Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Society for Biomaterials; Nihon Baiomateriaru Gakkai; Australian Society for Biomaterials; Korean Society for Biomaterials, Wiley

Journal description

Applied Biomaterials is published as Part B of the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, an official journal of the Society For Biomaterials, the Japanese Society for Biomaterials, the Australasian Society for Biomaterials, and the Korean Society for Biomaterials. It is a peer-reviewed journal serving the needs of biomaterials professionals who devise, promote, apply, regulate, produce, and market new biomaterials and medical devices. It is international and interdisciplinary in scope. Papers are published on device development, implant retrieval and analysis, manufacturing, regulation of devices, liability and legal issues, standards, reviews of different device areas, and clinical applications.

Current impact factor: 2.33

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.328
2012 Impact Factor 2.308
2011 Impact Factor 2.147
2010 Impact Factor 2.22
2009 Impact Factor 2.185
2008 Impact Factor 2.03
2007 Impact Factor 1.933
2006 Impact Factor 1.778
2005 Impact Factor 1.621
2004 Impact Factor 1.105

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.52
Cited half-life 4.80
Immediacy index 0.26
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 0.67
Website Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials website
Other titles Journal of biomedical materials research., Journal of biomedical materials research. Part B, Applied biomaterials, Applied biomaterials
ISSN 1552-4981
OCLC 51823311
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley

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    • 12 months embargo
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    • On author's personal website, institutional repositories, arXiv, AgEcon, PhilPapers, PubMed Central, RePEc or Social Science Research Network
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    • On a non-profit server
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    • Must link to publisher version with set statement (see policy)
    • If OnlineOpen is available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • If OnlineOpen is available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 24 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 07/08/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • Melanie J Coathup, Thomas C Edwards, Sorousheh Samizadeh, Wei-Jen Lo, Gordon W Blunn
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the osteoconductive properties of a porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold manufactured using a novel technique similar to the bread-making process, alone and in combination with an alginate polysaccharide fiber gel (HA/APFG putty) and autologous bone marrow aspirate (BMA). The hypothesis was that the HA/APFG putty would be as osteoconductive as granular HA and that the presence of BMA would further enhance bone formation in an ovine femoral condyle critical defect model. Thirty-six defects were created and either (1) porous HA granules, (2) HA/APFG putty, or (3) HA/APFG putty + BMA were implanted. After retrieval at 6 and 12 weeks, image analysis techniques were used to quantify bone apposition rates, new bone area, bone-HA scaffold contact, and implant resorption. At 6 weeks postsurgery, significantly lower bone apposition rates were observed in the HA/APFG putty group when compared to the HA (p = 0.014) and HA/APFG putty + BMA (p = 0.014) groups. At 12 weeks, significantly increased amounts of new bone formation were measured within the HA scaffold (33.56 ± 3.53%) when compared to both the HA/APFG putty (16.69 ± 2.7%; p = 0.043) and the defects containing HA/APFG putty + BMA (19.31 ± 3.8%; p = 0.043). The use of an APFG gel as a carrier for injectable CaP bone substitute materials delayed bone formation in this model compared to HA granules alone which enhanced bone formation especially within the interconnected smaller pores. Our results also showed that the addition of autologous BMA did not further enhance its osteoconductive properties. Further study is required to optimize the degradation rate of this APFG binding agent before using as a directly injectable material for repair of bone defect. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33395
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    ABSTRACT: Development of drug-delivery devices typically involves characterizing in vitro release performance with the inherent assumption that this will closely approximate in vivo performance. Yet, as delivery devices become more complex, for instance with a sequential drug release pattern, it is important to confirm that in vivo properties correlate with the expected "programming" achieved in vitro. In this work, a systematic comparison between in vitro and in vivo biomaterial erosion and sequential release was performed for a multilayered association polymer system comprising cellulose acetate phthalate and Pluronic F-127. After assessing the materials during incubation in phosphate-buffered saline, devices were implanted supracalvarially in rats. Devices with two different doses and with different erosion rates were harvested at increasing times post-implantation, and the in vivo thickness loss, mass loss, and the drug release profiles were compared with their in vitro counterparts. The sequential release of four different drugs observed in vitro was successfully translated to in vivo conditions. Results suggest, however, that the total erosion time of the devices was longer and that release rates of the four drugs were different, with drugs initially released more quickly and then more slowly in vivo. Many comparative studies of in vitro and in vivo drug release from biodegradable polymers involved a single drug, whereas this research demonstrated that sequential release of four drugs can be maintained following implantation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33472
