International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning

Description

IJCEELL is the journal of continuing engineering education, lifelong learning and professional development for scientists, engineers and technologists. It deals with continuing education and the learning organisation, virtual laboratories, interactive knowledge media, new technologies for delivery of education and training, future developments in continuing engineering education; continuing engineering education and lifelong learning in the field of management, and government policies relating to continuing engineering education and lifelong learning. The objectives of the IJCEELL are to help professionals working in the field, educators, training providers and policy-makers to disseminate information and to learn from each other's work. The journal publishes original papers, case studies, technical reports, conference reports, book reviews, commentaries and news items. Commentaries on papers and reports published in the Journal are encouraged. Authors will have the opportunity to respond to a commentary on their work before the correspondence is published.

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: This paper proposes an algorithm to lessen the impacts of variety of distortions occurred in aerial images. The proposed algorithm detects the noisy pixels in a given image using fuzzy logic based technique in an iterative manner, then the noisy image is corrected based on the cellular structure modeling to filter out the noise. Our solution for noise reduction overcomes the difficulties of cellular automaton (CA) model in noise estimation and finds the accurate noisy mask by providing a fuzzy technique. Simulation results of the proposed algorithm show the accuracy and effectiveness of this algorithm for image with high percentage of pepper and salt noise.
    International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Improving the effectiveness of eAssessment depends on the knowledge and experience of feedback-givers. This paper describes an indirect approach to improving feedback for learners – training the feedback-giver while actually preparing the feedback for the learners. Specifically, the aim is to help inexperienced teaching assistants (TAs) who lack training in how to provide quality feedback. The approach emphasises the ways in which feedback is organised through the use of feedback patterns. There is evidence that students in higher education, like adult learners, require improved feedback to make their learning more efficient. McFeSPA (metacognitive feedback scaffolding system for pedagogical apprenticeship) was designed and implemented as efeedback to help improve the TAs' feedback skills while marking programming assignments – and then evaluated to determine whether TAs could benefit from automated feedback. The evaluation involves examining the system with scaffolding turned off to help three TAs give feedback to a group of students and scaffolding turned on for three TAs using the full system. The results are broadly favourable.
    International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning 01/2010; 20(2):148-168.
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    ABSTRACT: Nadeem, D., Stoyanov, S. and Koper, R. (2009) ‘Social support system in learning network for lifelong learners: a conceptual framework’, Int. Journal Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning, Vol. 19, No. 4/5/6, pp.337–351.
    International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning 11/2009; 19(4/5/6):337–351.
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    ABSTRACT: Information Technologies (IT) open many possibilities in education, and e-learning projects are nowadays implemented in many universities and corporate settings. However, the huge majority of these projects fail. This is especially true in professional education and corporate training. We believe that focus on technology (technocentrism) and on 'content' (infocentrism) are among the main causes of these failures. To radically improve this situation, we present in this paper an alternative perspective based on the distinction between 'learn about' and 'learn to do', and on innovative educational thinking (John Dewey, Jean Piaget, Lev Vygotsky, Seymour Papert and Hubert Dreyfus, among others). How this framework can become a reality is then explained with three examples of e-learning implementations that allow for 'learn to do'. Finally, we discuss how IT can add value to learning when one is focused at learning in and through practice.
    International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning 10/2007; 17(6):406-417.
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    ABSTRACT: A majority of the pedagogical uses of computers fall somewhere within the five headings of drill, number crunching, laboratory applications, simulations, and self-paced courses (Arons, 1984). In this paper, we discuss a sixth use for computerised instruction, dispersed laboratories over the internet, one which was probably unanticipated years ago when the internet and laboratory technologies were less accessible and less friendly than now. The pervasive interconnectivity of the internet provides the means for entirely new kinds of laboratory experiences for the science student. For example, students can remotely access laboratory equipment that previously would have been too expensive or too dangerous for a typical student laboratory. Large-scale collaborative experiments between students separated geographically are also possible. This paper presents an overview of the technology for science laboratories over the internet, example laboratory experiments, and potential applications. New Albany, Indiana. He has published technical papers in non-linear dynamics and theoretical biophysics in addition to pedagogical papers about the use of computers in student laboratories and distance learning. His current interests include applications of physics to environmental issues and open source physics simulations for the classroom.
