Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Publisher: American Academy of Sleep Medicine, American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Description

Impact factor 2.93

  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    4.10
  • Immediacy index
    0.47
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Other titles
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine, JCSM
  • ISSN
    1550-9397
  • OCLC
    55687194
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Journal is deposited in PubMed Central for public release after 6 months
    • Written permission must be given for deposit by other means.
  • Classification
    ​ white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This post hoc analysis evaluated the time to response that can be expected with sodium oxybate (SXB) for treatment of EDS and cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy. Data were from a 4-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (GHB-2; N = 136) of oral SXB 3 g, 6 g, and 9 g nightly, and its 12-month open-label extension (GHB-3). Two response definitions were utilized: ≥20% improvement in ESS score (EDS responders), and ≥50% reduction in weekly cataplexy attacks (cataplexy responders). These thresholds were previously determined to be clinically relevant based on analysis of the relationship of Clinical Global Impression of Change with ESS and number of cataplexy attacks. Kaplan-Meier curves and median times to first response, based on above criteria, and to maximum response were estimated. Among 86 patients randomized to SXB in GHB-2 and continued into GHB-3, 77.6% and 90.7% were EDS and cataplexy responders, respectively. The median (95% CI) times to first response were 37 (31-50) days for EDS and 25 (17-29) days for cataplexy, and median times to maximum response were 106 (85-164) days for EDS and 213 (94-279) days for cataplexy. GHB-3 results among 31 patients initially randomized to placebo were consistent with those treated with SXB throughout, but with longer times to maximum response. Response onset, assessed as clinically meaningful improvements in EDS and cataplexy, was observed in most patients within 2 months; a longer period is needed to achieve maximum response. Clinicians should recognize that time to initial and maximum response may take weeks to months. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Several strategies have been found to be effective for the treatment of childhood behavioral sleep disorders. One which has yet to be evaluated is the Zurich 3-step concept, which combines basic concepts of the two-process model of sleep regulation (introducing a regular rhythm and adjusting bedtime to sleep need) with behavioral strategies. This uncontrolled before-and-after study describes our concept and its step-wise approach, assesses changes in sleep-wake variables and behavior problems, and examines associations between changes in sleep-wake variables and behavior problems. A total of 79 children with sleep problems (age range 6-47 months, 42% females) were included. Sleep problems were assessed by the Infant Sleep Questionnaire, sleep-wake variables by diary and actigraphy, and behavior problems of children ≥18 months by the Child Behavior Checklist. A significant decrease in nocturnal wake duration (Cohen's d = -0.34) and a significant increase in the duration of the longest continuous nocturnal sleep period (Cohen's d = 0.19) were found from before to after intervention (on average 2.7 months, SD 1.5). The variability for sleep onset and end time decreased, and actigraphically measured circadian rest-activity cycle measures improved. Parent-reported internalizing and total behavior problems also decreased (Cohen's d = 0.66). The findings of both objective and subjective assessment techniques suggest that the Zurich 3-step concept is effective. Thus, the Zurich 3-step intervention concept may be useful in clinical practice with sleep-disordered children. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We hypothesized that a dual-channel portable monitor (PM) device could accurately identify patients who have a high pretest probability of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and we evaluated factors that may contribute to variability between PM and polysomnography (PSG) results. Consecutive clinic patients (N = 104) with possible OSA completed a home PM study, a PM study simultaneous with laboratory PSG, and a second home PM study. Uniform data analysis methods were applied to both PM and PSG data. Primary outcomes of interest were the positive likelihood ratio (LR+) and sensitivity of the PM device to "rule-in" OSA, defined as an apnea hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 events/h on PSG. Effects of different test environment and study nights, and order of study and analysis methods (manual compared to automated) on PM diagnostic accuracy were assessed. The PM has adequate LR+ (4.8), sensitivity (80%), and specificity (83%) for detecting OSA in the unattended home setting when benchmarked against laboratory PSG, with better LR+ (>5) and specificity (100%) and unchanged sensitivity (80%) in the simultaneous laboratory comparison. There were no significant night-night (all p > 0.10) or study order effects (home or laboratory first, p = 0.08) on AHI measures. Manual PM data review improved case finding accuracy, although this was not statistically significant (all p > 0.07). Misclassification was more frequent where OSA was mild. Overall performance of the PM device is consistent with current recommended criteria for an "acceptable" device to confidently "rule-in" OSA (AHI ≥5 events/h) in a high pretest probability clinic population. Our data support the utility of simple two-channel diagnostic devices to confirm the diagnosis of OSA in the home environment. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related respiratory disorder. It is associated with many endocrinopathies including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolism, and glucose intolerance that may lead to bone loss with secondary osteoporosis. We report the case of a 41 year old man who presented with bilateral 9th rib fractures and was found to have obstructive sleep apnea and osteoporosis. We also present a literature review on this topic. OSA can lead to bone loss through various mechanisms. Some are shared with obesity, including hypogonadism, altered adrenergic tone, inflammation, oxidative stress, vitamin D deficiency and diabetes mellitus; others are specific to OSA, such as hypoxia and altered glucocorticoids regulation. There are no guidelines on screening for osteoporosis in OSA. Further research is needed to assess the incidence of bone loss and fractures in OSA. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Report of Case This is a case of a 15-year-old nonverbal, developmentally delayed boy with history of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), autistic spectrum disorder, Pierre Robin sequence (PRS), subglottic stenosis, and ongoing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), who required aggressive surgical intervention. OSA related symptoms included loud snoring, apneas, awakenings with gasping breaths, enuresis, and daytime sleepiness. The patient also had a history of behavioral problems including aggressive behavior, which led to his family and his health care providers experiencing challenges caring for him. For example, the patient's behavior made examining him very difficult and prevented ENT exam. Likewise, OSA was difficult to manage due to the patient's inability to cooperate with treatment. The OSA treatment course for this patient is briefly described below. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 01/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To determine the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), health-related factors and the likelihood of heavy vehicle crashes in Western Australia (WA). This case-control study included 100 long-haul heavy vehicle drivers who were involved in a police-reported crash in WA during the study period (cases) and 100 long-haul heavy vehicle drivers recruited from WA truck stops, who were not involved in a crash during the past year (controls). Driver demographics, health, and fatigue-related characteristics were obtained using an interviewer administered questionnaire. Drivers were tested for OSA using a diagnostic Flow Wizard. Logistic regression was used to determine health-related factors associated with crash involvement among long distance heavy vehicle drivers. Heavy vehicle drivers diagnosed with OSA through the use of the FlowWizard were over three times more likely to be involved in a crash than drivers without OSA (adjusted OR:3.42, 95%CI: 1.34-8.72). The risk of crash was significantly increased if heavy vehicle drivers reported a diagnosis of depression (adjusted OR: 6.59, 95%CI: 1.30-33.24) or had not completed fatigue management training (adjusted OR: 6.05, 95%CI: 1.80-20.24). Crash risk was 74% lower among older drivers (>35 years) than younger drivers (adjusted OR: 0.25, 95%CI: 0.08-0.82). The results suggest that more rigorous screening and subsequent treatment of OSA and depression by clinicians as well as compulsory fatigue management training may reduce crashes among heavy vehicle drivers. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 01/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Heart attacks and motor vehicle crashes (MVC) are the leading causes of death in US firefighters. Given that sleep disorders are an independent risk factor for both of these, we examined the prevalence of common sleep disorders in a national sample of firefighters and their association with adverse health and safety outcomes. Firefighters (n = 6,933) from 66 US fire departments were assessed for common sleep disorders using validated screening tools, as available. Firefighters were also surveyed about health and safety, and documentation was collected for reported MVCs. A total of 37.2% of firefighters screened positive for any sleep disorder including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 28.4%; insomnia, 6.0%; shift work disorder, 9.1%; and restless legs syndrome, 3.4%. Compared with those who did not screen positive, firefighters who screened positive for a sleep disorder were more likely to report an MVC (adjusted odds ratio 2.00, 95% CI 1.29-3.12, p = 0.0021) and were more likely to self-report falling asleep while driving (2.41, 2.06-2.82, p < 0.0001). Firefighters who screened positive for a sleep disorder were more likely to report having cardiovascular disease (2.37, 1.54-3.66, p < 0.0001), diabetes (1.91, 1.31-2.81, p = 0.0009), depression (3.10, 2.49-3.85, p < 0.0001), and anxiety (3.81, 2.87-5.05, p < 0.0001), and to report poorer health status (p < 0.0001) than those who did not screen positive. Adverse health and safety associations persisted when OSA and non-OSA sleep disorders were examined separately. Sleep disorders are prevalent in firefighters and are associated with increased risk of adverse health and safety outcomes. Future research is needed to assess the efficacy of occupational sleep disorders prevention, screening, and treatment programs in fire departments to reduce these safety and health risks. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 01/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Poor sleep quality, particularly insomnia, has been identified as a frequent problem among individuals with mental health difficulties. Comorbid sleep difficulties adversely affect quality of life and functioning, and have been associated with the causation and maintenance of a number of psychiatric disorders, as well as increasing the risk of relapse. The study objectives were to ascertain clinician knowledge related to insomnia, investigate sleep quality among service users in a community mental health setting in the UK, and evaluate service provision of evidence-based interventions for sleep difficulties.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 10/2014;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sleep disorders are frequent in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Among them, restless legs syndrome (RLS) may affect up to 60% of patients on dialysis, and it has been related to a poor quality of life and higher cardiovascular risk. Despite its high prevalence in advanced stages of renal disease, RLS frequency in non-dialysis CKD has not been clearly established. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of RLS in non-dialysis CKD patients (stages 2 to 4) followed in a reference nephrology outpatient clinic.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Drugs can influence results of multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT). We sought to identify the effect of marijuana on MSLT results in pediatric patients evaluated for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS).
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Over the last decade therapeutic, pathogenetic, epidemiological and genetic research in restless legs syndrome/ Willis-Ekbom Disease (RLS/WED) has required the development of specific quality of life scales and sleep scales. A Movement Disorder Society Task Force formally evaluated the quality of these scales.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Compare auto-adjusting positive airway pressure (APAP) treatment with positive airway pressure (PAP) titration by polysomnography (PSG) followed by CPAP treatment in patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by home sleep apnea testing (HSAT).
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report a 16-year-old pubescent pediatric patient with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and short stature whose apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was significantly reduced following the use of an orthodontic oral appliance that advances the mandible ventrally. The mandible was advanced 64% of the maximal mandibular protrusive position with use of the appliance over a 3-year period. The patient's AHI without the appliance in place decreased from 101.6/h at baseline to 11/h after treatment. Moreover, the patient's height increased 14 cm during treatment, resulting in height close to the average height for his age. Cephalometric analysis revealed an improvement in his retrognathic mandible and proclination of the upper front teeth. In conclusion, an orthodontic mandibular advancement oral appliance played an important role not only in improving the patient's OSAS but also in normalizing his physical growth during puberty.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 10/2014;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 10/2014;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 10/2014;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 10/2014;