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to obtain and to investigate nano forsterite and nano forsterite biocomposites for biomedical application. New self-curing forsterite biocomposites were obtained by mixing nano forsterite powder (5, 15, 30, 50, 70 wt %) with 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)-phenyl]propane (bis-GMA) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. The new nano forsterite biocomposites were investigated for mechanical properties: compressive strength (CS) (143-147.12 MPa), compressive modulus (CM) (1.67-2.75 GPa), diametral tensile strength (DTS) (27.33-31.55 MPa), flexural strength (FS) (59.47-83.20 MPa) and flexural modulus (FM) (2.05-8.60 GPa). Increases of CS, DTS, FS with increasing amount of forsterite were observed up to 50 wt %. The highest CM and FM values were registered for 70 wt % and a direct correlation between the forsterite volume fraction (%) was observed. SEM micrographs revealed the morphology of surface of fractured biocomposites after CS test. XPS indicated that these biocomposites promoted the hydroxyapatite formation on their surface immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF). AFM images showed that the growth of the hydroxyapatite layer occurs with a preferred orientation on the surface of forsterite biocomposites after immersion in SBF. Incorporation of nano forsterite in the polymer matrix (bis-GMA/TEGDMA) did show osteoblast adhesion and proliferation was improved on nano forsterite biocomposites. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33396
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    ABSTRACT: The aims of this study were to evaluate in vivo the biological responses to implants composed of biodegradable anodized WE43 (containing magnesium yttrium, rare earth elements and zirconium; Elektron SynerMag®) magnesium alloy, monolithic WE43 magnesium alloy and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA), which are commonly used materials in clinic settings, and to evaluate the effectiveness of the materials as bone screws. The effectiveness of the magnesium alloy implants in osteosynthesis was evaluated using a bone fracture model involving the tibia of beagle dogs. For the monolithic WE43 implants, radiological, and histological evaluation revealed that bone trabeculae around the implanted monolithic WE43 decreased because of an inflammatory response. However, there was no damage due to hydrogen gas or inflammatory response in the bone tissue around the anodized WE43 implants. After 4 weeks, all the PLLA implants (n = 3) had broken but the WE43 implants had not (n = 6). These results suggest that the WE43 implants had sufficient strength to fix bone fractures at load-bearing sites in orthopedic and oral maxillofacial surgery. Therefore, these biodegradable magnesium alloys are good candidates for replacing biodegradable polymers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33470
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    ABSTRACT: The tissue integration and the formation of adhesions in the repair of abdominal wall defects are principally led to the topology and the mechanical properties of implanted prosthesis. In this study we analyzed the influence of the topology of the meshes for abdominal wall repair, made of polypropylene (PP), evaluating its ability to prevent and to minimize the formation of adhesions, and to promote tissue ingrowth. Two series of in vivo studies were performed. In the first, two types of PP meshes, a lightweight macroporous mesh (LWM) and a heavyweight microporous mesh (HWM) were compared with determine the optimal porosity for tissue integration. In the second, a composite mesh, Clear Mesh Composite (CMC), made of a LWM sewn on a PP planar smooth film, was compared with a PP planar film, to demonstrate how two different topologies of same material are able to induce different tissue integration with the abdominal wall and different adhesion with internal organs. In both studies, the prostheses were implanted in Wistar rats and histological analysis and mechanical characterization of tissue coupled with the implants were performed. LWM showed better host tissue ingrowth in comparison to HWM. CMC prosthesis showed no adhesions to the viscera and no strong foreign body reaction, moreover its elasticity and anisotropy index were more similar to that of natural tissue. These results demonstrated that the surface morphology of PP surgical meshes allowed to modulate their repair ability. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33468
