International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship

Publisher: Berkeley Electronic Press, Berkeley Electronic Press

Description

The International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship (IJNES) is the first fully electronic peer-reviewed journal in which original papers on nursing education issues and research are published. The Editors and Editorial Board are fully committed to maintaining excellence in the quality and scientific rigor of the articles they recommend for publication. Papers involving research, innovations, issues and perspectives about nursing education, as well as responses to articles are published in IJNES. The contents of IJNES will be available at affordable subscription costs only through the Internet to faculty, practitioners, students, and libraries.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship website
  • Other titles
    International journal of nursing education scholarship, IJNES
  • ISSN
    1548-923X
  • OCLC
    54522444
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Berkeley Electronic Press

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On non-commercial authors personal website, non-commercial authors open-access university and employers institutional repository and non-commercial authors course website
    • PubMed and UK PubMed after 12 months (automatic for several journals)
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Publisher's version/PDF may be used
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Nurse educators are required to routinely evaluate students. While there is a plethora of information in the educational literature about how to write exams, develop rubrics, or evaluate clinical performance, there is a paucity of research related to teachers' experiences of evaluation. Using a Heideggerian hermeneutical approach, this study sought to answer: (1) what are the experiences of nurse educators evaluating nursing students? and (2) what do these evaluative experiences mean to the nurse educator? Thirty nurse educators from 19 undergraduate programs were interviewed for this study. Implications for nurse educators are discussed.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 04/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction The teacher student relationship is very important for a good learning environment. There should be an excellent relationship between a student and teacher in order to facilitate the learning and gain positive attitude. This relationship between teacher and student has vast influence on the learning process of the students. Method The literature review was conducted using multimodal search of different databases such as CINAHL, Pub Med, Medline, Psych Info, and Hands on searching. Results Although there is still limited empirical research about student teacher relationship on learning process, the available studies showed that literature regarding teacher-students’ relationship confirms that, positive teacher-student relationships influence students’ learning. Conclusion The essence emerged from a connected relationship (caring, support, trust and respect) which support students self confidence, fosters students’ self-trust and increases students motivation to learn, influencing their professional development towards future career pathway
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 02/2014; 6(1):167-172.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Interprofessional simulation can provide health profession program educators with an effective means to prepare future practitioners to engage in meaningful collaboration. This systematic review was conducted to identify best practice recommendations to enhance collaborative healthcare using interprofessional simulation education innovations for learners in pre-licensure nursing programs. Using a systematic review methodology, 375 articles were reviewed and 17 studies met the inclusion criteria. Based on the methodological strength of the research and the impact of the simulation innovations, the following simulation techniques were recommended: high-fidelity human patient simulators, role play, and didactic lecture and audience response didactic lecture, both followed by role play with a standardized patient. Instructor modeling was related to achievement of interprofessional competencies when compared to no modeling. Future research is needed to identify optimal timing for implementing interprofessional education innovations, for development of appropriate evaluation tools, and to determine the effects of collaborative practice on patient care.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Erratum to http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/ijnes-2012-0007.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 10(1):323-5.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract The purpose of this paper is to examine the advantages and challenges of co-supervision of doctoral students, as found in the literature and from our experiences. We define co-supervision and then discuss the process in detail. Examples are based on experiences of co-supervision from faculty perspectives as well as from the point of view of a former doctoral student. We propose that the advantages of co-supervision far outweigh the challenges and should be regularly considered by seasoned academics to enhance student learning. In addition, we suggest that co-supervision is intellectually stimulating for academics.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Nursing programs are increasingly offering international clinical experiences as part of nursing curricula. The purpose of this study was to understand what motivates student nurses to take part in these experiences. Related to motivation, student awareness of emerging nursing discourses on global citizenship was also examined. As part of a qualitative study, nine undergraduate nursing students were interviewed about their motivations for choosing a clinical placement to a low-income country. While students appeared to have a sincere desire to make a difference, closer examination of the data revealed that the majority approached their international clinical placement in ways that could be construed as paternalistic to some degree, rather than reflective of broader professional imperatives such as social justice. This finding suggests that additional education preparation may be needed prior to these experiences; global citizenship frameworks may be helpful in shifting perspectives towards a more critical enquiry of global issues.