Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials (J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater )

Publisher: Society for Biomaterials; Nihon Baiomateriaru Gakkai; Australian Society for Biomaterials; Korean Society for Biomaterials, John Wiley and Sons

Description

Applied Biomaterials is published as Part B of the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, an official journal of the Society For Biomaterials, the Japanese Society for Biomaterials, the Australasian Society for Biomaterials, and the Korean Society for Biomaterials. It is a peer-reviewed journal serving the needs of biomaterials professionals who devise, promote, apply, regulate, produce, and market new biomaterials and medical devices. It is international and interdisciplinary in scope. Papers are published on device development, implant retrieval and analysis, manufacturing, regulation of devices, liability and legal issues, standards, reviews of different device areas, and clinical applications.

  • Impact factor
    2.31
  • 5-year impact
    2.52
  • Cited half-life
    4.80
  • Immediacy index
    0.26
  • Eigenfactor
    0.02
  • Article influence
    0.67
  • Website
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials website
  • Other titles
    Journal of biomedical materials research., Journal of biomedical materials research. Part B, Applied biomaterials, Applied biomaterials
  • ISSN
    1552-4981
  • OCLC
    51823311
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

John Wiley and Sons

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • On personal web site or secure external website at authors institution
    • Deposit in institutional repositories is not allowed
    • JASIST authors may deposit in an institutional repository
    • Non-commercial
    • Pre-print must be accompanied with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'John Wiley and Sons' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Electrical currents have deleterious effects on biomedical metallic implants. However, following arthroplasty, neuro-myoelectrostimulation (NMES) is often used in patient rehabilitation. Such a rehabilitation technique could compromise patient recovery through deleterious effects on metallic alloys and biological tissues. The purpose of our study was to assess the effects of NMES on a Ti6Al4V implant placed in a rat tibial crest and the surrounding muscle tissues. This in vivo study allowed to bring to the fore the prosthesis behavior under mechanical and electromagnetic loads induced by NEMS stimulation. After 3 weeks, implant-to-bone adhesion significantly decreased in stimulated animals compared with nonstimulated animals. Surface mapping indicated titanium implant degradation after NMES. Furthermore, NMES alone did not induce muscle damage contrary to that found in implanted animals. The muscle damage rate was significantly higher in implanted and stimulated animals compared with implanted-only animals. It seems obvious that rehabilitation programs using the NMES technique could induce early deterioration of biomaterial employed for surgical implants. Clinicians should reconsider the use of NMES as a rehabilitation technique for patients with titanium prostheses. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Tricalcium phosphate (TCP) is a bioceramic that is widely used in orthopedic and dental applications. TCP structures show excellent biocompatibility as well as biodegradability. In this study, porous β-TCP scaffolds were prepared by thermal decomposition of naphthalene. Scaffolds with 57.64% ± 3.54% density and a maximum pore size around 100 μm were fabricated via removing 30% naphthalene at 1150°C. The compressive strength for these scaffolds was 32.85 ± 1.41 MPa. Furthermore, by mixing 1 wt % SrO and 0.5 wt % SiO2, pore interconnectivity improved, but the compressive strength decreased to 22.40 ± 2.70 MPa. However, after addition of polycaprolactone coating layers, the compressive strength of doped scaffolds increased to 29.57 ± 3.77 MPa. Porous scaffolds were implanted in rabbit femur defects to evaluate their biological property. The addition of dopants triggered osteoinduction by enhancing osteoid formation, osteocalcin expression, and bone regeneration, especially at the interface of the scaffold and host bone. This study showed processing flexibility to make interconnected porous scaffolds with different pore size and volume fraction porosity, while maintaining high compressive mechanical strength and excellent bioactivity. Results show that SrO/SiO2-doped porous TCP scaffolds have excellent potential to be used in bone tissue engineering applications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 12/2014;
  • Roberto Elia, Courtney D. Michelson, Austin L. Perera, Teresa F. Brunner, Masly Harsono, Gray G. Leisk, Gerard Kugel, David L. Kaplan
