Journal of Nursing Scholarship

Publisher: Sigma Theta Tau International, Blackwell Publishing

Description

Reaching health professionals, faculty and students in 90 countries, the Journal of Nursing Scholarship is focused on health of people throughout the world. It is the official journal of the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International, and reflects the honor society's dedication to providing the tools necessary to improve nursing care globally.

  • Impact factor
    1.61
  • 5-year impact
    2.04
  • Cited half-life
    7.40
  • Immediacy index
    0.19
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.60
  • Website
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship website
  • Other titles
    Journal of nursing scholarship (Online), Journal of nursing scholarship
  • ISSN
    1547-5069
  • OCLC
    49216829
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Blackwell Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Some journals impose embargoes typically of 6 or 12 months, occasionally of 24 months
    • no listing of affected journals available as yet
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • Publisher version cannot be used
    • On author or institutional or subject-based server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement ("The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com ")
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'Blackwell Publishing' is an imprint of 'Wiley-Blackwell'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PurposeThe aim of this study was to develop, implement, and evaluate a theory-based intervention designed to promote increased health empowerment for marriage migrant women in Taiwan. The rapid increase of international marriage immigration through matchmaking agencies has received great attention recently because of its impact on social and public health issues in the receiving countries.Design and MethodsA participatory action research (PAR) and in-depth interviews were adopted. Sixty-eight women participated in this study. Eight workshops of the health empowerment project were completed.FindingsThrough a PAR-based project, participants received positive outcomes. Four outcome themes were identified: (a) increasing health literacy, (b) facilitating capacity to build social networks, (c) enhancing sense of self-worth, and (d) building psychological resilience.ConclusionsPAR was a helpful strategy that enabled disadvantaged migrant women to increase their health literacy, psychological and social health, and well-being.Clinical RelevanceThe findings can be referenced by the government in making health-promoting policies for Southeast Asian immigrant women to increase their well-being. Community health nurses can apply PAR strategies to plan and design health promotion intervention for disadvantaged migrant women.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeTo identify and examine the expert panelists’ visions on the future implementation of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role in Finland.Design and MethodsA policy Delphi design was conducted in 2013. A purposive sampling method was used to recognize expert panelists in the areas of advanced practice nursing (APN), healthcare management, and advanced practice nurse education. Three iterative Web-based survey rounds were conducted (n = 25, n = 22, n = 19). Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to analyze the data.FindingsThe expert panelists envisioned the future of the CNS role in Finland. This study portrayed the CNS role in Finland as generally consistent with the international role. CNS have comprehensive skills and knowledge that they use to guide and develop nursing practice; however, several threats may affect their role achievement. The existing national consensus, contradiction, and ambivalence related to CNS roles were revealed through the examination of the results, thus pointing out the areas for consideration when further developing these roles and role policies.Conclusions This is the first national study to examine the implementation of the CNS role in Finland. Expert panelists’ views regarding the CNS role will be valuable in the forthcoming national policy formulation process. Although the policy Delphi design is not often utilized, this study reveals that it is very well suited to guide and inform national and international APN policy development.Clinical RelevanceThis study contributes to CNS role development and describes the methods facilitating the essential policy formulation process.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 10/2014;
  • Journal of Nursing Scholarship 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeTo analyze content related to chronic wounds in nursing degree programs in Spain.DesignCross-sectional descriptive study.Methods Course descriptions available for online access during June and July of 2012 were reviewed for the 114 centers in Spain that offer a nursing degree, according to the official Registry of Universities, Centers, and Titles.FindingsOf the 114 centers with degree programs, 95 (83.3%) post course content online, which make it possible to analyze 2,258 courses. In 60 (63.1%) of these centers, none of the courses included the concept of pressure ulcer prevention, and the course content posted by 36 (37.9%) centers made no mention of their treatment. None of the course descriptions contained any reference to pain management in patients with chronic wounds. Of the 728 elective courses analyzed, only one was related to chronic wounds.Conclusions This review of available information about nursing degree programs in Spain indicates that pain management in patients with chronic wounds is not addressed in any course, and more courses consider the treatment of pressure ulcers than their prevention.Clinical RelevanceDegree programs responsible for the training of future nurses should be reviewed and revised as needed to ensure that graduates have acquired minimum basic competencies in the prevention and treatment of chronic wounds that help to decrease the theory–practice gap in this field.