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    ABSTRACT: Tissue engineering hydrogels are primarily cured in situ using ultraviolet (UV) radiation which limits the use of hydrogels as drug or cell carriers. Visible green light activated crosslinking systems are presented as a safe alternative to UV photocrosslinked hydrogels, without compromising material properties such as viscosity and stiffness. The objective of this study was to fabricate and characterize photocrosslinked hydrogels with well-regulated gelation kinetics and mechanical properties for the repair or replacement of soft tissue. An anhydrous methacrylation of hyaluronan (HA) was performed to control the degree of modification (DOM) of HA, verified by (1) H-NMR spectroscopy. UV-activated crosslinking was compared to visible green light activated crosslinking. While the different photocrosslinking techniques resulted in varied crosslinking times, comparable mechanical properties of UV and green light activated crosslinked hydrogels were achieved using each photocrosslinking method by adjusting time of light exposure. Methacrylated HA (HA-MA) hydrogels of varying molecular weight, DOM, and concentration exhibited compressive moduli ranging from 1 kPa to 116 kPa, for UV crosslinking, and 3 kPa to 146 kPa, for green light crosslinking. HA-MA molecular weight and concentration were found to significantly influence moduli values. HA-MA hydrogels did not exhibit any significant cytotoxic effects toward human mesenchymal stem cells. Green light activated crosslinking systems are presented as a viable method to form natural-based hydrogels in situ. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33476
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    ABSTRACT: A three-phase [nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA), carbon nanotubes (CNT), mixed in a polymeric matrix of polycaprolactone (PCL)] composite scaffold produced by 3D printing is presented. The CNT content varied between 0 and 10 wt % in a 50 wt % PCL matrix, with HA being the balance. With the combination of three well-known materials, these scaffolds aimed at bringing together the properties of all into a unique material to be used in tissue engineering as support for cell growth. The 3D printing technique allows producing composite scaffolds having an interconnected network of square pores in the range of 450-700 μm. The 2 wt % CNT scaffold offers the best combination of mechanical behaviour and electrical conductivity. Its compressive strength of ∼4 MPa is compatible with the trabecular bone. The composites show typical hydroxyapatite bioactivity, good cell adhesion and spreading at the scaffolds surface, this combination of properties indicating that the produced 3D, three-phase, scaffolds are promising materials in the field of bone regenerative medicine. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33432
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    ABSTRACT: Corrosion behavior and microcleanliness of medical-device grade Nitinol tubing (Nix Ti1- x , x = 0.51; outer diameter 7 mm, wall thickness 0.5 mm), drawn from various ingot qualities, are compared to the characteristics of sputtered Nitinol film material (Nix Ti1- x , x = 0.51; thickness 50 µm). Electropolished tubing half-shell samples are tested versus as-received sputtered film samples. Inclusion size distributions are assessed using quantitative metallography and corrosion behavior is investigated by potentiodynamic polarization testing in phosphate-buffered saline at body temperature. For the sputtered film samples, the surface chemistry is additionally analyzed employing Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) composition-depth profiling. Results show that the fraction of breakdowns in the potentiodynamic polarization test correlates with number and size of the inclusions in the material. For the sputtered Nitinol film material no inclusions were detectable by light microscopy on the one hand and no breakdowns were found in the potentiodynamic polarization test on the other hand. As for electropolished Nitinol, the sputtered Nitinol film material reveals Nickel depletion and an Oxygen-to-Titanium intensity ratio of ∼2:1 in the surface oxide layer, as measured by AES. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33449
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to determine healing patterns in periimplant gap defect grafted with demineralized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) and porous titanium granules (PTG), which are known to induce a minimal tissue reaction and to undergo minimal biodegradation in healing process. Experiments were performed using a standardized periimplant gap-defect model in dogs with two observational periods: 4 and 8 weeks. Circumferential defects were surgically induced around dental implants on unilateral mandibles in five dogs, and collagen barrier membranes were placed over the DBBM and PTG grafts at two experimental sites and over a nongrafted site. Four weeks later, the same procedures were performed on the contralateral mandible, and the animals allowed to heal for a further 4 weeks, after which they were sacrificed and their mandibles with graft/control sites harvested for histologic evaluation. Both types of grafted biomaterials significantly enhanced the defect fill with newly formed bone, but the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) was significantly increased only at sites that had been grafted with DBBM. The two experimental sites exhibited different healing patterns, with new bone formation being observed on the surface of the DBBM particles throughout the defect, while there was no de novo bone formation on the PTG surface, but rather appositional bone growth from the base and lateral walls of the defect. It has been suggested that gap-defect filling with DBBM around dental implants may enhance both BIC and defect fill; however, the present findings show that defect grafting with PTG enhances only defect fill and not BIC. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33433
