Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: American Academy of Sleep Medicine, American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Journal description

Current impact factor: 2.83

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.826
2012 Impact Factor 2.928
2011 Impact Factor 3.232

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 4.10
Immediacy index 0.47
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.00
Other titles Journal of clinical sleep medicine, JCSM
ISSN 1550-9397
OCLC 55687194
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Journal is deposited in PubMed Central for public release after 6 months
    • Written permission must be given for deposit by other means.
  • Classification
    ​ white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Taking hypnotic agents 30 min before bedtime is the usual suggested administration time, but some patients report dissatisfaction with their sleeping pills. We investigated whether the timing of sleeping pill administration influences patient subjective satisfaction with these drugs. One hundred twelve patients with primary insomnia currently taking benzodiazepine or nonbenzodiazepine gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists as sleeping pills were selected. The time of administration for their sleeping pills, bedtime, sleep onset time, and wake-up time were obtained from their medical records. Subjects were also categorized into satisfied or dissatisfied groups. Hypnotic agents administration time (p < 0.001) and bedtime (p < 0.001), but not sleep onset or wake-up time, occurred later in the night in the satisfied group. The durations from administration of pills to sleep onset (33.6 ± 20.7 min) and to wake-up time (7.2 ± 1.2 h) were significantly shorter in the satisfied group when compared to the dissatisfied group (135.9 ± 73.4 min and 9.3 ± 1.5 h for time to sleep onset and wake up, respectively). Logistic regression analysis revealed that patient subjective satisfaction with hypnotic agents could be predicted by a short duration from administration of pills to sleep onset (odds ratio = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [0.001-0.09]) and a short duration from administration of pills to wake-up time (0.53; [0.31-0.89], F = 49.9, p < 0.001). Taking sleeping pills at a later time and a shorter interval between pill administration and wake-up time may increase patient subjective satisfaction with hypnotic agents. We propose that physicians advise patients to take sleeping pills approximately 7 h before their usual getting-out-of-bed time instead of the current standard of 30 min before bedtime. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 08/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pruritus (itching) during the sleep period can present as a symptom of dermatological or systemic disease, or as a parasomnia. Sleep related scratching as a primary parasomnia, exclusively confined to sleep in the absence of coexisting dermatological disorders, has not been well described. This case series describes three such patients, and discusses potentially relevant pathophysiology that can underlie itching or pain. Such cases of sleep related scratching may merit nosologic classification apart from previously defined parasomnias. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 08/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To investigate the effect of the 2012 American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) respiratory event criteria on severity and prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) relative to previous respiratory event criteria. Retrospective, randomized comparison. Australian clinical sleep laboratory in a tertiary hospital. 112 consecutive patients undertaking polysomnography (PSG) for suspected OSA. N/A. PSGs were re-scored for respiratory events using either 2007 AASM recommended (AASM2007Rec), 2007 AASM alternate (AASM2007Alt), Chicago criteria (AASM1999), or 2012 AASM recommended (AASM2012) respiratory event criteria. The median AHI using AASM2012 was approximately 90% greater than the AASM2007Rec AHI, approximately 25% greater than the AASM2007Alt AHI, and approximately 15% lower than the AASM1999 AHI. These changes increased OSA diagnoses by approximately 20% and 5% for AASM2007Rec and AASM2007Alt, respectively. Minimal changes in OSA diagnoses were observed between AASM1999 and AASM2012 criteria. To achieve the same OSA prevalence as AASM2012, the threshold for previous criteria would have to shift to 2.6/h, 3.6/h, and 7.3/h for AASM2007Rec, AASM2007Alt, and AASM1999, respectively. Differences between the AASM2007Rec and AASM2012 hypopnea indices (HI) were predominantly due to the change in desaturation levels required. Alterations to respiratory event duration rules had no effect on the HI. This study demonstrates that implementation of the 2012 AASM respiratory event criteria will increase the AHI in patients undergoing PSG, and more patients are likely to be diagnosed with OSA. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 08/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Portable and automated sleep monitoring technology is becoming widely available to consumers, and one wireless system (WS) has recently surfaced as a research tool for sleep and sleep staging assessment outside the hospital/laboratory; however, previous research findings indicate low sensitivity for wakefulness detection. Because difficulty discriminating between wake and sleep is likely to affect staging performance, we sought to further evaluate the WS by comparing it to the gold-standard polysomnography (PSG) and actigraphy (ACT) for overall sleep/wakefulness detection and sleep staging, within high and low sleep efficiency sleepers. Twenty-nine healthy adults (eight females) underwent concurrent WS, PSG, and ACT assessment in an overnight laboratory study. Epoch-by-epoch agreement was determined by comparing sleep/wakefulness decisions between the WS to both PSG and ACT, and for detection of light, deep, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep stages between the WS and PSG. Sensitivity for wakefulness was low (40%), and an overestimation of total sleep time and underestimation of wake after sleep onset was observed. Prevalence and bias adjusted kappa statistic indicated moderate-to-high agreement between the WS and PSG for sleep staging. However, upon further inspection, WS performance varied by sleep efficiency, with the best performance during high sleep efficiency. The benefit of the WS as a sleep monitoring device over ACT is the ability to assess sleep stages, and our findings suggest this benefit is only realized within high sleep efficiency. Care should be taken to collect data under conditions where this is expected. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 08/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 08/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 08/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To investigate whether low levels of physical activity were associated with an increased occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), OSA-related symptoms, and cardiometabolic risk. A case-control study design was used. OSA cases were patients referred to a sleep clinic for suspected OSA (n = 2,340). Controls comprised participants from the Busselton community (n = 1,931). Exercise and occupational activity were derived from questionnaire data. Associations were modelled using logistic and linear regression and adjusted for confounders. In comparison with moderate exercise, the high, low, and nil exercise groups had an odds ratio (OR) for moderate-severe OSA of 0.6 (95% CI 0.5-0.8), 1.6 (95% CI 1.2-2.0), and 2.7 (95% CI 1.9-3.7), respectively. Relative to men in heavy activity occupations, men in medium, light and sedentary occupations had an OR for moderate-severe OSA of 1.7 (95% CI 1.1-2.5), 2.1 (95% CI 1.4-3.2), and 1.8 (95% CI 1.2-2.8), respectively. Relative to women in medium activity occupations, women in light and sedentary occupations had an OR for moderate-severe OSA of 4.2 (95% CI 2.6-7.2) and 3.5 (2.0-6.0). OSA patients who adequately exercised had lower: levels of doctor-diagnosed depression (p = 0.047); symptoms of fatigue (p < 0.0001); systolic (p = 0.015) and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.015); and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p = 0.003). Low levels of physical activity were associated with moderate-severe OSA. Exercise in individuals with OSA is associated with lower levels of depression, fatigue, blood pressure and CRP. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 08/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hypersomnia of central origin from narcolepsy or idiopathic hypersomnia (IHS) is characterized by pathological levels of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Central hypersomnia has historically been underdiagnosed and poorly understood, especially with respect to its impact on daytime functioning and quality of life in children. Describe the psychosocial adjustment of children treated for narcolepsy or IHS on school performance, quality of life, and physical/ extracurricular activities. Using a matched case control design, we compared child self- and parent-reported data from thirty-three 8- to 16-year-olds with an established diagnosis of narcolepsy or IHS, according to ICSD-2 criteria, to that of 33 healthy children matched by age, race/ ethnicity, gender, and household income. Assessments evaluated academic performance, quality of life and wellness, sleepiness, and participation in extracurricular activities. Compared to healthy controls, children with central hypersomnia had poorer daytime functioning in multiple domains. Children with hypersomnia missed more days of school and had lower grades than healthy controls. Children with hypersomnia had poorer quality of life by both parent and child report. Children with hypersomnia were significantly sleepier, had higher BMI, and were more likely to report a history of recent injury. Finally, children with hypersomnia engaged in fewer after-school activities than healthy controls. A range of significant psychosocial consequences are reported in children with hypersomnia even after a diagnosis has been made and treatments initiated. Health care professionals should be mindful of the psychosocial problems that may present in children with hypersomnia over the course of treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 08/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sleep disturbance is a hallmark feature of cannabis withdrawal. In this study we explored the effects of lithium treatment supplemented with nitrazepam on objective and subjective measures of sleep quality during inpatient cannabis withdrawal. Treatment-seeking cannabis-dependent adults (n = 38) were admitted for 8 days to an inpatient withdrawal unit and randomized to either oral lithium (500 mg) or placebo, twice daily in a double-blind RCT. Restricted nitrazepam (10 mg) was available on demand (in response to poor sleep) on any 3 of the 7 nights. Dependent outcome measures for analysis included repeated daily objective actigraphy and subjective sleep measures throughout the 8 day detox, subjective cannabis withdrawal ratings, and detoxification completion rates. Based on actigraphy, lithium resulted in less fragmented sleep compared to placebo (p = 0.04), but no other objective measures were improved by lithium. Of the subjective measures, only nightmares were suppressed by lithium (p = 0.04). Lithium did not have a significant impact on the use of nitrazepam. Sleep bout length (p < 0.0001), sleep efficiency (p < 0.0001), and sleep fragmentation (p = 0.05) were improved on nights in which nitrazepam was used. In contrast, only night sweats improved with nitrazepam from the subjective measures (p = 0.04). A Cox regression with daily repeated measures of sleep efficiency averaged across all people in the study a predictor suggests that a one-unit increase in sleep efficiency (the ratio of total sleep time to the total time in bed expressed as a percentage) resulted in a 14.6% increase in retention in treatment (p = 0.008, Exp(B) = 0.854, 95% CI = 0.759 - 0.960). None of the other sleep measures, nor use of lithium or nitrazepam were significantly associated with retention in treatment. Lithium seems to have only limited efficacy on sleep disturbance in cannabis withdrawal. However the nitrazepam improved several actigraphy measures of sleep disturbance, warranting further investigation. Discord between objective and subjective sleep indices suggest caution in evaluating treatment interventions with self-report sleep data only. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 08/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many youth struggle with adherence to bilevel noninvasive ventilation (NIV), often shortly after initiation of treatment. Anecdotal evidence suggests youths with comorbid obesity struggle with adherence while youths with comorbid neuromuscular disease demonstrate better adherence rates. The objective of this study was to explore factors relating to bilevel NIV adherence, and to compare these between youths with underlying obesity or neuromuscular disease. An exploratory qualitative approach was used to examine youth and caregivers' experiences with and perceptions of bilevel NIV. Semi-structured interviews (n = 16) of caregivers and youths were conducted. Youths 12 years and older with nocturnal hypoventilation diagnosed on polysomnography and managed with bilevel NIV, with either concurrent obesity or neuromuscular disease were included. Thematic analysis of interview data was conducted using qualitative analysis software. Factors associated with positive bilevel NIV adherence included previous encouraging experiences with therapy; subjective symptom improvement; familiarity with medical treatments; understanding of nocturnal hypoventilation and its consequences; family and health-care team support; and early adaptation to treatments. Factors associated with poor bilevel NIV adherence included previous negative experiences with therapy, negative attitude towards therapy; difficulty adapting; perceived lack of support from family or health-care team; fear/ embarrassment regarding treatment; caregivers not being health-minded; technical issues; side effects; and a lack of subjective symptom improvement. The dimensions which most affect adherence to bilevel NIV are those which contribute to youths' conception of feeling "well" or "unwell." Adherence to treatment may hinge largely on the way in which NIV is initially experienced and framed. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 07/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the diagnostic capability of signs and symptoms of sleep bruxism (SB) as per the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) criteria and a diagnostic grading system proposed by international experts for assessing SB. The study was conducted in three phases (interview, physical examination, and sleep studies). Subjects were asked about self-reported tooth grinding sounds occurring during sleep, muscle fatigue, temporal headaches, jaw muscle pain, and jaw locking. A visual examination was conducted to check for presence of abnormal tooth wear. A full-night polysomnography (PSG) was performed. After three phases, the subjects were divided into two groups matched by age and gender: Case Group, 45 SB subjects, and Control Group, 45 non-SB subjects. Diagnostic accuracy measurements were calculated for each sign or symptom individually and for the two diagnostic criteria analyzed. Muscle fatigue, temporal headaches, and AASM criteria were associated with highest sensitivity (78%, 67%, 58%, respectively) and also with highest diagnostic odds ratio (OR = 9.63, 9.25, 6.33, respectively). Jaw locking, muscle pain, and the criterion of "probable SB" were associated with the worst sensitivity (16%, 18%, 22%, respectively). Presence of muscle fatigue and temporal headaches can be considered good tools to screen SB patients. None of the diagnostic criteria evaluated was able to accurately identify patients with SB. AASM criteria had the strongest diagnostic capabilities and-although they do not attain diagnostic values high enough to replace the current gold standard (PSG)-should be used as a screening tool to identify SB. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 07/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Tracheostomy has demonstrated effectiveness in the control of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in most patients; however, current evidence suggests significant sleep disordered breathing may persist, particularly in morbidly obese individuals. While several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, we demonstrate evidence of a previously unidentified pathophysiology: excessive dynamic airway collapse (EDAC) of the lower airway. We present the case of a 62-year-old woman status post tracheostomy with persistent dyspnea in the supine position. Both radiographic and bronchoscopic images demonstrate prolapse of the posterior membranous trachea at the level of the trachea and mainstem bronchi with partial or complete obstruction. The prolapse was completely relieved with upright positioning or positive airway pressure. This case illustrates a novel mechanism of post-tracheostomy sleep disordered breathing in obese individuals and emphasizes the need to consider follow-up polysomnography after tracheostomy in this patient population, especially those with persistent symptoms related to sleep or the supine position. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 07/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 07/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 07/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 07/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A controversy exists concerning the relationship, if any, between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the anatomical position of the anterior teeth. Specifically, there has been speculation that extraction orthodontics and retraction of the anterior teeth contributes to OSA by crowding the tongue and decreasing airway space. This retrospective study utilized electronic medical and dental health records to examine the association between missing premolars and OSA. The sample (n = 5,584) was obtained from the electronic medical and dental health records of HealthPartners in Minnesota. Half of the subjects (n = 2,792) had one missing premolar in each quadrant. The other half had no missing premolars. Cases and controls were paired in a 1:1 match on age range, gender, and body mass index (BMI) range. The outcome was the presence or absence of a diagnosis of OSA confirmed by polysomnography. Of the subjects without missing premolars, 267 (9.56%) had received a diagnosis of OSA. Of the subjects with four missing premolars, 299 (10.71%) had received a diagnosis of OSA. The prevalence of OSA was not significantly different between the groups [OR = 1.14, p = 0.144]. The absence of four premolars (one from each quadrant), and therefore a presumed indicator of past "extraction orthodontic treatment," is not supported as a significant factor in the cause of OSA. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 07/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 07/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 07/2015;