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeTo examine differences in spirituality, purpose in life, and attitudes toward organ donation between people who signed and those who did not sign an organ donor card.DesignA descriptive cross-sectional survey conducted in Israel with a sample of 312 respondents from the general population, of whom 220 (70.5%) signed an organ donor card. Data were collected during April–June 2013.Methods Participants completed a paper questionnaire and a Web-based questionnaire consisting of four sections: spiritual health, purpose in life, attitudes toward organ donation, and social-demographic questions. Descriptive statistics, t test, chi-square test, and a logistic regression analysis were performed.FindingsDifferences in mean scores between respondents who signed an organ donor card and those who did not were indicated in transcendental spirituality (p < .01), purpose in life (p < .05), and attitudes toward organ donation (p < .01). No statistically significant difference was found between the groups in the overall spirituality mean score. The spiritual transcendental dimension, individual's purpose in life, and attitudes toward organ donation explained 34.3% of the variance of signing an organ donor card.Conclusions Signing an organ donor card was found to be correlated with high purpose in life, positive attitudes toward organ donation, and low level of transcendental spirituality.Clinical RelevanceNurses should assess the patient's spiritual needs in order to construct appropriate programs for promoting signing an organ donor card. Nurses who signed an organ donor card should be encouraged to share this information with their patients.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeAfrican immigrants are one of the fastest growing immigrant groups to the United States; there is a crucial need to learn about African immigrants’ beliefs and lifestyle behaviors that may impact health. The purposes of this study were to (a) explore the perceptions and practices of Nigerian immigrants regarding healthy eating and physical activity in the United States; (b) assess the influence of cultural beliefs of Nigerian immigrants on eating and physical activity; (c) describe the role that healthcare providers can play in helping to promote healthy eating and physical activity; and (d) evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of using Photovoice to collect data on the perceptions and practices of Nigerian immigrants regarding healthy eating and physical activity.DesignQualitative visual ethnography using Photovoice.Methods Thirteen Nigerian immigrants were recruited. Data were collected using photography and focus group discussions at a church. Photovoice methodology and Leininger's four phases of qualitative analysis were used to analyze photographs, field notes, and focus group transcripts.FindingsFour overarching themes emerged from the data: moderation is healthy, Nigerian ways of living are healthy, acquiring American ways is unhealthy, and cultural context is important to promote healthy behaviors.Conclusions Photovoice was a feasible, effective methodology for collecting data on the perceptions and practices of Nigerian immigrants. Nigerian participants believed that adherence to traditional dietary and activity practices are healthy. Nurses and other healthcare providers must make concerted efforts to communicate with and educate Nigerian immigrants about healthful eating and activity behaviors within their cultural context.Clinical RelevanceThe number of African immigrants to the United States has increased dramatically. Photovoice is a creative method to learn about the health beliefs and behaviors of the Nigerian immigrant population.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 09/2014;
  • Journal of Nursing Scholarship 09/2014; 46(5).
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeTo explore nurses' perceptions of the nature of nursing work as a factor that contributes to attrition from the profession.DesignA nonpurposive sample of nurses from the Nurses and Midwives e-cohort Study in Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom provided electronic responses about reasons for leaving the profession. Data were then subjected to qualitative content analysis.FindingsNurses at the “coal face,” that is, those who actually do the work of nursing, in real working conditions, express dissatisfaction in relation to hygiene factors relating to the nature of nursing work and attribute these to nurses leaving the profession: workload, shift work, violence, and financial remuneration.Conclusions Nurses’ satisfaction with work and motivation to work are being sorely tested. There is manifest tension between the core concepts of nursing—compassion and care—and a system of work that actively precludes nurses from being able to exhibit these virtues and fails to reward them. Workload, shift work, violence, and financial remuneration are drivers of attrition and need to be addressed.Clinical RelevanceImplications from this study are fourfold: determination of nursing workload, mitigating the impact of shift work, providing safe work environments, and adequate financial remuneration.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 09/2014; 46(5).
