Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: American Academy of Sleep Medicine, American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Journal description

Current impact factor: 2.83

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.826
2012 Impact Factor 2.928
2011 Impact Factor 3.232

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 4.10
Immediacy index 0.47
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.00
Other titles Journal of clinical sleep medicine, JCSM
ISSN 1550-9397
OCLC 55687194
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Journal is deposited in PubMed Central for public release after 6 months
    • Written permission must be given for deposit by other means.
  • Classification
    ​ white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism resulting in copper accumulation in a number of organs including the liver, brain, and cornea, predominantly leading to hepatic, neurologic, and psychiatric manifestations. An association between WD and sleep problems is not commonly recognized, and sleep complaints are often overlooked. Daytime hypersomnolence is even more rarely reported in this population. We report a case of WD and hypersomnolence objectively confirmed by a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Consequently, we suggest that increased awareness, assessment, and treatment of sleep disorders, including daytime sleepiness, may help improve patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 04/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is associated with cardiovascular disease such as hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy in middle-aged patients; however, this association is not well described in the elderly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of unrecognized SDB on cardiac function and remodeling in a population-based sample of healthy elderly without cardiac disease. A total of 405 healthy elderly (age >65 years) were examined by echocardiography and respiratory polygraphy. According to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), subjects were stratified in four categories: snorers (AHI ≤5), mild (AHI: 5-15), moderate (AHI: 15-30), and severe (AHI ≥30) cases. Comparative analysis between snorers and SDB cases revealed that left atrial (LA) diameter and surface increased according to SDB severity (p < 0.05) without differences in LA mass index. In subjects with an AHI ≥30, an increase was found for LV end-diastolic and end-systolic dimension (p < 0.001), as well as for LV mass (p < 0.03) and LV index (p < 0.05). The current study showed a weak but significant correlation between altered LA and LV measurements versus AHI and hypoxemia indices (p < 0.001). In the regression analysis, AHI and hypoxemia had a minimal effect, body mass index and male gender being the most significant predictors. In a population of healthy elderly with SDB, slight changes in left atrial and ventricular measurements occur in severe cases (AHI ≥30). Irrespective of the lack of a strong association between SDB and cardiac dysfunction, the presence of slight cardiac pathology in severe SDB cases might be considered. NCT 00759304 and NCT 00766584. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is a syndrome characterized by the occurrence of sleep-related seizures of variable complexity and duration. Hypermotor seizures (HMS) represent a classic manifestation of this syndrome, associated with a perturbation of the ventromesial frontal cortex and anterior cingulate gyrus regions. Nevertheless, in recent years, reports have showed that the seizure onset zone (SOZ) need not be of frontal origin to generate HMS. Here we report an unusual case of a patient presenting with a seven-year history of drug-resistant sleep-related HMS arising from the mesial parietal region. The presence of an infrequent feeling of levitation before the HMS was key to suspecting a subtle focal cortical dysplasia in the right precuneus region. A stereo-EEG investigation confirmed the extra-frontal seizure onset of the HMS and highlighted the interrelationship between unstable sleep and seizure precipitation. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The American Society of Anesthesia practice guidelines recommend that pediatric and adult patients who undergo ambulatory surgery be screened for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). With this in mind, our objective was to assess the frequency of screening by anesthesia providers for the signs and symptoms of OSA in children undergoing surgery in an ambulatory setting. Prospective single-blinded observational study of anesthesia providers' preoperative interview of caregivers of consecutive patients younger than age 18 who were scheduled for ambulatory surgery. One hundred one children (30 females) were identified, with a mean age of 6.9±5.0 years; 54 were classified as white, 33 as black, and 14 as other. Total OSA-18 scores ranged from 18 to 97, with a mean of 33.1±14.8. The mean score for adenotonsillectomy patients was higher than that for children who underwent procedures other than adenotonsillectomy. Thirty-one percent of children were screened for OSA, and snoring was the most common symptom recorded (28%). Patients who were screened for OSA were more likely to have snoring (p < 0.001), known OSA (p = 0.006), and a scheduled adenotonsillectomy (p = 0.02). OSA was not routinely screened for by anesthesia providers prior to ambulatory pediatric surgery. When screening did occur, "snoring" was the most commonly recorded symptom. Paradoxically, patients with undiagnosed OSA who would benefit the most from screening were the least likely to be screened. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To determine prevalence of depressive symptoms in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the impact of OSA treatment on depression scores. Consecutive new patients referred for investigation of suspected OSA were approached. Consenting patients completed a Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for depressive symptoms when attending for laboratory polysomnography (PSG). Those with moderate/ severe (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥15 events/h) and/ or symptomatic mild OSA (AHI 5 to <15 events/h) were offered continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. PHQ-9 was repeated after 3 months of CPAP with compliance recorded. Of a maximum PHQ-9 score of 27, a cut point ≥10 (PHQ-9≥10) was used to indicate presence of clinically significant depressive symptoms. A total of 426 participants (243 males) were recruited. Mean (±SD) body mass index (BMI) was 32.1±7.1 kg/m2 and AHI 33.6±28.9 events/h. PHQ-9 was 10.5±6.1 and independently related to AHI (p < 0.001) and BMI (p < 0.001). In those without OSA, PHQ-9≥10 was more common in women, but no gender difference was evident with OSA. Of 293 patients offered CPAP, 228 were compliant (mean nightly use >5 h) over 3 months of therapy. In them, with therapy, AHI decreased from 46.7±27.4 to 6.5±1.6 events/h, PHQ-9 from 11.3±6.1 to 3.7±2.9 and PHQ-9≥10 from 74.6% to 3.9% (p < 0.001 in each case). Magnitude of change in PHQ-9 was similar in men and women. Antidepressant use was constant throughout. Depressive symptoms are common in OSA and related to its severity. They improve markedly with CPAP, implying a relationship to untreated OSA. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has been shown to improve both sleep and depressive symptoms, but predictors of depression outcome following CBT-I have not been well examined. This study investigated how chronotype (i.e., morningness- eveningness trait) and changes in sleep efficiency (SE) were related to changes in depressive symptoms among recipients of CBT-I. Included were 419 adult insomnia outpatients from a sleep disorders clinic (43.20% males, age M±SD = 48.14±14.02). All participants completed the Composite Scale of Morningness and attended a 6-session group CBT-I up to the second last session. SE was extracted from sleep diary; depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) prior to (Baseline), and at the end (End) of intervention. Multilevel structural equation modeling revealed that from Baseline to End, SE increased and BDI decreased significantly. Controlling for age, sex, BDI, and SE at Baseline, stronger evening chronotype and less improvement in SE significantly and uniquely predicted less reduction in BDI from Baseline to End. Chronotype did not predict improvement in SE. In an insomnia outpatient sample, SE and depressive symptoms improved significantly after a CBT-I group intervention. All chronotypes benefited from sleep improvement, but those with greater eveningness and/or less sleep improvement experienced less reduction in depressive symptom severity. This suggests that evening preference and insomnia symptoms may have distinct relationships with mood, raising the possibility that the effect of CBT-I on depressive symptoms could be enhanced by assessing and addressing circadian factors. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is the case of a 34-year-old woman with severe narcolepsy with cataplexy who experienced a dramatic reduction in cataplexy symptoms after resection of a right parietal astrocytoma. The patient underwent detailed neurological exam, neuropsychological testing, polysomnography and multiple sleep latency testing following surgery. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Epidemiologic studies have shown that chronic short sleep may be associated with the development of hypertension; however, the results are controversial. This meta-analysis was conducted to determine whether the duration of sleep is associated with hypertension. Reference databases (PubMed, EmBase, the Cochrane Library, Chinese Biological Medicine database) were searched for studies related to sleep duration and hypertension. Sleep duration categories (≤5 h, 6 h, 7 h, 8 h, ≥9 h) and prevalence or incidence of hypertension in each sleep category were extracted. A general analysis and subgroup analyses stratified by gender, age, study design, and different definitions of sleep duration were conducted to evaluate the relationship between sleep duration and hypertension. Thirteen articles out of a total of 1628 articles involving 347,759 participants met the inclusion criteria. A U-shaped change in pooled odds ratios (ORs) for hypertension due to the change of sleep duration was observed. The unadjusted OR for hypertension of individuals who slept ≤5 h vs 7 h was 1.61,95% CI = 1.28-2.02; those who slept ≥9 h vs 7 h was 1.29,95% CI = 0.97-1.71. The pooled ORs were still significant after adjusted by age and gender. Women deprived of sleep (sleep time ≤5 h vs 7 h, OR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.39-2.03) had a higher risk of hypertension than men (OR = 1.30, 95%CI = 0.93-1.83). Excessively longer and shorter periods of sleep may both be risk factors for high blood pressure; these associations are stronger in women than men. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ventilation with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard therapy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, it was recently suggested that a novel mode of ventilation, Bilevel-auto, could be equally effective in treating patients unable to tolerate CPAP. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of Bilevel-auto to treat OSA patients whose nocturnal ventilatory disturbances are not completely corrected by CPAP. We enrolled 66 consecutive OSA patients, not responsive to (group A) or intolerant of (group B) CPAP treatment, after a full night of manual CPAP titration in a laboratory. Full polysomnography data and daytime sleepiness score were compared for each group in the three different conditions: basal, during CPAP, and during Bilevel-auto. The apnea-hypopnea index decreased significantly during CPAP in both groups; however, in the group A, there was a further significant improvement during Bilevel-auto. The same trend was observed for oxygenation indices, while the distribution and the efficiency of sleep did not differ following the switch from CPAP to Bilevel-auto. This study confirmed the role of Bilevel-auto as an effective therapeutic alternative to CPAP in patients intolerant of this latter mode of ventilation. Moreover, extending the use of Bilevel-auto to those OSA patients not responsive to CPAP, we showed a significantly better correction of nocturnal respiratory disturbances. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. All rights reserved.
    Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015; DOI:10.5664/jcsm.4590
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015;
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015; DOI:10.5664/jcsm.4618
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine: JCSM: official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 03/2015; DOI:10.5664/jcsm.4592