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Nursing programs encounter barriers to clinical education, which may include limited clinical capacity for nursing students. Congestion of clinical placements compounded by multiple external influences prompted a need to develop an alternative approach for meeting program standards pertaining to clinical education. A curriculum improvement project was implemented within a school of nursing with the primary goal of expanding clinical learning opportunities while maintaining program quality. The unique aspect of this project was a comprehensive evaluative design, including qualitative responses from students, faculty, and clinical site stakeholders, as well as standardized student test scores. Augmenting the tools and processes for evaluation of clinical learning required collaboration from the faculty. Project outcomes include expanded clinical capacity, increased variety of clinical learning experiences, and improved quality of the clinical experiences. Collaborative partnerships yielded valuable lessons, which have implications for other nursing programs challenged with clinical placements.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(11).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Strategic planning for nursing education, when seen through a faculty lens creates a deeper, more meaningful critical analysis of effective program development. New strategies are required for academic institutions to transform their curricula to meet the needs of a dynamic healthcare and changing global environment to provide quality education for students. In this article, an evidence-informed process is presented that was progressively co-created by the faculty and facilitators. Seminal business frameworks, leadership development philosophies, and innovative interventions enabled faculty to become engaged and developed as they created a strategic plan for a future-driven nursing program. Phase One presents the process of developing a strategic plan for excellence in nursing education by leveraging faculty potential and preparing for an upcoming accreditation. In Phase Two, four team members from Phase One continue as part of Phase Two team serving as the collective memory for this initial work. This method of strategic planning encouraged faculty engagement and leadership and laid the groundwork for a positive culture change among nursing faculty.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract After their initial training, preceptors report a lack of ongoing support specifically in dealing with preceptor-identified areas of unsafe practice: the inability to demonstrate knowledge and skills, attitude problems, unprofessional behavior, and poor communication skills. The purpose of this staff development study was to test the use of educational technology in the form of podcasts, demonstrating how a preceptor could constructively approach difficult situations using caring behaviors to engage novice nurses and to examine the relationship between preceptor support and role commitment. A correlational research design was used to examine the effects of the podcasts, continuously available through common web sites. Findings include a significant increase in the preceptor's perception of support especially among participants who had less training or experience with precepting. A strong correlation between the preceptor's perception of support and commitment to their role was also demonstrated. Preceptors suggest development of additional podcasts for ongoing educational support.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Healthcare is being confronted with questions on how to deliver quality, affordable, and timely care to patients, especially those in rural areas, in systems already burdened by the lack of providers. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) have been challenged to lead this movement in providing care to these populations through the use of technologies, specifically telehealth. Unfortunately, APRNs have limited exposure to telehealth during their educational experience, thereby limiting their understanding and comfort with telehealth. To address this problem, a telehealth program was developed at a large university that prepares Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) APRN students. The telehealth program, embedded into the DNP curriculum, consisted of a simulation workshop, practice immersion, and written project. This program was well received by students, making them aware of the benefits and barriers to the implementation of telehealth as a care delivery modality. Telehealth was embraced as students implemented the program in their own practices.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract In 2011, there was an expected shortage of 200 full-time faculty. While there are an estimated 322 graduate students in Nurse Practitioner and Masters/PhD programs in Canada today, the supply of potential new faculty falls short of the anticipated demand in the years ahead (Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing). This mixed method study explored how organizational culture and the perceived level of psychological and structural empowerment are associated with one's work environment among Canadian nursing faculty and to explore the state of mentorship in schools of nursing.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Recent research suggests that simulation education can effectively improve nursing students' practical competence and can enhance educational outcomes. But very few studies have identified the relationships between pre-course simulation and course satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pre-course simulations and other advanced learning modalities (i.e. pre-course e-learning, observation, and clinical placement skill performance) predicted students' satisfaction with an emergency nursing clinical course. Second-year Korean nursing students (N = 284) participated in an integrated clinical course consisting of self-directed pre-course e-learning, a 2-hour pre-course simulation, and an 80-hour emergency room clinical placement with observation. Multiple regression analyses found that pre-course simulation, clinical placement skill performance, observation during the clinical placement, and pre-course e-learning accounted for 47.2% of the variance in course satisfaction. Notably, pre-course simulation made the largest contribution to course satisfaction, accounting for 29.1% of the variance. Pre-course simulation, skill performance, observation, and pre-course e-learning all significantly influenced learner satisfaction. Findings suggest that integrating simulation into the clinical curriculum may enhance clinical course satisfaction.