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    ABSTRACT: A new sacrificial molding process using a single mask has been developed to fabricate ultrathin 2-dimensional membranes from several biocompatible polymeric materials. The fabrication process is similar to a sacrificial microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) process flow, where a mold is created from a material that can be coated with a biodegradable polymer and subsequently etched away, leaving behind a very thin polymer membrane. In this work, two different sacrificial mold materials, silicon dioxide (SiO2 ) and Liftoff Resist (LOR) were used. Three different biodegradable materials; polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and polyglycidyl methacrylate (PGMA), were chosen as model polymers. We demonstrate that this process is capable of fabricating 200-500 nm thin, through-hole polymer membranes with various geometries, pore-sizes and spatial features approaching 2.5 µm using a mold fabricated via a single contact photolithography exposure. In addition, the membranes can be mounted to support rings made from either SU8 or PCL for easy handling after release. Cell culture compatibility of the fabricated membranes was evaluated with human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) seeded onto the ultrathin porous membranes, where the cells grew and formed confluent layers with well-established cell-cell contacts. Furthermore, human trabecular meshwork cells (HTMCs) cultured on these scaffolds showed similar proliferation as on flat PCL substrates, further validating its compatibility. All together, these results demonstrated the feasibility of our sacrificial fabrication process to produce biocompatible, ultra-thin membranes with defined microstructures (i.e., pores) with the potential to be used as substrates for tissue engineering applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33464
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bone formation capability of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK (CFR-PEEK) implants coated with different titanium and hydroxyapatite plasma-sprayed layers after 2 and 12 weeks. In six sheep 108 implants were placed in the pelvis. Altogether six different surface modifications were tested. After 2 and 12 weeks, n = 3 implants per group were examined histologically and n = 6 implants per group were tested by a pull-out test. Biomechanically (p = 0.001) as well as histologically (p > 0.05) surface coating of PEEK/CFR-PEEK led to an increase of osseointegration from 2 to 12 weeks. After 12 weeks, coated implants demonstrated significant (p < 0.001) higher pull-out values in comparison to uncoated implants. Overall, the double coating (titanium bond layer and hydroxyapatite top layer) showed the most favorable results after 2 and 12 weeks. Plasma-sprayed titanium and hydroxyapatite coatings on PEEK or CFR-PEEK demonstrated a significant improvement of osseointegration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33471
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    ABSTRACT: Particle-induced osteolysis is a major issue, and it is most likely the result of enhanced osteoclast activation in the pathogenesis of various skeletal diseases. This study investigated whether the inhibitory effect that Polycan has on osteoclast differentiation can be used to treat osteolysis induced by titanium (Ti) particles. To this end, the effects of Polycan were examined in terms of the cytotoxicity, osteoclast differentiation, cytokine expression, and Ti-induced calvarial osteolysis. Polycan had no significant cytotoxic effects on bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) but instead increased BMM proliferation. High levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) were expressed in BMM cells in the presence of Polycan, suggesting that Polycan drives the differentiation of BMMs into M1 macrophages. Polycan significantly inhibited osteoclast differentiation induced by M-CSF and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The expression levels of the osteoclast marker genes significantly decreased, and Polycan induced and maintained the expression of IL-12, which suppressed osteoclast differentiation. In contrast, the RANKL signaling pathway was not inhibited by Polycan. An in vivo calvarial osteolysis model revealed that Polycan significantly decreased the osteoclast numbers and suppressed osteolysis. Our results suggest that the natural compound Polycan is a good candidate for therapeutic intervention against enhanced osteoclast differentiation and Ti particle-induced osteolysis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33415