    International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning 01/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: WebTOP is a three-dimensional, interactive computer graphics system developed at Mississippi State University to help students learn about optics and waves. It has been used to help teach undergraduate introductory physics and upper-level optics classes. Currently, it comprises sixteen modules spanning eight different subject areas. The subject areas are waves, geometrical optics, reflection and refraction, polarization, interference, diffraction, lasers, and scattering. WebTOP simulations have the following characteristics. First, they are three dimensional, i.e., they have navigation controls that allow the user to rotate the scene, pan it, or zoom into it, in order to view it from any desired orientation. Secondly, they are interactive. The user can change the parameters either by typing in the desired values into the appropriate text entry box, or by using his/her mouse cursor to move the appropriate widget in the scene. Thirdly, the simulations are animated, for those phenomena for which animation is appropriate. Furthermore, the simulations include VCR-type controls that allow the user to record his/her interaction with the simulation for later retrieval, viewing, and editing. Finally, these modules run inside a web browser. They can be run from our website, http://webtop.msstate.edu, or they can be downloaded from this website and run on the user's local machine. This paper provides an overview of WebTOP and a description of each of the modules.
    International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning 01/2005; 15.
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    ABSTRACT: One of the debates within science teaching is the appropriate use of diverse materials to enhance the learning experiences. Significant amounts of time were set aside within curricula for relevant practical experiences but these are now often being replaced by alternative activities. In the biology context, practical experiences have included dissections, drawings, microscopy, experimentation and discussions. For many reasons, an increasing number of students these days are disinclined to handle biological materials, whilst financial cutbacks are making their provision more difficult, which makes teaching the discipline increasingly difficult. This paper discusses how first year biology students at The University of Sydney use a variety of virtual resources to provide a stimulating learning environment in an atmosphere of dwindling resources. Our research shows that students find both real and virtual materials useful in supporting their learning, illustrating the value of offering a diverse range of materials.
    International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning 01/2005; 15.
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    ABSTRACT: 1D collisions are part of the curriculum for 15 16 year olds in the educational system of Cyprus. The curriculum activities in this domain commonly rely on a mathematical approach and are constrained by prerequisite algebraic skills. Conservation laws have the broadest possible application of all laws in physics and are thus considered by many scientists to be the most fundamental laws in our representations of nature. However, they are currently presented in the educational system in a very didactic manner with the result that students identify them as meaningless algorithms to be implemented in working out a solution as to the outcome of a collision. In this paper, we focus on the design of inquiry based curriculum that aims to help 13 and 14 year olds to foster conceptual understanding and modelling skills in an integrated manner in the domain of 1D collisions. Through the model‐based curriculum students are also expected to appreciate the important role of conservation laws in science as a fundamental principle in analysing process end states. We will also present some preliminary pre‐test results related to our threefold objective.
    International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning 01/2005; 15(1/2):95-107.
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    ABSTRACT: New technologies and the Internet have contributed to modify teaching methods. This paper describes an educational project to redefine the contents of some undergraduate courses of Mathematics with an high integration of new technologies at the Academy of Architecture of Mendrisio (University of Italian Switzerland). In particular, an innovative approach in the course of Mathematical Thought will be explained, where the use the new media, for dealing with some mathematical concepts with philosophic, artistic and architectural connections (for example, the groups of symmetry, the golden section, the Fibonacci’s sequence, and fractal geometry). The contents of mathematics are redefined in this paper for specific course of architecture. It is a new approach with a strong collaboration with other courses (for example, architectural design, technology, ecology). By utilizing this approach, the author proposed that the use new media will enhance the teaching methods. By incorporating particular lecture organization, it is possible to integrate different media (for example, scientific documentaries, hypertext, hypermedia, animations, virtual reality). It has been observed that new media can introduce more interaction than traditional teaching approach and they can help to realise an incisive lesson.
    International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning 04/2003; 13(3/4):303-317.
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    ABSTRACT: The importance of a facilitator in collaborative learning environments is well known. Nevertheless, computer‐based learning environments still lack support for the activities carried out by people in charge of facilitating collaboration among learners. This paper focuses on the interactions taking place in collaborative learning situations, aiming at proposing mechanisms to support the facilitator in computer‐based environments. We proposed a conceptual framework to analyse interaction among people in a learning situation mediated by a chat tool. This conceptual framework has proved useful to study aspects such as the dynamics of interactions, the nature and characteristics of conversations, the roles of the participants towards collaboration. Two different contexts of usage were analysed according to this framework. The results of these analyses have been applied to some recommendations for the design of tools to support the facilitator in analysing and promoting collaboration among learners.
    International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning 01/2003; 13.

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