Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Society of Protozoologists; International Society of Protistologists, Wiley

Journal description

Current impact factor: 2.91

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.911
2012 Impact Factor 2.162
2011 Impact Factor 2.659
2010 Impact Factor 2.397
2009 Impact Factor 2.355
2008 Impact Factor 1.502
2007 Impact Factor 1.525
2006 Impact Factor 2.288
2005 Impact Factor 1.447
2004 Impact Factor 1.403
2003 Impact Factor 1.513
2002 Impact Factor 1.444
2001 Impact Factor 1.739
2000 Impact Factor 1.519
1999 Impact Factor 1.417
1998 Impact Factor 1.148
1997 Impact Factor 1.232
1996 Impact Factor 1.738
1995 Impact Factor 1.173
1994 Impact Factor 2

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.24
Cited half-life 8.70
Immediacy index 0.60
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.67
Other titles Journal of eukaryotic microbiology (Online), The journal of eukaryotic microbiology
ISSN 1550-7408
OCLC 47723595
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • On author's personal website, institutional repositories, arXiv, AgEcon, PhilPapers, PubMed Central, RePEc or Social Science Research Network
    • Author's pre-print may not be updated with Publisher's Version/PDF
    • Author's pre-print must acknowledge acceptance for publication
    • On a non-profit server
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher source must be acknowledged with citation
    • Must link to publisher version with set statement (see policy)
    • If OnlineOpen is available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • If OnlineOpen is available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 24 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 07/08/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Removing the requirement for cell culture has led to a substantial increase in the number of lineages of Entamoeba recognized as distinct. Surveying the range of potential host species for this parasite genus has barely been started and it is clear that additional sampling of the same host in different locations often identifies additional diversity. In this study, using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, we identify four new lineages of Entamoeba, including the first report of Entamoeba from an elephant, and extend the host range of some previously described lineages. Additionally, examination of microbiome data from a number of host animals suggests that substantial Entamoeba diversity remains to be uncovered. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 06/2015; DOI:10.1111/jeu.12249
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    ABSTRACT: Cattle (Bos taurus) are intermediate hosts for three named species of Sarcocystis, S. cruzi, S. hirsuta, and S. hominis. Recently, a fourth species was identified and named S. sinensis. However, S. sinensis was originally named for a species of Sarcocystis in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in China. Based on unverifiable evidence, it was suggested that the same parasite infects cattle. Additionally, S. sinensis was recently declared as nomen nudum because its naming violated the rules of International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. Thus, the fourth species using cattle as an intermediate host does not have a valid name. Here, we propose a new name, Sarcocystis rommeli for the S. sinensis-like parasite from cattle in Argentina, and differentiate it ultrastructurally from S. hominis sarcocysts from experimentally infected cattle. Sarcocystis rommeli sarcocysts were microscopic with a 5 μm thick wall with slender villar protrusions (Vp); the Vp were up to 5 μm long, up to 0.5 μm wide, and of uneven thickness, often bent at an angle. The ground substance layer (Gs) was up to 0.8 μm thick and smooth. Vesicular structures were seen at the base of the Vp. The bradyzoites were 10-12 μm long. Sarcocystis hominis sarcocysts had Vp that were often upright, up to 7.5 μm long, and up to 1.8 μm wide; the Gs was up to 2 μm thick and without vesicles. Its sarcocyst wall was up to 5.6 μm thick, the vp were bent at an angle, up to 5.8 μm long, the Gs was up to 2 μm thick, but without vesicles seen in S. rommeli. Beef containing sarcocysts of S. rommeli was not orally infectious for two human volunteers and a red fox (Vulpes vulpes). The Sarcocystis described here is molecularly different than S. cruzi, S. hirsuta, and S. hominis based on 18S rRNA and cox1 gene sequences. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 06/2015; DOI:10.1111/jeu.12248
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    ABSTRACT: Metopid armophoreans are ciliates commonly found in anaerobic environments worldwide, however very little is known of their fine structure. In the present study, the metopid Parametopidium circumlabens (Biggar & Wenrich, 1932) Aescht, 1980, a common endocommensal of sea urchins, is investigated for the first time with emphasis on transmission electron microscopy, revealing several previously unknown elements of its morphology. Somatic dikinetids of P. circumlabens have a typical ribbon of transverse microtubules, an isolated microtubule near triplets 4 and 5 of the anterior kinetosome, plus two other microtubules between anterior and posterior kinetosomes, a short kinetodesmal striated fiber and long postciliary microtubules. In the dikinetids of the perizonal stripe, the kinetodesmal fiber is very pronounced, and there is a conspicuous microfibrillar network system associated with the kinetosomes. A new structure, shaped as a dense, roughly cylindrical mass surrounded by microtubules, is found associated with the posterior kinetosome of perizonal dikinetids. The paroral membrane is diplostichomonad and the adoral membranelles are of the "paramembranelle" type. Bayesian inference and maximum-likelihood analyses of the 18S-rDNA gene unambiguously placed P. circumlabens as sister group of the cluster formed by ((Atopospira galeata, Atopospira violacea) Metopus laminarius) + Clevelandellida, corroborating its classification within the Metopida. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 06/2015; DOI:10.1111/jeu.12247