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    ABSTRACT: Biomaterial development is currently the most active research area in the field of biomedical engineering. The bioglasses possess immense potential for being the ideal biomaterials due to their high adaptiveness to the biological environment as well as tunable properties. Bioglasses like 45S5 has shown great clinical success over the past 10 years. The bioglasses like 45S5 were prepared using melt-quenching techniques but recently porous bioactive glasses have been derived through sol-gel process. The synthesis route exhibits marked effect on the specific surface area, as well as degradability of the material. This article is an attempt to provide state of the art of the sol-gel and melt quenched bioactive bioglasses for tissue regeneration. Fabrication routes for bioglasses suitable for bone tissue engineering are highlighted and the effect of these fabrication techniques on the porosity, pore-volume, mechanical properties, cytocompatibilty and especially apatite layer formation on the surface of bioglasses is analyzed in detail. Drug delivery capability of bioglasses is addressed shortly along with the bioactivity of mesoporous glasses. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33443
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    ABSTRACT: The initial degradation of zinc has been investigated through exposures to simulated and real body fluids of increasing complexity: phosphate buffered saline (PBS), Ringer's saline solution, human plasma, and whole blood. Real body fluids were used to close the electrolyte gap between simulated and in vivo environment. Polarization of zinc in whole blood show a passive response not present in other electrolytes. The analysis shows a decrease in corrosion rate with time for plasma and whole blood and an increase for PBS and Ringer's. During exposure to plasma and whole blood a bi-layered corrosion product with poor adherence was formed over a uniformly corroding surface. The corrosion products comprise a mixture of inorganic material and biomolecules. Samples degrading in PBS were prone to localized corrosion and formed thick porous corrosion products of primarily zinc phosphates while in Ringer's solution a gel like layer of zinc carbonate was formed over an interface with shallow pits. The use of whole blood or plasma as electrolytes for short term in vitro evaluation of potential biodegradable metals may provide an improved understanding of the behavior in vivo, while Ringer's solution is preferred over PBS for long term degradation studies of zinc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33458
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    ABSTRACT: Hydrogels are widely used in the biomedical field. Their main purposes are either to deliver biological active agents or to temporarily fill a defect until they degrade and are followed by new host tissue formation. However, for this latter application, biodegradable hydrogels are usually not capable to sustain any significant load. The development of biodegradable hydrogels presenting load-bearing capabilities would open new possibilities to utilize this class of material in the biomedical field. In this work, an original formulation of biodegradable photo-crosslinked hydrogels based on hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) is presented. The hydrogels consist of short-length poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) chains in a star shape structure, obtained by introducing a tetra-functional chain transfer agent in the backbone of the hydrogels. They are cross-linked with a biodegradable N,O-dimethacryloyl hydroxylamine (DMHA) molecule sensitive to hydrolytic cleavage. We characterized the degradation properties of these hydrogels submitted to mechanical loadings. We showed that the developed hydrogels undergo long-term degradation and specially meet the two essential requirements of a biodegradable hydrogel suitable for load bearing applications: enhanced mechanical properties and low molecular weight degradation products. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33469
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    ABSTRACT: Antioxidant stabilized highly crosslinked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) components have been in clinical use since 2008. In vitro testing has shown excellent oxidation resistance, wear resistance, mechanical properties, and fatigue strength. In this study, we analyzed surgically retrieved components to investigate in vivo behavior and changes in the material. Fifteen surgically retrieved, vitamin E-stabilized, and radiation crosslinked UHMWPE components were analyzed to determine their oxidative stability, extent of lipid absorption in vivo, free radical content, hydroperoxide index, and extent of visible wear damage after in vivo service (0.1-36.6 months). Retrievals showed no significant carbonyls at the time of surgical removal, while free radical content was observed to decay with increasing in vivo duration. There was no increase in hydroperoxide index. Lipid penetration increased with time. Ex vivo oxidation was not observed after 18 months of aging in air at room temperature. The free-radical scavenging activity of the vitamin E appears to successfully prevent both in vivo and ex vivo oxidation for short durations, while reducing free radical content overall. Without an increase in hydroperoxides, the oxidation cascade initiated by radiation-induced and lipid-derived free radicals appears to have been inhibited. Further investigation is required with longer duration implants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33465
