Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials (J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater )

Publisher: Society for Biomaterials; Nihon Baiomateriaru Gakkai; Australian Society for Biomaterials; Korean Society for Biomaterials, John Wiley & Sons

Description

Applied Biomaterials is published as Part B of the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, an official journal of the Society For Biomaterials, the Japanese Society for Biomaterials, the Australasian Society for Biomaterials, and the Korean Society for Biomaterials. It is a peer-reviewed journal serving the needs of biomaterials professionals who devise, promote, apply, regulate, produce, and market new biomaterials and medical devices. It is international and interdisciplinary in scope. Papers are published on device development, implant retrieval and analysis, manufacturing, regulation of devices, liability and legal issues, standards, reviews of different device areas, and clinical applications.

  • Impact factor
    2.31
  • 5-year impact
    2.52
  • Cited half-life
    4.80
  • Immediacy index
    0.26
  • Eigenfactor
    0.02
  • Article influence
    0.67
  • Website
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials website
  • Other titles
    Journal of biomedical materials research., Journal of biomedical materials research. Part B, Applied biomaterials, Applied biomaterials
  • ISSN
    1552-4981
  • OCLC
    51823311
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

John Wiley & Sons

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • On personal web site or secure external website at authors institution
    • Not allowed on institutional repository
    • JASIST authors may deposit in an institutional repository
    • Non-commercial
    • Pre-print must be accompanied with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'John Wiley and Sons' is an imprint of 'Wiley-Blackwell'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study is to investigate the in vitro tribological behavior of modern nonmetallic restorative materials. Specimen prepared of IPS e.max Press lithium disilicate glass ceramic, IPS Empress Esthetic leucite-reinforced glass ceramic, Everest ZS Blanks yttria-stabilized zirconia and Lava Ultimate composite were subjected to wear using a wear machine designed to simulate occlusal loads. The wear of the investigated materials and antagonists were evaluated by a three-dimensional surface scanner. The quantitative wear test results were used to compare and rank the materials. Specimens were divided into two groups with steatite and alumina antagonists. For each antagonist material an analysis of variance was applied. As a post hoc test of the significant differences, Tukey's honest significant difference test was used. With steatite antagonist: wear of zirconia < wear of leucite-reinforced ceramic < wear of lithium disilicate ceramic < wear of Lava Ultimate composite. No significant wear difference was found for steatite antagonist. The wear of IPS e.max Press and Lava Ultimate against hard alumina was found to be twice lower as compared to their wear when opposing to steatite. The differences were associated with materials mechanical properties (hardness and fracture toughness) and with materials microstructure. Wear mechanisms are discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This article presents the concept of an implantable cage system that can house and protect implanted biomedical sensing and therapeutic devices in the body. Cylinder-shaped cages made of porous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sheets with an 80-µm pore size and/or stainless steel meshes with 0.54-mm openings were implanted subcutaneously in the dorsal region of rats for 5 weeks. Analysis of the explanted cages showed the formation of fibrosis tissue around the cages. PVA cages had fibrotic tissue growing mostly along the outer surface of cages, while stainless steel cages had fibrotic tissue growing into the inside surface of the cage structure, due to the larger porosity of the stainless steel meshes. As the detection of target molecules with short time lags for biosensors and mass transport with low diffusion resistance into and out of certain therapeutic devices are critical for the success of such devices, we examined whether the fibrous tissue formed around the cages were permeable to molecules of our interest. For that purpose, bath diffusion and microfluidic chamber diffusion experiments using solutions containing the target molecules were performed. Diffusion of sodium, potassium and urea through the fibrosis tissue was confirmed, thus suggesting the potential of these cylindrical cages surrounded by fibrosis tissue to successfully encase implantable sensors and therapeutic apparatus. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: AimsTo analyze the effects of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro and investigate in vivo bone formation by MSC sheets with PRF.Materials and Methods Cell proliferation and expression of osteogenesis-related genes within MSC sheets were assessed upon exposure to PRF from the same donors. We then injected MSC sheet fragments with or without PRF subcutaneously in nude mice and assessed bone formation by micro-computed tomography and histological analyses.ResultsPRF significantly stimulated MSC proliferation and osteogenesis in vitro. MSC sheets injected with or without PRF formed new bone, but those with PRF produced significantly more and denser bone.ConclusionsMSC sheets can be used to generate tissue engineered bone upon injection, and PRF increases the osteogenic capacity of MSC sheets in vitro and in vivo. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, chitosan-based hydrogels were formulated with material similarities to three of the four zones of articular cartilage. Gelatin, hyaluronic acid (HA), and β-tricalcium phosphate for the superficial, radial, and calcified zones, were blended in different amounts and tested for formation of uniform solution, gelability, and rheological characteristics. Confined compression in two configurations (series and parallel to anisotropy), and cyclical tests were performed at the physiological conditions. In vivo gelation and systemic effects were evaluated in male BALB/c mice subcutaneous model. At day 5, hydrogels were harvested along with the adjoining skin and analyzed by histology. Formulations that produced solutions after pH adjustments were selected for each zone. Anisotropic hydrogels were formed by mixing solutions from each zone, which showed uniform gradation. Addition of HA improved structural integrity relative to other formulations. When hydrogels were in series, combined hydrogel modulus was the average of all zones while that in parallel orientation was half of that series orientation. Cyclical tests demonstrated repeatable strength and durability. All formulations were injectable into the subcutaneous region. H/E stained tissues showed minimal invasion of inflammatory cells in radial and calcified zones. Structural integrity of the hydrogel is suggested to be the resultant of the presence of HA. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: One of the desired properties for any new biomaterial composition is its long-term stability in a suitable animal model and such property cannot be appropriately assessed by performing short-term implantation studies. While hydroxyapatite (HA) or bioglass coated metallic biomaterials are being investigated for in vivo biocompatibility properties, such study is not extensively being pursued for bulk glass ceramics. In view of their inherent brittle nature, the implant stability as well as impact of long-term release of metallic ions on bone regeneration have been a major concern. In this perspective, the present article reports the results of the in vivo implantation experiments carried out using 100% strontium (Sr)-substituted glass ceramics with the nominal composition of 4.5 SiO2–3Al2O3–1.5P2O5–3SrO–2SrF2 for 26 weeks in cylindrical bone defects in rabbit model. The combination of histological and micro-computed tomography analysis provided a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the bone regeneration around the glass ceramic implants in comparison to the highly bioactive HA bioglass implants (control). The sequential polychrome labeling of bone during in vivo osseointegration using three fluorochromes followed by fluorescence microscopy observation confirmed homogeneous bone formation around the test implants. The results of the present study unequivocally confirm the long-term implant stability as well as osteoconductive property of 100% Sr-substituted glass ceramics, which is comparable to that of a known bioactive implant, that is, HA-based bioglass. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In this article, conductive hollow fibers have been fabricated using melt spinning technique. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) have been used to fabricate conductive poly-caprolactone (PCL) composites. The hollow fibers have inner and outer diameter in the range of 300 µm and 500 µm, respectively. Critical parameters to tune the dimension of hollow fibers have been defined following two-dimensions mathematical model. Evaluation of the mechanical properties showed that the incorporation of 1–3 wt % MWNTs and 5–8 wt % P3HT increased Young Modulus of 10% and 20% respectively, compared with pure PCL. The electrical property assessment demonstrated that a minimum incorporation of 3 wt % MWNT and 8 wt % P3HT in PCL matrix transformed composite materials into conductive materials. In addition, SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells were seeded on the fabricated samples an their adhesion, proliferation and neurite length growth were analysed. In particular we observed that these materials promoted cell activities and in particular on MWNT/PCL composites there was a significant increase of neurite growth. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Coprecipitation of FeCl2 and FeCl3 with aqueous ammonia was used to prepare iron oxide nanoparticles dispersible in aqueous medium. Oxidation of the particles with sodium hypochlorite then yielded maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles which were coated with two types of coating –d-mannose or poly(l-lysine) (PLL) as confirmed by FTIR analysis. The particles were <10 nm according to transmission electron microscopy. Their hydrodynamic particle size was ∼180 nm (by dynamic light scattering). The d-mannose-, PLL-coated, and neat γ-Fe2O3 particles as well as commercial Resovist® were used to label rat macrophages. The viability and contrast properties of labeled macrophages were compared. PLL-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were found optimal. The labeled macrophages were injected to rats monitored in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging up to 48 h. Transport of macrophages labeled with PLL-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in rats was confirmed. Tracking of macrophages using the developed particles can be used for monitoring of inflammations and cell migration in cell therapy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background and objective: Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylases stimulates bone regeneration. Consequently, bone substitute materials were developed that release prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors. However, the impact of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors released from these carriers on osteoclastogenesis is not clear. We therefore assessed the effect of bone substitute materials that release prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors on osteoclastogenesis. Material and methods: Dimethyloxalylglycine, desferrioxamine, and l-mimosine were lyophilized onto bovine bone mineral and hydroxyapatite, and supernatants were generated. Osteoclastogenesis was induced in murine bone marrow cultures in the presence of the supernatants from bone substitute materials. The formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells and TRAP activity were determined. To test for possible effects on osteoclast progenitor cells, we measured the effect of the supernatants on proliferation and viability. In addition, experiments were performed where prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors were directly added to the bone marrow cultures. Results: We found that prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors released within the first hours from bone substitute materials reduce the number and activity of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells. In line with this, addition of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors directly to the bone marrow cultures dose-dependently reduced the number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells and the overall resorption activity. Moreover, the released prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors decreased proliferation but not viability of osteoclast progenitor cells. Conclusion: Our results show that prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors released from bone substitute materials decrease osteoclastogenesis in murine bone marrow cultures. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Ionically crosslinked alginate hydrogels have been extensively explored for encapsulation and immunoisolation of living cells/tissues to develop implantable cell therapies, such as islet encapsulation for bioartificial pancreas. Chemical instability of these hydrogels during long-term implantation hinders the development of viable cell therapy. The exchange between divalent crosslinking ions (e.g., Ca+2) with monovalent ions from physiological environment causes alginate hydrogels to degrade, resulting in exposure of the donor tissue to the host's immune system and graft failure. The goal of this study was to improve stability of alginate hydrogels by utilizing covalent “click” crosslinking while preserving other biomedically viable hydrogel properties. Alginate was first functionalized to contain either pendant alkyne or azide functionalities, and subsequently reacted via “click” chemistry to form “click” gel capsules. Alginate functionalization was confirmed by NMR and gel permeation chromatography. When compared with Ca+2 capsules, “click” capsules exhibited superior stability in ionic media, while showing higher permeability to small size diffusants and similar molecular weight cut-off and water swelling. Physicochemical properties of “click” alginate hydrogels demonstrate their potential utility for therapeutic cell encapsulation and other biomedical applications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 10/2014;
  • Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The material surface plays an important role in the case of biomaterials used as tissue engineering scaffolds. On exposure to a biological environment, extra cellular matrix (ECM) proteins are adsorbed non-specifically onto the surface and cells interact indirectly with the surface through the adsorbed proteins. Most synthetic polymeric biomaterials lack the desirable surface properties for cells as well as have poor cellular adhesion due to their hydrophobic nature. The main objective of this study was to harness surface functionalization technologies to fabricate scaffolds that would be biocompatible and support the adhesion and proliferation of fibroblast cells. The collagen was immobilized on the surface of functionalized PLA via a novel natural cross-linking molecule genipin which resulted in improved cell proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts as compared to the PLA surface coated with collagen without genipin. It is believed that genipin helps reduce steric problems between the functional groups and large protein molecules, and enables immobilized peptide to move more freely in a biological environment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Polymeric scaffolds used in regenerative therapies are implanted in the damaged tissue and submitted to repeated loading cycles. In the case of articular cartilage engineering, an implanted scaffold is typically subjected to long-term dynamic compression. The evolution of the mechanical properties of the scaffold during