National vital statistics reports: from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.); National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.); National Vital Statistics System (U.S.)

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Website National vital statistics reports : from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System website
Other titles Births, marriages, divorces, and deaths., National vital statistics reports, NVSR reports
ISSN 1551-8922
OCLC 39762868
Material type Government publication, National government publication, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Beginning with the 2014 data year, the National Center for Health Statistics is transitioning to a new standard for estimating the gestational age of a newborn. The new measure, the obstetric estimate of gestation at delivery (OE), replaces the measure based on the date of the last normal menses (LMP). This transition is being made because of increasing evidence of the greater validity of the OE compared with the LMP-based measure. This report describes the relationship between the two measures. Agreement between the two measures is shown for 2013. Comparisons between the two measures for single gestational weeks and selected gestational age categories for 2013, and trends in the two measures for 2007-2013 by gestational category, focusing on preterm births, are shown for the United States and by race and Hispanic origin and state. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.
    National vital statistics reports: from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System 05/2015; 64(5):1-20.
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    ABSTRACT: To describe data on interpregnancy intervals (IPI), defined as the timing between a live birth and conception of a subsequent live birth, from a subset of jurisdictions that adopted the 2003 revised birth certificate. Because this information is available among revised jurisdictions only, the national representativeness of IPI and related patterns to the entire United States were assessed using the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.
    National vital statistics reports: from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System 04/2015; 64(4):1-11.
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives-This report describes state-specific trends in primary cesarean delivery rates from 2006 through 2012 for reporting areas that implemented the 2003 U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth by January 1, 2006, and from 2009 through 2012 for reporting areas that implemented the 2003 revision by January 1, 2009. State-specific changes by gestational age are also explored. Methods-Data for 2006-2012 are based on 100% of singleton births to residents of the reporting areas that implemented the 2003 birth certificate revision by January 1 of each year. Results are not generalizable to the entire United States-the reporting areas do not represent a random sample of U.S. births. Results-The primary cesarean delivery rate for the 2006 reporting area (19 states) increased from 21.9% in 2006 to 22.4% in 2009, and then declined to 21.9% in 2012. For the 2009 reporting area (28 states and New York City), the primary cesarean rate declined from 22.1% to 21.5% during 2009-2012. Rates for 16 of 29 areas declined during 2009-2012; the remaining states were unchanged. By gestational age, state-specific primary cesarean delivery rates at 38 weeks declined for 18 of 29 areas from 2009 to 2012; few state-specific changes were observed at other gestational ages. The primary cesarean delivery rate for the 38 states, District of Columbia, and New York City that were using the revised certificate by January 1, 2012, was 21.5%. State-specific rates ranged from 12.5% (Utah) to 26.9% (Florida and Louisiana).
    National vital statistics reports: from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System 01/2014; 63(1):1-11.
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    ABSTRACT: Objective—This report presents national estimates of the use of family planning services and related medical services among women aged 15–44 in the United States in 2006–2010. Selected indicators are compared with similar measures for 2002 and 1995 to examine changes overtime. Methods—Data for this report come primarily from the 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG),which included12,279 interviews with women aged 15–44. The response rate for women in the 2006–2010 NSFG was 78%. Results—In 2006–2010, 43million women aged15–44 received a family planning or related medical service in the previous 12 months. A Pap test and a pelvic exam were the most common services received by women in the previous year, followed by receipt of a method of birth control. About 18% of women received a family planning or related medical service from a clinic in the past 12months and one-half of these women received it from a TitleX-funded clinic. In contrast, 53% of women received a family planning or related medical service in the past 12 months from a private doctor. Use of TitleX-funded clinics was more common among women in cohabiting unions, black and Hispanic women, those who lived in nonmetropolitan areas, those below the poverty level, and those without health insurance.
    National vital statistics reports: from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System 09/2013; 68.
  • National vital statistics reports: from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System 04/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: This report presents final 2008 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death. Information reported on death certificates, which is completed by funeral directors, attending physicians, medical examiners, and coroners, is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. In 2008, a total of 2,471,984 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 758.3 deaths per 100,000 standard population, a decrease of 0.2 percent from the 2007 rate and a record low figure. Life expectancy at birth rose 0.2 years, from 77.9 years in 2007 to a record high 78.1 years in 2008. The age-specific death rate increased for age group 85 years and over. Age-specific death rates decreased for age groups: less than 1 year, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, and 65-74 years. The age-specific death rates remained unchanged for age groups: 1-4, 45-54, 55-64, and 75-84 years. The 15 leading causes of death in 2008 remained the same as in 2007, but Chronic lower respiratory diseases and suicide increased in the ranking while stroke and septicemia decreased in the ranking. Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in 2008 after more than five decades at number three in the ranking. Chronic lower respiratory diseases is the third leading cause of death for 2008. The infant mortality rate decreased 2.1 percent to a historically low value of 6.61 deaths per 1000 live births in 2008. The decline of the age-adjusted death rate to a record low value for the United States and the increase in life expectancy to a record high value of 78.1 years are consistent with long-term trends in mortality.
    National vital statistics reports: from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System 12/2011; 59(10):1-126.