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    ABSTRACT: The regenerative pathways during periosteal distraction osteogenesis may be influenced by the local environment composed by cells, growth factors, nutrition and mechanical load. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of two protocols of periosteal distraction on bone formation. Custom made distraction devices were surgically fixed onto the calvariae of 60 rabbits. After an initial healing period of 7 days, two groups of animals were submitted to distraction rates of 0.25 and 0.5 mm/24 h for 10 days, respectively. Six animals per group were sacrificed 10 (mid-distraction), 17 (end-distraction), 24 (1-week consolidation), 31 (2-week consolidation) and 77 days (2-month consolidation) after surgery. Newly formed bone was assessed by means of micro-CT and histologically. Expression of transcripts encoding tissue-specific genes (BMP-2, RUNX2, ACP5, SPARC, collagen I α1, collagen II α1 and SOX9) was analyzed by quantitative PCR. Two patterns of bone formation were observed, originating from the old bone surface in Group I and from the periosteum in Group II. Bone volume (BV) and bone mineral density (BMD) significantly increased up to the 2-month consolidation period within the groups (p < 0.05). Significantly more bone was observed in Group II compared to Group I at the 2-month consolidation period (p < 0.001). Expression of transcripts encoding osteogenic genes in bone depended on the time-point of observation (p < 0.05). Low level of transcripts reveals an indirect role of periosteum in the osteogenic process. Two protocols of periosteal distraction in the present model resulted in moderate differences in terms of bone formation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33461
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    ABSTRACT: Drug-eluting stents (DES) have been widely used to treat coronary artery disease (CAD) since their clinical use has significantly reduced the occurrence of in-stent restenosis (ISR) as compared with the initially applied bare-metal stents (BMS). However, analyses of long-term clinical outcome have raised concerns about the serious safety problem of DES, such as ISR caused by late or very late thrombosis. Various studies showed that those complications were associated with vascular endothelial injury/dysfunction or endothelialization delaying. Recently, through biological characterization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), mechanistic understanding of rapid re-endothelialization of the vascular injury sites after coronary stenting has become possible and is a new research hotspot in the prevention of ISR and late/very late stent thrombosis. It has been well recognized that the formation of a functional endothelial layer from EPCs requires a coordinated sequence of multistep and signaling events, which includes cell mobilization, adhesion, migration and finally the differentiation to vascular endothelial cells (VECs). In this review, we summarize and discuss the currently relevant information about EPCs, the mechanism of DES interfering with the natural vascular healing process in preventing or delaying the formation of a functional endothelial layer, and EPCs-mediated acceleration of re-endothelialization at vascular injury sites. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 06/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33398
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    ABSTRACT: Bone substitutes are required to repair osseous defects caused by a number of factors, such as traumas, degenerative diseases, and cancer. Autologous bone grafting is typically used to bridge bone defects, but suffers from chronic pain at the donor-site and limited availability of graft material. Tissue engineering approaches are being investigated as viable alternatives, which ideal scaffold should be biocompatible, biodegradable, and promote cellular interactions and tissue development, need to present proper mechanical and physical properties. In this study, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), oleic acid (OA) and hydroxyapatite (HAp) were used to obtain films whose properties were investigated by contact angle, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, tensile mechanical tests, and in vitro tests with U2OS human osteosarcoma cells by direct contact. Our results indicate that by using OA as surfactant/dispersant, it was possible to obtain a homogenous film with HAp. The PCL/OA/Hap sample had twice the roughness of the control (PCL) and a lower contact angle, indicating increased hydrophilicity of the film. Furthermore, mechanical testing showed that the addition of HAp decreased the load at yield point and tensile strength and increased tensile modulus, indicating a more brittle composition vs. PCL matrix. Preliminary cell culture experiments carried out with the films demonstrated that U2OS cells adhered and proliferated on all surfaces. The data demonstrate the improved dispersion of HAp using OA and the important consequences of this addition on the composite, unveiling the potentially of this composition for bone growth support. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 05/2015; DOI:10.1002/jbm.b.33457