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Significant research has been done on the impact of moral distress among nurses, particularly in acute and intensive care settings. However, little research to date has investigated the experiences that nursing students have with moral distress. Additionally, there is a dearth of research on the role of nursing instructors' perceptions of their responsibilities to their students when encountering morally distressing situations. This manuscript describes a qualitative study conducted with eight mental health nursing instructors who acknowledged a responsibility for helping students deal with moral distress and ethical issues, but who also struggled with ways to do so. Additionally, instructors expressed frustration with their "guest" status on inpatient psychiatric units and their powerlessness to effect moral change in a medical model of psychiatric care.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Social justice is a fundamental value of the nursing profession, challenging educators to instill this professional value when caring for the poor. This randomized controlled trial examined whether an interactive virtual poverty simulation created in Second Life® would improve nursing students' empathy with and attributions for people living in poverty, compared to a self-study module. We created a multi-user virtual environment populated with families and individual avatars that represented the demographics contributing to poverty and vulnerability. Participants (N = 51 baccalaureate nursing students) were randomly assigned to either Intervention or Control groups and completed the modified Attitudes toward Poverty Scale pre- and post-intervention. The 2.5-hour simulation was delivered three times over a 1-year period to students in successive community health nursing classes. The investigators conducted post-simulation debriefings following a script. While participants in the virtual poverty simulation developed significantly more favorable attitudes on five questions than the Control group, the total scores did not differ significantly. Whereas students readily learned how to navigate inside Second Life®, faculty facilitators required periodic coaching and guidance to be competent. While poverty simulations, whether virtual or face-to-face, have some ability to transform nursing student attitudes, faculty must incorporate social justice concepts throughout the curriculum to produce lasting change.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Interviewing standardized patients (SPs) trained to model psychiatric disorders can promote student nurses' interview skills and therapeutic communication, while at the same time increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety. From a constructivist view of education and Kolb's (1984; Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. Edgewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall) theory of experiential learning, this article describes the development and use of SPs as a learning strategy. The use of SPs helps faculty in overcoming some of the challenges of competing for clinical sites and meeting objectives in limited clinical time. In this simulation, baccalaureate nursing students had the opportunity to interact with SPs, who had been trained to demonstrate symptoms of bipolar disorder, anxiety, and schizophrenia. During debriefing, students critiqued their performances, identifying strengths and weaknesses. The advantage to nursing students was the ability to improve their interviewing skills in a safe educational environment before encountering these patients in a clinical experience. Both faculty and student evaluations of this experience support its integration into psychiatric undergraduate courses.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract For many years, an area of research in higher education has been emerging around the development and implementation of fair and effective peer evaluation programs. Recently, a new body of knowledge has developed regarding the development and implementation of fair and effective peer evaluation programs resulting in formative and summative evaluations. The purpose of this article is to describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a peer review of teaching (PRoT) program for nursing faculty, initiated at one small comprehensive university in the northeastern United States. Pairs of nursing faculty evaluated each other's teaching, syllabi, and course materials after collaborating in a pre-evaluation conference to discuss goals of the classroom visit. Qualitative data gathered in post project focus groups revealed that faculty found their modified PRoT process to be a mutually beneficial experience that was more useful, flexible and collegial, and less stressful than their previous evaluation process.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Purpose: This concept analysis examines the Ba space in the context of interdisciplinary doctoral study in nursing and healthcare innovation in a minimal residency program. The authors identified Ba in their small, highly diverse, self-selected doctoral study group and believe Ba is an educational innovation that will prove useful to nursing and healthcare educators. Background: Ba originates from Japanese philosophy and is foundational to the birth and sustainment of environments fostering knowledge creation. Ba manifests in complex environments where participants are emotionally invested and relies on the tacit knowledge of each participant, allowing for synthesis of rationality and intuition. Method: Walker and Avant's concept analysis methodology will explore Ba's centrality to interdisciplinary education. Ba's utility and application in fostering innovation in doctoral study will be illustrated. Significance: Ba is a true educational innovation, enriching learning environments promoting interdisciplinary collaboration. Ba permits each member a voice and fosters a safe environment where relationships are created and sustained.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract The Bologna Declaration and the subsequent processes is the single most important reform of higher education taking place in Europe in the last 30 years. Signed in 1999, it includes 46 European Union countries and aimed to create, a more coherent, compatible, comparable and competitive European Higher Education Area. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the Bologna Declaration achievements in nursing education at 2010 within eight countries that first signed the Declaration on 1999. Researchers primarily identified national laws, policy statements, guidelines and grey literature; then, a literature review on Bologna Declaration implementation in nursing was conducted on the Medline and CINAHL databases. Critical analyses of these documents were performed by expert nurse educators. Structural, organizational, functional and cultural obstacles are hindering full Bologna Process implementation in nursing education within European Economic Area. A call for action is offered in order to achieve a functionally unified system within nursing.
    International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014; 11(1).
  • International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship 01/2014;

Related Journals