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    ABSTRACT: Chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14), as one kind of glycosyl hydrolase, hydrolyze the β-(1, 4) linkages of chitin. According to the sequence similarity, chitinases can be divided into glycoside hydrolase family 18 and family 19. Here, a chitinase from Nosema bombycis (NbchiA) was cloned and purified by metal affinity chromatography and molecular exclusion chromatography. Sequence analysis indicated that NbchiA belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 19 class IV chitinase. The optimal pH and temperature of NbchiA are 7.0 and 40 °C, respectively. This purified chitinase showed high activity towards soluble substrates such as ethylene glycol chitin and soluble chitosan. The degradation of chitin oligosaccharides (GlcNAc)2-5 detected by high-performance liquid chromatography showed that NbchiA hydrolyzed mainly the second glycosidic linkage from the reducing end of (GlcNAc)3-5 . On the basis of structure-based multiple-sequence alignment, Glu51 and Glu60 are believed to be the key catalytic residues. The site-directed mutation analysis revealed that the enzymatic activity was decreased upon mutation of Glu60, whereas mutation of Glu51 totally abolished the enzymatic activity. This is the first report of a GH19 chitinase in fungi and in Microsporidia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 06/2015; DOI:10.1111/jeu.12246
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    ABSTRACT: Dynein heavy chains are motor proteins that comprise a large gene family found across eukaryotes. We have investigated this gene family in four ciliate species: Ichthyophthirius, Oxytricha, Paramecium, and Tetrahymena. Ciliates appear to encode more dynein heavy chain genes than most eukaryotes. Phylogenetic comparisons demonstrated that the last common ancestor of the ciliates that were examined expressed at least 14 types of dynein heavy chains with most of the expansion coming from the single-headed inner arm dyneins. Each of the dyneins most likely performed different functions within the cell. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 06/2015; DOI:10.1111/jeu.12245
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    ABSTRACT: A new myxosporean species is described from the muscle of the Amazonian freshwater fish Chaetobranchopsis orbicularis (Teleostei, Cichlidae), with basis on morphometric, ultrastructural and molecular data. Numerous myxospores were observed within pseudocysts located on the hosts' dorsal and ventral muscles, near the neural spines and neural canal (spinal cord). Mature myxospores quadrangular with rounded ends in apical view, measuring 4.3 (3.6 - 5.0) μm in length and 5.1 (4.2 - 5.8) μm in width. The myxospores wall is formed by four symmetric valves. Within, four pyriform polar capsules, 2.1 (1.7 - 2.6) μm long and 1.3 (0.9 - 1.7) μm wide, located two by two in opposite sides of the myxospores longitudinal axis, each containing a polar filament forming 2 - 3 coils. Molecular analysis of the SSU rRNA gene by Maximum Likelihood, Neighbor-Joining and Maximum Parsimony confirms the parasite as a new member of the genus Kudoa, herein named Kudoa orbicularis n. sp., the second species of its genus reported from the South American freshwater fauna, and the fourth species worldwide known to occur in the freshwater environment. Furthermore, its sequence of the SSU rRNA gene constitutes the first entry of a freshwater Kudoa species in GenBank. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 06/2015; DOI:10.1111/jeu.12244
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    ABSTRACT: Two populations of Epistylis chlorelligerum Shen, 1980, a colonial limnetic peritrich ciliate, were collected from different locations in China: E. chlorelligerum 1 from West Lake, Hangzhou; E. chlorelligerum 2 from East Lake, Wuhan. The morphology, infraciliature and SSU rRNA gene sequence of the two populations were investigated based on living and protargol-stained specimens. Although both populations are consistent with previous descriptions of protargol-stained specimens of this species, some differences in the morphology in vivo were observed. The two populations had identical SSU rRNA gene sequences. A second species, Epistylis chrysemydis Bishop and Jahn, 1941, was also collected from East Lake, Wuhan, and was investigated for its morphology, infraciliature and SSU rRNA gene sequence. Phylogenetic analyses based on SSU rRNA gene sequence data indicate that the two populations of E. chlorelligerum are nested within the Epistylididae clade near E. wenrichi and E. urceolata. Epistylis chrysemydis is sister to the group comprising E. chlorelligerum, E. wenrichi and E. urceolata. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 06/2015; DOI:10.1111/jeu.12243