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    ABSTRACT: PurposePopulation data concerning smoking rates of adolescents and adults in the United States and Korea (South Korea) has highlighted the need for attention to this age group. This study compared the risk factors related to smoking and examined the gender differences with other risk factors in smoking among American and Korean adolescents between 2005 and 2011.Organizing Construct and Methods Participants were students in grades 9–11 selected from nationally representative surveys conducted in 2005 and 2011.FindingsIn 2011, similar risk factors for current smoking were identified in American and Korean adolescents. These included male gender, school grade, depression, experience of alcohol drinking, current use of alcohol, use of glue or other inhalants, and experience of sexual intercourse. Among Korean adolescents, weight perception and weight control were unique risk factors for current smoking. Interactions with gender and other risk factors in each nation were revealed.Conclusions These risk factors, their change from earlier years, and gender differences should be recognized in the screening of vulnerable individuals for smoking and formulating effective intervention programs.Clinical RelevanceThese results will provide information for the design and implementation of cessation programs for adolescents in these countries.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeThe purpose of the study was to explore how nurses assess their empowerment and clarify organizational justice compared to other work-related factors. In addition, we examined the major variables pertinent to empowerment.DesignCross-sectional survey data were used.MethodsA total of 2,152 nurses returned the completed questionnaire. The instruments consisted of nurse empowerment, organizational justice, job control, and possibilities for developing work. The data analysis was based on descriptive statistics and further statistical tests.FindingsOrganizational justice and empowerment had a clear correlation. Job control, possibilities for developing work and organizational justice were statistically significant predictors of nurse empowerment.Conclusions Organizational justice and the possibility to use one's individual skills at work are significant factors in staff activity and its development in nursing. They increase the level of empowerment and commitment as well as motivation to work.Clinical RelevanceThe results of this study confirm that nurses regard organizational justice as highly important. We can facilitate both work-related empowerment and organizational justice by creating and maintaining a culture of fairness and justice. Employees should be heard and involved more in the planning and decision making of work.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeTo review the characteristics and effects Internet-based youth smoking prevention and cessation programs.DesignSystematic review of published articles in peer-reviewed journals in the past 10 years, focused on Internet-based youth smoking prevention and cessation programs.Methods Twelve articles were selected based on the following criteria: studies reporting the outcomes of Internet-based smoking cessation or prevention intervention programs for adolescents who are younger than 24 years.FindingsThe components of youth Internet-based smoking intervention programs are analyzed based on study features (i.e., sample, design, theoretical basis, analysis, outcome measures) and program characteristics (i.e., focus, setting, frequency, duration, intensity, and different components) that make the programs effective. The most common components of effective Internet-based programs are identified as the following: the use of multimedia, tailored approaches, personalized feedback, and interactive features.Conclusions The characteristics and effects of the programs vary, but most programs show positive results in youth smoking prevention and cessation in spite of the studies’ limitations.Clinical RelevanceThe evidence from this review provides useful information of recent efforts related to Internet-based youth smoking prevention and cessation programs, which can have significant clinical implications in developing future innovative youth smoking prevention and intervention programs.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeThe purpose of this article is to propose a conceptualization of career development that emphasizes the interdependence between research, practice, and policy.Organizing ConstructCareer cartography applies three decades of career development experience to lay out a systematic, comprehensive, and iterative approach for planning and communicating the outcomes of science at any career stage. To inform practice and policy, nurse researchers must be clear on the intended destination and trajectory of the science, and be skilled in communicating that science and vision to diverse stakeholders. Career cartography builds on the science of cartography, is developed within the context of public and health policy, and is composed of several components, including a destination statement, career mapping, a supportive career cartography team, and use of communication and dissemination strategies.Conclusions The successful utilization of career cartography may accelerate advancement of individual careers, scientific impact, and the discipline as a whole by guiding nurse researchers to be deliberative in career planning and to communicate successfully the outcomes of research across a wide variety of stakeholders. Career cartography provides a framework for planning a nurse researcher's program of research and scholarship to advance science, policy, and health of the public.Clinical RelevanceCareer cartography guides nurse researchers to realize their full potential to advance the health of the public and inform public and health policy in academic and practice environments.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeEvidence indicates that research participants often do not fully understand the studies for which they have volunteered. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the relationship between the process of obtaining informed consent for research and participant comprehension and satisfaction with the research.DesignSystematic review of published research on informed consent and participant comprehension of research for which they volunteer using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) Statement as a guide.Methods PubMed, Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trails, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were used to search the literature for studies meeting the following inclusion criteria: (a) published between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2013, (b) interventional or descriptive quantitative design, (c) published in a peer-reviewed journal, (d) written in English, and (e) assessed participant comprehension or satisfaction with the research process. Studies were assessed for quality using seven indicators: sampling method, use of controls or comparison groups, response rate, description of intervention, description of outcome, statistical method, and health literacy assessment.FindingsOf 176 studies identified, 27 met inclusion criteria: 13 (48%) were randomized interventional designs and 14 (52%) were descriptive. Three categories of studies included projects assessing (a) enhanced consent process or form, (b) multimedia methods, and (c) education to improve participant understanding. Most (78%) used investigator-developed tools to assess participant comprehension, did not assess participant health literacy (74%), or did not assess the readability level of the consent form (89%). Researchers found participants lacked basic understanding of research elements: randomization, placebo, risks, and therapeutic misconception.Conclusions Findings indicate (a) inconsistent assessment of participant reading or health literacy level, (b) measurement variation associated with use of nonstandardized tools, and (c) continued therapeutic misconception and lack of understanding among research participants of randomization, placebo, benefit, and risk. While the Agency for Healthcare and Quality and National Quality Forum have published informed consent and authorization toolkits, previously published validated tools are underutilized.Clinical RelevanceInformed consent requires the assessment of health literacy, reading level, and comprehension of research participants using validated assessment tools and methods.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeTo present the theoretical basis for the group process known as “Peace and Power.”Organizing ConstructA dialectic between two dominant forms of power—peace powers and power-over powers—forms the basis for a synthesis that yields an emancipatory group process characterized by praxis, empowerment, awareness, cooperation, and evolvement for individuals and groups.Methods Critical analysis of prevailing competitive group dynamics and the ideals of cooperative group dynamics was conducted to project the potential for achieving group interactions that yield profound changes in the direction of justice, empowerment, and well-being for all.Conclusions The theoretical framework of “Peace and Power” is consistent with characteristics of emancipatory integrity that are vital for social change.Clinical RelevanceThe processes of “Peace and Power” can be used to create peaceful, cooperative interactions among nurses, with other health professionals, with patients and families, and in communities.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 08/2014;
  • Journal of Nursing Scholarship 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeTo investigate forms of abusive supervision, namely personal attacks, task attacks, and isolation, and their links to outcomes for nurses, including job satisfaction, psychological strain, and intentions to quit.DesignCross-sectional survey design. Data collected from July to November 2012.Methods Two hundred and fifty public sector nurses employed at five general acute Australian hospitals completed the survey (response rate of 33%).FindingsStructural equation modeling on the forms of abusive supervision (personal, task, isolation) and nurse outcomes indicated goodness of fit statistics that confirmed a well-fitting model, explaining 40% of the variance in intent to quit, 30% in job satisfaction, and 33% in strain. An indirect relationship from personal attacks to intentions to quit, via strain, was observed. Task attacks were related directly, and indirectly via job satisfaction, to increased intentions to quit. Surprisingly, isolation was positively related to job satisfaction.Conclusions Abusive supervision impacted nurse outcomes. Specifically, personal abuse had personal and health impacts; work-focused abuse had work-oriented effects. Applying appraisal theory suggests that personal attacks are primarily assessed as stressful and unchangeable; task-oriented attacks are assessed as stressful, but changeable; and isolation is assessed as benign. The findings highlight the impact of abusive supervision, especially task attacks, on outcomes important to nurse retention.Clinical RelevanceThe findings can be used to devise programs to educate, train, and support supervisors and their subordinates to adhere to zero tolerance policies toward antisocial workplace behaviors and encourage reporting incidents.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 08/2014;
  • Journal of Nursing Scholarship 07/2014; 46(4).
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    ABSTRACT: To identify the factors associated with treatment-seeking behavior for urinary incontinence (UI) among postpartum women.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To examine factors that influence a parent's decision to donate their healthy infant's DNA for minimal-risk genetic research.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The use of drug round tabards is a widespread intervention that is implemented to reduce the number of interruptions and medication administration errors (MAEs) by nurses; however, evidence for their effectiveness is scarce.
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship 06/2014;