2015; 44. DOI:10.1016/j.hal.2015.02.003
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The diatom Eucampia zodiacus is a harmful species that indirectly causes bleaching to nori (Pyropia) cultivation through competitive utilization of nutrients during its bloom, however cellular storage and changes in physiology by asexual reproduction remains unclear. In the present study, we experimentally investigated the nitrate (N), phosphate (P) and silicic acid (Si) consumption by various cell sizes of E. zodiacus strains, the apical axis length of which ranged from 10.2 to 77.3 μm. Nutrient cell quotas of E. zodiacus ranged from 2.7 to 8.4 pM cell−1 for N, 0.34–0.76 pM cell−1 for P and 1.7–7.3 pM cell−1 for Si, and they increased with cell size, in which there is a significant correlation between these two elements. The N and P quotas were estimated to be several times higher than the minimum cell quotas. In contrast, the Si cell quotas were approximately equal to those of the minimum values. Based on the present cell quotas, total nitrate consumption by E. zodiacus population when the blooms reached maximum cell density (=1000 cells ml−1) were estimated to be 6.5 μM. Monthly mean concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) range from 3.5 to 8.2 μM during the period of late nori harvest season when E. zodiacus blooms occur, and nori bleaching is reported at the condition of DIN concentration of less than 3 μM in Harima-Nada, eastern Seto Inland Sea, Japan. Therefore, the present results suggest that E. zodiacus causes serious damage to nori cultivation due to high levels of nutrient consumption.
    Harmful Algae 04/2015; 44. DOI:10.1016/j.hal.2015.02.007
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The diatom Eucampia zodiacus is a harmful species that indirectly causes bleaching to nori (Pyropia) cultivation through competitive utilization of nutrients during its bloom, however cellular storage and changes in physiology by asexual reproduction remains unclear. In the present study, we experimentally investigated the nitrate (N), phosphate (P) and silicic acid (Si) consumption by various cell sizes of E. zodiacus strains, the apical axis length of which ranged from 10.2 to 77.3 µm. Nutrient cell quotas of E. zodiacus ranged from 2.7 to 8.4 pM cell-1 for N, 0.34-0.76 pM cell-1 for P and 1.7-7.3 pM cell-1 for Si, and they increased with cell size, which there is a significant correlation between these two elements. The N and P quotas were estimated to be several times higher than the minimum cell quotas. In contrast, the Si cell quotas were approximately equal to those of the minimum values. Based on the present cell quotas, total nitrate consumption by E. zodiacus population when the blooms reached maximum cell density (=1000 cells ml-1) were estimated to be 6.5 µM. Monthly mean concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) range from 3.5 to 8.2 µM during the period of late nori harvest season when E. zodiacus blooms occur, and nori bleaching is reported at the condition of DIN concentration of less than 3 µM in Harima-Nada, eastern Seto Inland Sea, Japan. Therefore, the present results suggest that E. zodiacus causes serious damage to nori cultivation due to high levels of nutrient consumption.
    Harmful Algae 04/2015; 44:32-36.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The toxic haptophyte Prymnesium parvum regularly forms fish-killing blooms in inland brackish water bodies in the south-central USA. Along the Texas coast smaller blooms have occurred in isolated areas. There appears to be an increasing risk that harmful P. parvum blooms will propagate into open coastal waters with implementation of future water plans. These plans will include increased interbasin water transfers from the Brazos River, regularly impacted by P. parvum blooms, to the San Jacinto-Brazos Coastal Basin, which ultimately flows into Galveston Bay (GB). Persisting source populations of P. parvum in inland waters elevates this risk. Thus, there is a need for an increased understanding of how P. parvum might perform in coastal waters, such as those found in GB. Here, two in-field experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various plankton size-fractions of GB water on inoculated P. parvum during fall and winter, periods when blooms are typically initiating and developing inland. Stationary- and log-growth phase P. parvum were used to represent high and low toxicity initial conditions. Results revealed that P. parvum could grow in GB waters and cause acute mortality to silverside minnows (Menidia beryllina). Depending on season and growth phase, however, P. parvum growth and toxicity varied in different size fractions. During the fall, P. parvum inoculated from stationary-, but not log-growth phase culture, was negatively affected by bacteria-sized particles. During the winter, bacteria and nanoplankton together had a negative effect on P. parvum inoculated from stationary- and, to a lesser degree, log-growth phase cultures. Intermediate- and large-sized grazers when combined with bacteria and nanoplankton had complex relationships with inoculated P. parvum, sometimes stimulating and sometimes suppressing population growth. Toxicity to fish occurred in almost all plankton size fractions. The inclusion of progressively larger sized plankton fractions resulted in trends of decreased toxicity in treatments inoculated with stationary-, but not log-growth phase P. parvum in the fall. In the winter, however, inclusion of larger sized plankton fractions resulted in trends of increased toxicity to fish in treatments inoculated with both stationary- and log-growth phase P. parvum. This study indicates that understanding P. parvum population dynamics in open waters of estuaries and bays will be challenging, as there appears to be complex relationships with naturally occurring components of the plankton. The observations that P. parvum is able to grow to high population density and produce fish-killing levels of toxins underscores the need for advanced risk assessment studies, especially in light of water use plans that will result in P. parvum invasions of greater size.
    Harmful Algae 03/2015; 43. DOI:10.1016/j.hal.2014.12.008
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) is caused by the consumption of molluscan shellfish meat contaminated with brevetoxins produced by the dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis (K. brevis). During a prolonged and intermittent K. brevis bloom starting in 2005 lasting through early 2007 in the Gulf of Mexico off southwest Florida coast, there were 24 confirmed cases of NSP linked to the consumption of clams recreationally harvested in, or in close proximity to, regulated shellfish harvesting areas; these shellfish beds had already been officially closed to harvesting due to the presence of the K. brevis bloom. The majority of NSP cases (78%) were in “visitors,” either non-Florida residents or Florida residents living outside the county of harvest. The number of confirmed NSP cases was likely an underestimate of the actual number of cases.
    Harmful Algae 03/2015; 43:13-19. DOI:10.1016/j.hal.2014.12.003