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    ABSTRACT: Polytomella strain SAG 63-10 was first described by Pringsheim (1963) as Polytomella piriformis nomen nudum. The current study validates the name P. piriformis following the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN). We present 18S rRNA sequences of SAG 63-10 and several other Polytomella strains, which, along with existing mitochondrial DNA sequences, clearly distinguishes P. piriformis n. sp. from other available Polytomella species. The first type material of the species is presented, as well as an illustration and micrographs. Our own observations of P. piriformis SAG 63-10 are compared to Pringsheim's description and to descriptions of other valid Polytomella spp. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 06/2015; DOI:10.1111/jeu.12241
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    ABSTRACT: Over the last few years multiple studies have been published outlining chloroplast genomes that represent many of the photosynthetic euglenid genera. However, these genomes were scattered throughout the euglenophyceaean phylogenetic tree, and focused on comparisons with E. gracilis. Here, we present a study exclusively on taxa within the Euglenaceae. Six new chloroplast genomes were characterized, those of Cryptoglena skujai, Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris, Euglena viridis, Euglenaria anabaena, Monomorphina parapyrum, and Trachelomonas volvocina, and added to six previously published chloroplast genomes to determine if trends existed within the family. With this study: at least one genome has now been characterized for each genus, the genomes of different strains from two taxa were characterized to explore intra-specific variability, and a second taxon has been characterized for the genus Monomorphina to examine intra-generic variability. Overall results showed a large amount of variability among the genomes, though a few trends could be identified both within Euglenaceae and within Euglenophyta. In addition, the intra-specific analysis indicated that the similarity of a genome sequence between strains was taxon dependent, and the intra-generic analysis indicated that the majority of the evolutionary changes within the Euglenaceae occurred inter-generically. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 05/2015; DOI:10.1111/jeu.12235
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    ABSTRACT: Each of the seven mating types of Tetrahymena thermophila is determined by a pair of large genes, MTA and MTB, whose expression peaks at early conjugation. Each protein consists of a mating type specific domain and a common transmembrane domain. To assess variation in natural populations, regions of both domains from wild isolates expressing mating types V and VII were analyzed. Corresponding regions of amicronucleates incapable of mating also were examined. MTA and MTB showed high haplotype diversity, with greater sequence variation in MTB. Mating type VII was less variable than mating type V, suggesting more recent origin. No polymorphism distinguished between mat1 and mat2-like alleles encoding different arrays of mating types, nor did polymorphisms give evidence of population structure. MTA and MTB variants have different phylogenies, suggesting independent rather than concerted evolution, and are under weak purifying selection. Codon usage is less biased than for housekeeping genes, and reassigned glutamine encoding stop codons are preferentially used. Amicronucleate T. thermophila and closely related nsp15 and nsp25 have higher levels of nucleotide and amino acid substitution, consistent with cox1 distances. The results suggest that complete sequencing of mating type genes of wild isolates coupled with functional analysis will be informative. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 05/2015; DOI:10.1111/jeu.12233
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    ABSTRACT: Dinoflagellates are one of the last major lineages of eukaryotes for which little is known about genome structure and organization. We report here the sequence and gene structure of a clone isolated from a cosmid library which, to our knowledge, represents the largest contiguously sequenced dinoflagellate genomic tandem gene array. These data, combined with information from a large transcriptomic library, allowed a high level of confidence of every base pair call. This degree of confidence is not possible with PCR-based contigs. The sequence contains an intron-rich set of five highly-expressed gene repeats arranged in tandem. One of the tandem repeat gene members contains an intron 26,372 bp long. This study characterizes a splice-site consensus sequence for dinoflagellate introns. Two to nine base pairs around the 3' splice site are repeated by an identical two to nine base pairs around the 5' splice site. The 5' and 3' splice sites are in the same locations within each repeat so that the repeat is found only once in the mature mRNA. This identically repeated intron boundary (IRIB) sequence might be useful in gene modeling and annotation of genomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 05/2015; DOI:10.1111/jeu.12230