bioresorption has been deeply studied in the past, but the possibility of failure due to mechanical fatigue has not been properly addressed. Nevertheless, the macroporous scaffold is susceptible to failure after repeated loading-unloading cycles. In this work fatigue studies of polycaprolactone scaffolds were carried by subjecting the scaffold to repeated compression cycles in conditions simulating the scaffold implanted in the articular cartilage. The behavior of the polycaprolactone sponge with the pores filled with a poly(vinyl alcohol) gel simulating the new formed tissue within the pores was compared with that of the material immersed in water. Results were analyzed with Morrow's criteria for failure and accurate fittings are obtained just up to 200 loading cycles. It is also shown that the presence of poly(vinyl alcohol) increases the elastic modulus of the scaffolds, the effect being more pronounced with increasing the number of freeze/thawing cycles. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: New formulations of acrylic bone cements for bone defect reparation, based on self-hardening methyl methacrylate (MMA)/methacrylic acid (MAA), with a high capacity for protein delivery, have been developed. The self-curing formulations were prepared by partial substitution of solid phase PMMA microparticles by newly obtained PMAA microspheres. The PMAA microspheres were prepared by inverse suspension polymerization of their monomer and were cross-linked with N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide (MBA) (10-15 wt %) to produce stable systems in contact with aqueous media. PMAA microspheres were loaded with hydrolyzed collagen (HC) as a model protein to simulate bone morphogenetic protein delivery useful for hard tissue reconstruction. Solid phase PMMA microparticles in the formulation were partially substituted by new PMAA-HC microspheres and were characterized to determine viability as an acrylic bone cement in minimally invasive surgery. The incorporation of PMAA-HC microspheres decreased peak temperature by 20°C, which minimized thermal necrotic risk after implantation. Mechanical compression tests revealed a behavior, under dry conditions, close to ISO 5833 standard requirements. However, a drastic drop in mechanical strength, ∼64%, was obtained after 15 days of immersion in simulated physiological conditions (37°C and pH 7.4) and was attributed to water absorption and a subsequent plasticizing effect. The increase in water uptake and retention enhanced the capability for controlled protein delivery. Finally, the biocompatibility of the cements was determined; some toxicity of the material during the first hours of culture incubation was observed. Later, toxicity was observed to decrease due to nonreacted monomer leaching, which ensured the low toxicity of the already polymerized phase. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Although the plasma technology has long been applied to treat contact lenses, the effect of this treatment on the performance of drug-loaded contact lenses is still unclear. The objective of this work is to study the effect of nitrogen plasma treatment on two drug-loaded polymeric formulations which previously demonstrated to be suitable for therapeutic contact lenses: a poly-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (pHEMA) based hydrogel loaded with levofloxacin and a silicone-based hydrogel loaded with chlorhexidine. Modifications of the surface and the optical properties, and alterations in the drug release profiles and possible losses of the antimicrobial activities of the drugs induced by the plasma treatment were assessed. The results showed that, depending on the system and on the processing conditions, the plasma treatment may be beneficial for increasing wettability and refractive index, without degrading the lens surface. From the point of view of drug delivery, plasma irradiation at moderate power (200 W) decreased the initial release rate and the amount of released drug, maintaining the drug activity. For lower (100 W) and higher powers (300 W), almost no effect was detected because the treatment was, respectively, too soft and too aggressive for the lens materials. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was a comparison between new and worn siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses in terms of microscopic structure, surface morphology, and loading of hyaluronan. The analyses were performed by scanning electron microscopy, with the support of the freeze-drying technique, and by fluorescence confocal microscopy. Along the depth profile of new lenses, a thin porous top layer was observed, which corresponds to the region of hyaluronan penetration inside well-defined channels. The time evolution was followed from one day to two weeks of daily wear, when a completely different scenario was found. Clear experimental evidence of a buggy surface was observed with several crests and regions of swelling, which could be filled by the hyaluronan solution. The modifications are attributed to the progressive relaxation of the structure of the polymeric network. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluates a modified 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (M4M) as a candidate material for filling screw-retained implant access hole. Its characteristics were compared with a conventional composite resin (CR) with or without a bonding agent (BA) or a ceramic primer (CP). Ceramic blocks were divided into five groups, including (A) CR, (B) CR with BA, (C) CR with CP and BA, (D) M4M, and (E) M4M with CP. Shear bond strengths were measured after 5000 times of thermocycling. Groups A, B, and D were excluded from further tests as they showed no adhesion. A cylindrical cavity (2.5 mm diameter, 3 mm depth) simulating access hole was prepared in a ceramic block and glazed to evaluate micro-leakage and wear test of groups C and E. The results were statistically analyzed with Mann–Whitney test (p < 0.05). Shear bond strength of groups C (7.6 ± 2.2 MPa) and E (8.6 ± 1.0 MPa) was not significantly different. In micro-leakage analysis, average wear depth and wear volume, group E (7.5 ± 3.3%, 59.3 ± 12.9 μm, 0.16 ± 0.04 mm3) showed significantly lower values than those of group C (45.6 ± 24.4%, 76.0 ± 16.4 μm, 0.28 ± 0.03 mm3). It is suggested that the combination of CP and M4M can be one of feasible systems to fill the ceramic access holes of the implant upper structure. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of a copper loaded chitosan scaffold on bone regeneration in critical-sized calvarial defects in rats. Chitosan scaffolds and copper-chitosan scaffolds were fabricated and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chitosan and copper-chitosan scaffolds were implanted into 5 mm diameter critical-sized calvarial defects in Fisher 344 male rats. Empty defects (no scaffolds) were included as a control. After 4 weeks, the rats were sacrificed for microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis of new bone tissue development. Microscopy images revealed the uniformly porous structure of chitosan and copper-chitosan scaffolds. Significant bone regeneration was noted in the defects treated with copper-chitosan scaffolds when evaluated using micro-CT and histological analysis, when compared with other groups tested. On analysis of the micro-CT scans, an eleven-fold and a two-fold increase in the new bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) % was found in defects treated with the copper-chitosan scaffolds, when compared to empty defects and chitosan scaffolds, respectively. This study demonstrated the suitability of copper-crosslinked chitosan scaffolds for bone tissue engineering and provides the first evidence that inclusion of copper ions in scaffolds can enhance tissue regeneration. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we investigated the effect of different surface treatments (hydroxyapatite (HA) coating, alkali heat treatment, and no treatment) on the ability of bone to bond to a rough arc-sprayed Ti metal surface, using rabbit models. The bone-to-implant contacts for untreated, HA-coated, and alkali heat-treated implants were 21.2%, 72.1%, and 33.8% at 4 weeks, 21.8%, 70.9%, and 30.0% at 8 weeks, and 16.3%, 70.2%, and 29.9% at 16 weeks, respectively (n = 8). HA -coated implants showed significantly higher bone-to-implant contacts than the untreated and alkali heat-treated implants at all the time point, whereas alkali heat-treated implants showed significantly higher bone-to-implant contacts than untreated implants at 4 and 16 weeks. The failure loads in a mechanical test for untreated, HA coated, alkali heat-treated plates were 65.4 N, 70.7 N, and 90.8 N at 4 weeks, 76.1 N, 64.7 N, and 104.8 N at 8 weeks and 88.7 N, 92.6 N, and 118.5 N at 16 weeks, respectively (n = 8). The alkali heat-treated plates showed significantly higher failure loads than HA-coated plates at 8 and 16 weeks. The difference between HA-coated plates and untreated plates were not statistically significant at any time point. Thus HA coating, although it enables high bone-to-implant contact, may not enhance the bone-bonding properties of thermally-sprayed rough Ti metal surfaces. In contrast, alkali heat treatment can be successfully applied to thermally-sprayed Ti metal to enhance both bone-to-implant contact and bone-bonding strength. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to assess the ability of tissue engineered cartilage to adhere to and integrate with porous polyethylene (PPE) in vivo and to evaluate the biomechanical integrity of the bond formed at the interface. Porcine auricular, articular, and costal chondrocytes were suspended in fibrin gel polymer and placed between discs of PPE to form tri-layer constructs. Controls consisted of fibroblasts suspended in gel or gel alone between the discs. Constructs were implanted into nude mice for 6, 12, and 18 weeks. Upon harvest, specimens were evaluated for neocartilage formation and integration into the PPE, using histological, dimensional (mass, thickness, diameter), and biomechanical (adhesion strength, interfacial stiffness, failure energy and failure strain) analyses. Neotissue was formed in all experimental constructs, consisting mostly of neocartilage integrating with discs of PPE. Control samples contained only fibrous tissue. Biomechanical analyses demonstrated that adhesion strength, interfacial stiffness, and failure energy were all significantly higher in the chondrocyte-seeded samples than in fibroblast-seeded controls, with the exception of costal constructs at 12 weeks, which were not significantly greater than controls. In general, failure strains did not vary between groups. In conclusion, porous polyethylene supported the growth of neocartilage that formed mechanically functional bonds with the PPE. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 09/2014;