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    ABSTRACT: This report presents complete period life tables by race, Hispanic origin, and sex for the United States based on age-specific death rates in 2007. Data used to prepare the 2007 life tables are 2007 final mortality statistics, July 1, 2007, population estimates based on the 2000 decennial census, and 2007 Medicare data for ages 66-100. The methods used to estimate the life tables for the total, white, and black populations were first used in annual life tables in 2005 and have been in use since that time (1). The methods used to estimate the life tables for the Hispanic, non-Hispanic white, and non-Hispanic black populations were first used to estimate U.S. life tables by Hispanic origin for data year 2006 (2). In 2007, the overall expectation of life at birth was 77.9 years, representing an increase of 0.2 years from life expectancy in 2006. From 2006 to 2007, life expectancy at birth increased for all groups considered. It increased for males (from 75.1 to 75.4) and females (from 80.2 to 80.4), the white (from 78.2 to 78.4) and black (from 73.2 to 73.6) populations, the Hispanic population (from 80.6 to 80.9), the non-Hispanic white population (from 78.1 to 78.2), and the non-Hispanic black population (from 72.9 to 73.2).
    National vital statistics reports: from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System 09/2011; 59(9):1-60.
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    ABSTRACT: This report presents data for selected items exclusive to the 2003 U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth as well as key items considered not comparable between the 1989 (unrevised) and 2003 (revised) versions for states and territories that implemented the 2003 revision as of January 1, 2008. Information is shown for educational attainment, tobacco use during pregnancy, month prenatal care began, and checkboxes in the following categories: "risk factors in this pregnancy," "obstetric procedures," "characteristics of labor and delivery," "method of delivery," "abnormal conditions of the newborn," and "congenital anomalies of the newborn." Descriptive statistics are presented on births occurring in 2008 to residents of the 27 states that implemented the revised birth certificate. There were 2,748,302 births to residents of the 27-state reporting area, representing 65 percent of 2008 U.S. births. About 78 percent of women had at least a high school diploma; 24.5 percent had an advanced education. One out of 10 women smoked during pregnancy (24-state reporting area) and one out of five smokers quit while pregnant. Almost three-quarters of women began prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy. The rate of prepregnancy diabetes was 6.5 per 1,000 and gestational diabetes was 40.6; risk of both types rose with maternal age. Nearly one out of four women had a primary cesarean delivery; less than 1 out of 10 women had a vaginal birth after cesarean delivery. About 27 percent of women attempted a trial of labor before a cesarean delivery. Seven percent of all infants were admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit.
    National vital statistics reports: from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System 07/2011; 59(7):1-28.
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives—This report presents 2007 period infant mortality statistics from the linked birth/infant death data set (linked file) by a variety of maternal and infant characteristics. The linked file differs from the mortality file, which is based entirely on death certificate data. Methods—Descriptive tabulations of data are presented and interpreted. Results—The U.S. infant mortality rate was 6.75 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2007, not significantly different than the rate of 6.68 in 2006. Infant mortality rates ranged from 4.57 per 1,000 live births for mothers of Central and South American origin to 13.31 for non Hispanic black mothers. Infant mortality rates were higher for those infants who were born in multiple deliveries; for those whose mothers were born in the 50 states or the District of Columbia; and for mothers
    National vital statistics reports: from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System 06/2011; 59(6):1-30.
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    ABSTRACT: This report presents 2008 data on receipt of epidural and spinal anesthesia as collected on the 2003 U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth. The purpose of this report is to describe the characteristics of women giving birth and the circumstances of births in which epidural or spinal anesthesia is used to relieve the pain of labor for vaginal deliveries. Descriptive statistics are presented on births occurring in 2008 to residents of 27 states that had implemented the 2003 U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth as of January 1, 2008. Analyses are limited to singleton births in vaginal deliveries that occurred in the 27-state reporting area only and are not generalizable to the United States as a whole. Overall, 61 percent of women who had a singleton birth in a vaginal delivery in the 27 states in 2008 received epidural or spinal anesthesia; non-Hispanic white women received epidural or spinal anesthesia more often (69 percent) than other racial groups. Among Hispanic origin groups, Puerto Rican women were most likely to receive epidural or spinal anesthesia (68 percent). Levels of treatment with epidural or spinal anesthesia decreased by advancing age of mother. Levels increased with increasing maternal educational attainment. Early initiation of prenatal care increased the likelihood of epidural or spinal anesthesia receipt, as did attendance at birth by a physician. Use of epidural or spinal anesthesia was more common in vaginal deliveries assisted by forceps (84 percent) or vacuum extraction (77 percent) than in spontaneous vaginal deliveries (60 percent). Use of epidural or spinal anesthesia was less likely when infants were born prior to 34 weeks of gestation or weighed less than 1,500 grams. Women with chronic and gestational diabetes were more likely to receive an epidural or spinal anesthesia than women with no pregnancy risk factors. Precipitous labor (less than 3 hours) was associated with decreased epidural or spinal anesthesia receipt. longer second stage of labor, and fetal distress (compared with women who receive opiates intravenously or by injection) (1,5,6). Severe headache, maternal hypotension, maternal fever, and urinary retention have also been associated with epidural/spinal anesthesia receipt (5). This report examines the relationship between epidural/spinal anesthesia receipt and selected characteristics of the mother and of labor among vaginal deliveries in the 27-state reporting area as reported on the 2003 U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth.
    National vital statistics reports: from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System 04/2011; 59(5):1-13, 16.