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to characterize the mechanical properties and drug elution features of silk protein-based electrodeposited dental implant coatings. Silk processing conditions were modified to obtain coatings with a range of mechanical properties on titanium studs. These coatings were assessed for adhesive strength and dissolution, with properties tuned using water vapor annealing or glycerol incorporation to modulate crystalline content. Coating reproducibility was demonstrated over a range of silk concentrations from 1% to 10%. Surface roughness of titanium substrates was altered using industry relevant acid etching and grit blasting, and the effect of surface topography on silk coating adhesion was assessed. Florescent compounds were incorporated into the silk coatings, which were modulated for crystalline content, to achieve four days of sustained release of the compounds. This silk electrogelation technique offers a safe and relatively simple approach to generate mechanically robust, biocompatible, and degradable implant coatings that can also be functionalized with bioactive compounds to modulate the local regenerative tissue environment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The microstructure, mechanical behaviour, and biocompatibility (cell culture, morphology, and cell adhesion) of nanostructured Ti45Zr15Pd35-xSi5Nbx with x = 0, 5 (at. %) alloys, synthesized by arc melting and subsequent Cu mould suction casting, in the form of rods with 3 mm in diameter, are investigated. Both Ti-Zr-Pd-Si-(Nb) materials show a multi-phase (composite-like) microstructure. The main phase is cubic β-Ti phase (Im3m) but hexagonal α-Ti (P63/mmc), cubic TiPd (Pm3m), cubic PdZr (Fm3m), and hexagonal (Ti, Zr)5Si3 (P63/mmc) phases are also present. Nanoindentation experiments show that the Ti45Zr15Pd30Si5Nb5 sample exhibits lower Young's modulus than Ti45Zr15Pd35Si5. Conversely, Ti45Zr15Pd35Si5 is mechanically harder. Actually, both alloys exhibit larger values of hardness when compared with commercial Ti-40Nb, (HTi-Zr-Pd-Si ≈ 14 GPa, HTi-Zr-Pd-Si-Nb ≈ 10 GPa and HTi-40Nb ≈ 2.7 GPa). Concerning the biological behaviour, preliminary results of cell viability performed on several Ti-Zr-Pd-Si-(Nb) discs indicate that the number of live cells is superior to 94% in both cases. The studied Ti-Zr-Pd-Si-(Nb) bulk metallic system is thus interesting for biomedical applications because of the outstanding mechanical properties (relatively low Young's modulus combined with large hardness), together with the excellent biocompatibility. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 12/2014;
  • David B. Berlin, Michael J. Davidson, Frederick J. Schoen
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    ABSTRACT: We sought to evaluate the principles of disruptive innovation, defined as technology innovation that fundamentally shifts performance and utility metrics, as applied to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). In particular, we considered implantation procedure, device design, cost, and patient population. Generally cheaper and lower performing, classical disruptive innovations are first commercialized in insignificant markets, promise lower margins, and often parasitize existing usage, representing unattractive investments for established market participants. However, despite presently high unit cost, TAVI is less invasive, treats a “new,” generally high risk, patient population, and is generally done by a multidisciplinary integrated heart team. Moreover, at least in the short-term TAVI has not been lower-performing than open surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients. We conclude that TAVI extends the paradigm of disruptive innovation and represents an attractive commercial opportunity space. Moreover, should the long-term performance and durability of TAVI approach that of conventional prostheses, TAVI will be an increasingly attractive commercial opportunity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to develop and evaluate resin-based experimental dental sealants containing electrospun nylon-6 (N6) and chitosan (CH) fibers in an attempt to improve the physicomechanical properties and provide an antibacterial protective effect, respectively. Electrospun N6 and CH mats were immersed into a resin mixture, light-cured, and then cryomilled to obtain micron-sized resin-modified fiber particles. Different levels of the novel cryomilled particles (i.e. 1, 2.5, and 5% relative to the resin mixture, % by weight) were used to prepare the N6- and CH-containing sealants. A commercial sealant and the experimental resin mixture (unfilled) were used as controls. Flexural strength (FS), Vickers microhardness (VH), and agar diffusion tests were performed. The data were analyzed at the 5% significance level. No significant difference in fiber diameter of N6 (503 ± 31 nm) and CH (595 ± 38 nm) was observed. Upon cryomilling, the resin-modified CH and N6 mats led to the formation of irregularly-shaped particles, with an average diameter of 14.24 µm and 15.87 µm, respectively. CH-5% had significantly higher FS (115.3 ± 1.3 MPa) than all the other groups. CH-1% had significantly higher hardness values (38.3 ± 0.3 VHN) than all the other groups. Collectively, the results indicated that CH-containing sealants presented the highest FS and hardness; however, none of the CH-containing sealants displayed antimicrobial properties. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, cell chip-based platforms have begun to show promise as a means of corroborating the findings of in vivo animal tests for cytotoxicity, and perhaps in the future partially replacing the need for such animal models. In contrast to the conventional culture methods, micro- and nanofabrication techniques can be utilized to provide a set of mechanostimulatory signals to the cells that mimic the context of extracellular matrix (ECM) of the tissue in which a particular cell line resides. Here, we report periodic lateral topographic striations, with a pitch ranging approximately from 200 to 800 nm with an intention to mimic a common geometry of fibrils in the ECM such as collagen or elastin, as a platform for investigating anticancer drug-induced cytotoxicity in stem cells. The ECM cues could facilitate perimeter, elongation, and gap junction formation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which eventually influenced the fate of cells in terms of death and survival against the common chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. Interestingly, the appropriate inhibition of gap junctions of MSCs on the ECM mimicking substrates could prevent the cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity through the inhibition of the cisplatin-induced 'death signal communication' as compared to that on the flat substrates. Our results imply that nanoscale topography is an important consideration for chip-based cytotoxicity assays, which uniquely enable the consideration and rational design of ECM-like topographic features, and furthermore, that the natural topography of the ECM in the context of stem cell niches may serve as an important indicator for chemotherapeutic agent sensitivity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to develop and characterize an injectable bone void filler by incorporating baghdadite (Ca3ZrSi2O9) particles (average size of 1.7 µm) into polycaprolactone (PCL). A series of PCL composites containing different volume percentages of baghdadite [1 (PCL-1%Bag), 5 (PCL-5%Bag), 10 (PCL-10%Bag), 20 (PCL-20%Bag), and 30 (PCL-30%Bag)] were prepared, and their injectability, setting time, mechanical properties, radiopacity, degradation, and cytocompatibility were investigated. PCL, PCL-1%Bag, PCL-5%Bag, and PCL-10%Bag were able to be injected through a stainless steel syringe (Length: 9.0 mm, nozzle diameter: 2.2 mm) at 75°C at injection forces of below 1.5 kN. The core temperature of the injected material at the nozzle exit ranged between 55 and 60°C and was shown to set after 2.5–3.5 min postinjection in a 37°C environment. Injection force, melt viscosity, and radiopacity of the composites increased with increasing baghdadite content. Incorporation of 10–30 vol % baghdadite into PCL increased the compressive strength of the composites from 36 to 47.1 MPa, compared with that for pure PCL (31.4 MPa). Similar trend was found for the compressive modulus of the composites, which increased from 203.8 to 741 MPa, compared with that for pure PCL (205 MPa). Flexural strain of PCL, PCL-5%Bag, and PCL-10%Bag exceeded 30%, and PCL-10%Bag showed the highest flexural strength (29.8 MPa). Primary human osteoblasts cultured on PCL-10%Bag showed a significant upregulation of osteogenic genes compared with pure PCL. In summary, our results demonstrated that PCL-10%Bag could be a promising injectable material for orthopedic and trauma application. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The individual healing profile of a given bone substitute with respect to osteogenic potential and substitution rate must be considered when selecting adjunctive grafting materials for bone regeneration procedures. In this study, standardized mandibular defects in minipigs were filled with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA-SiO), deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM), biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) with a 60/40% HA/β-TCP (BCP 60/40) ratio, or particulate autogenous bone (A) for histological and histomorphometric analysis. At 2 weeks, percent filler amongst the test groups (DBBM (35.65%), HA-SiO (34.47%), followed by BCP 60/40 (23.64%)) was significantly higher than the more rapidly substituted autogenous bone (17.1%). Autogenous bone yielded significantly more new bone (21.81%) over all test groups (4.91%–7.74%) and significantly more osteoid (5.53%) than BCP 60/40 (3%) and DBBM (2.25%). At 8 weeks, percent filler amongst the test groups (DBBM (31.6%), HA-SiO (31.23%), followed by BCP 60/40 (23.65%)) demonstrated a similar pattern and was again significantly higher as compared to autogenous bone (9.29%). Autogenous bone again exhibited statistically significantly greater new bone (55.13%) over HA-SiO (40.62%), BCP 60/40 (40.21%), and DBBM (36.35%). These results suggest that the osteogenic potential of HA-SiO and BCP is inferior when compared to autogenous bone. However, in instances where a low substitution rate is desired to maintain the volume stability of augmented sites, particularly in the esthetic zone, HA-SiO and DBBM may be favored. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A newly developed copper-bearing stainless steel (Cu-SS) by directly immobilizing proper amount of Cu into a medical stainless steel (317L SS) during the metallurgical process could enable continuous release of trace amount of Cu2+ ions, which play the key role to offer the multi-biofunctions of the stainless steel, including the osteogenic ability in the present study. The results of in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that Cu2+ ions from Cu-SS could promote the osteogenic differentiation by stimulating the Alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity and the osteogenic gene expressions (Col1a1, Opn, and Runx2), and enhancing the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts cultured on its surface. The in vivo test further proved that more new bone tissue formed around the Cu-SS implant with more stable bone-to-implant contact in comparison with the 317L SS. In addition, Cu-SS showed satisfied biocompatibility according to the results of in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo histocompatibility, and its daily released amount of Cu2+ ions in physiological saline solution was at trace level of ppb order (1.4 ppb/cm2), which is rather safe to human health. Apart from these results, it was also found that Cu-SS could inhibit the happening of inflammation with lower TNF-α expression in the bone tissue post implantation compared with 317L SS. In addition to good biocompatibility, the overall findings demonstrated that the Cu-SS possessed obvious ability of promoting osteogenesis, indicating a unique application advantage in orthopedics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a popular alternative technique to surgical valve replacement. However, the biological valve tissue used in these devices appears to be fragile material in the long term particularly due being folded for low diameter catheter insertion purposes and when released in a calcified environment with irregular geometry. Textile polyester material is characterized by outstanding folding and strength properties combined with proven biocompatibility. It could therefore be considered as a replacement for biological valve leaflets in the TAVI procedure. The folding process associated with crimping, however, may degrade the filaments involved in the fibrous assembly and limit the durability of the device. The purpose of the present work is to study the effect of different crimping conditions on the mechanical performances of textile valve prototypes made from various fabric constructions. Results show that crimping generates some creases in the fabrics, which surface topography varies with fabric construction and crimping configuration. The mechanical properties of the crimped materials are globally slightly reduced. To determine how critical the modifications due to crimping are for prosthesis durability, more detailed long term in vitro and in vivo trials with crimped textile prototypes are needed in addition to this preliminary work. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Three-dimensional printing (3DP) uses inkjet printheads to selectively deposit liquid binder to adjoin powder particles in a layer-by-layer fashion to create a computer-modeled 3D object. Two general approaches for 3DP have been described for biomedical applications (direct and indirect 3DP). The two approaches offer competing advantages, and both are limited by print resolution. This study describes a materials processing strategy to enhance 3DP resolution by controlled shrinking net-shape scaffolds. Briefly, porogen preforms are printed and infused with the desired monomer or polymer solution. After solidification or polymerization, the porogen is leached and the polymer is allowed to shrink by controlled drying. Heat treatment is performed to retain the dimensions against swelling forces. The main objective of this study is to determine the effects of polymer content and post-processing on dimension, microstructure, and thermomechanical properties of the scaffold. For polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-DA), reducing polymer content corresponded with greater shrinkage with maximum shrinkage of ∼80 vol% at 20% vol% PEG-DA. The secondary heat treatment retains the microarchitecture and new dimensions of the scaffolds, even when the heat-treated scaffolds are immersed into water. To demonstrate shrinkage predictability, 3D components with interlocking positive and negative features were printed, processed, and fitted. This material processing strategy provides an alternative method to enhance the resolution of 3D scaffolds, for a wide range of polymers, without optimizing the binder-powder interaction physics to print each material combination. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Non-viral gene delivery systems are important transport vehicles that can be safe and effective alternatives to currently available viral systems. A new family of multifunctional spider silk-based gene carriers was bioengineered and found capable of targeting human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). These carriers successfully delivered DNA to the nucleus of these mammalian cells. The presence of specific functional sequences in the recombinant proteins, such as a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) of the large tumor (T) antigen of the Simian virus 40 (SV40), an hMSC high affinity binding peptide (HAB), and a translocation motif (TLM) of the hepatitis-B virus surface protein (PreS2), and their roles in mitigation and enhancement of gene transfection efficiency towards hMSCs were characterized. The results demonstrate that these bioengineered spider silk proteins serve as effective carriers, without the well-known complications associated with viral delivery systems. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we have developed ι-carrageenan/chitosan/gelatin (CCG) scaffold containing multiple functional groups (-NH2, -OH, -COOH, and –SO3H) to resemble the native extracellular matrix (ECM), using the ion-shielding technology and ultrasonic dispersion method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the CCG scaffolds suggests that the formation of CCG network involves electrostatic interactions between ι-carrageenan (ι-CA) and chitosan/gelatin, and the covalent cross-linking among amino groups of chitosan and/or gelatin. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation reveals that the porous structure of scaffolds can be modulated by the ratio of ι-CA to chitosan/gelatin. The swelling ratio of the hydrogels increases as the ι-CA contents increase. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we found that the double helix structure of ι-CA is only stabilized at low contents of ι-CA in the CCG scaffolds (e.g., 5 wt %). The scaffolds containing 5% ι-CA showed the best protein adsorption capacity (4.46 ± 0.63 μg protein/mg scaffold) and elastic modulus (5.37 ± 1.03 MPa). In addition, the CCG scaffolds exhibit excellent support for adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) attachment and proliferation, and they can improve the osteogenic differentiation and neovascularization capacities of ADMSCs. Overall, we conclude that the CCG may represent an ideal scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The thrombogenicity of a biomaterial is mainly dependent on its surface characteristics, which dictates its interactions with blood. Surface properties such as composition, roughness wettability, surface free energy, and morphology will affect an implant material's hemocompatibility. Additionally, in the realm of metallic biomaterials, the specific composition of the alloy and its surface treatment are important factors that will affect the surface properties. The utility of magneto-electropolished (MEP) ternary Nitinol alloys, NiTiTa, and NiTiCr as blood contacting materials was investigated. The hemcompatibility of these alloys were compared to mechanically polished (MP) metallic biomaterial counterparts. In vitro thrombogenicity tests revealed significantly less platelet adherence on ternary MEP Nitinol, especially MEP NiTi10Ta as compared to the MP metals (p < 0.05). The enhanced anti-platelet-adhesive property of MEP NiTi10Ta was in part, attributed to the Ta2O5 component of the alloy. Furthermore, the formation of a dense and mixed hydrophobic oxide layer during MEP is believed to have inhibited the adhesion of negatively charged platelets. In conclusion, MEP ternary Nitinol alloys can potentially be utilized for blood-contacting devices where, complications resulting from thrombogenicity can be minimized. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Repair of cartilage–bone interface tissue remains challenging, because it combines different cell types and gradients of composition and properties. To enable simultaneous regeneration of bone, cartilage, and especially their interface, a conically graded scaffold of chitosan–gelatin hydrogel/poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was facilely prepared in the study. The chitosan–gelatin hydrogel containing transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) was used for chondrogenesis, while the PLGA scaffold loading bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) for osteogenesis. The conically graded transition from the hydrogel to PLGA scaffold and graded variation in amount of growth factors from TGF-β1 to BMP-2 benefited the cartilage–bone interface reconstruction. The graded scaffold exhibited spatio-temporal delivery of TGF-β1 and BMP-2. Preliminary results of in vitro cell culture demonstrated that the hydrogel and PLGA phases could promote bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells toward chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation, respectively. From the result of the pilot in vivo experiment, it showed that the regenerated hyaline-like cartilage surface and subchondral bone excellently integrated with the native tissues were found by using the TGF-β1 and BMP-2 double-loaded hydrogel/PLGA graded scaffold via H&E and immunohistochemical stainings of collagen I, collagen II, and osteocalcin at 2 months. The obtained preliminary experiment results showed that the hydrogel/PLGA graded scaffold combining multiphasic composition and spatial dual growth-factor delivery would be useful for cartilage–bone interface tissue defect repair. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, we have fabricated electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone)-based membranes, characterized and studied the in vivo cell migration and proliferation and wound healing activity. Moreover, we did not seed any cells prior to the animal implantation and we could observe excellent fibroblast attachment and cell proliferation. Further full thickness excision wound on guinea pig completely healed within 35 days. We could reach in an assumption that the enhanced cell proliferation and wound healing might be due to the surface degradation of the polymer under physiological conditions and the formation of functional groups like hydroxyl and carboxyl groups that promoted cell proliferation in a cell adhesion protein mediated mechanism. This study is a novel tissue engineering concept for the reconstruction of a damaged tissue without the in vitro cell seeding and proliferation prior to the in vivo implantation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2014.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 11/2014;