Current Heart Failure Reports (Curr Heart Fail Rep )

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Description

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  • 5-year impact
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  • Website
    Current Heart Failure Reports website
  • Other titles
    Current heart failure reports (Online), Current heart failure reports
  • ISSN
    1546-9549
  • OCLC
    53129493
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors own final version only can be archived
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
    • On funders designated website/repository after 12 months at the funders request or as a result of legal obligation
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Amresh Raina, Manreet Kanwar
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    ABSTRACT: Heart failure (HF) is a growing problem in the USA and other industrialized nations. HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) each make up approximately half of the overall HF burden. Although a variety of medical and surgical therapies exist for the treatment of patients with HFrEF, morbidity and mortality remain high, and cardiac transplantation, considered the current gold standard for patients with HFrEF and severe symptoms, is reserved for relatively few eligible patients. Patients with HFpEF have more limited therapeutic options, because no medical therapy to date has been shown to improve survival in these patients. With the rising prevalence of HF and its increasing role in health care expenditure, there is a substantial need for new drug and device therapies for HFrEF and, in particular, HFpEF. This forms the topic of the current review.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, a new paradigm for the development of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) has been proposed, which identifies a systemic pro-inflammatory state induced by comorbidities as the origin of microvascular endothelial cell inflammation and subsequent concentric cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. This review further discusses the pivotal role of the inflamed endothelium in the pathogenesis of HFpEF-specific cardiac remodeling. The potential importance of reciprocal interactions of the endothelium with cardiac fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes and with the cardiac neurohumoral response in this cardiac remodeling process is outlined.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Heart failure (HF) is a major public health problem affecting more than five million Americans and more than 23 million patients worldwide. The epidemiology of HF is evolving. Data suggests that the incidence of HF peaked in the mid-1990s and has since declined. Survival after HF diagnosis has improved, leading to an increase in prevalence. The case mix is also changing, as a rising proportion of patients with HF have preserved ejection fraction and multimorbidity is increasingly common. After diagnosis, HF can have a profound associated morbidity. Hospitalizations in HF remain both frequent and costly, though they may be declining as a result of preventive efforts. The need for skilled nursing facility care in HF has risen. The role of palliative medicine in the care of patients with advanced HF is evolving as we learn how to best care for this population with a large symptom burden.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: There has been a long history of the exploration into autoimmunity as a possible pathogenic factor of cardiovascular diseases from unknown cause represented by dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Autoantibodies (AAbs) have emerged either as humoral responses provoked by the release of "self-antigens" due to tissue damage or dysregulated humoral immunity itself. The pathogenic roles of some AAbs have been suggested by the findings from basic research using in vitro and in vivo disease models as well as clinical studies including immunoadsorption studies removing AAbs from patients with DCM. In this context, the importance of AAbs belonging to IgG3 subclass has also been implicated. In this review article, we summarize the findings accumulated to date regarding AAbs which have been considered to be involved in the pathology of DCM or pregnancy-related cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we discuss the significance of AAbs as a possible cause of DCM and their potential roles as a novel therapeutic target.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: For patients hospitalized with acute heart failure, health policy initiatives in the USA have drawn attention to 30-day mortality and readmission. Confusion around definitions, populations, and thus reported rates for these two outcomes is common. Among Medicare fee-for-service patients hospitalized with heart failure, all-cause mortality 30 days from the time of admission is 11.7 % and all-cause unplanned readmission 30 days from discharge is 23.0 %. Rates for Medicaid and commercially insured patients are lower. Mortality rates have been relatively stable, while readmission rates increased under the Diagnosis Related Group payment system then began decreasing under the Hospital Readmission Reductions Program. Risk models are reasonable at predicting mortality, whereas readmission has been harder to anticipate. The use of risk-standardized hospital rates as performance measures has generated considerable debate. Future work should clarify the interaction between the two measures, the optimal time window and factors influencing rates and trends-including socioeconomic status.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Worsening renal function during the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure, so-called acute cardio-renal syndrome, is very common and complicates the treatment course. The underlying pathophysiology of worsening renal function (WRF) involves variable contributions of renal hemodynamics, neurohormonal activity, and oxidative stress. Historically, WRF has been associated with adverse outcomes. However, emerging data support therapeutic strategies that permit WRF while effectively treating congestion as they are associated with improved outcomes.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) leading to right ventricular failure (RVF) is a common complication of left heart failure irrespective of the left ventricular ejection fraction. PH due to left heart disease is the most common cause of PH. The prevalence of PH and RVF in left heart failure varies depending on the patient population studied, the method used to diagnose PH, and the hemodynamic criteria used to define PH. Elevated left-sided filling pressure and functional mitral regurgitation are the two major determinants of PH in left heart failure. PH is associated with markers of disease severity, advanced symptoms, and worse long-term outcomes including heart failure hospitalization and mortality in left heart failure. RVF has independent, incremental prognostic value over PH for adverse outcomes in left heart failure. PH and RVF may be potential therapeutic targets in patients with left heart failure.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: As the population of breast cancer survivors grows, it has become evident that chemotherapy has significant cardiotoxic side effects. Echocardiography is a noninvasive, cost-effective, and widely available imaging tool that is well positioned to serve as a primary modality for monitoring chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity. Although left ventricular ejection fraction is a standard measurement by which to monitor chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity, its predictive value in identifying subsequent cardiotoxicity is limited. More sophisticated echocardiography modalities may offer improved sensitivity and specificity for detecting chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity. These include tissue Doppler imaging measures, newer techniques based upon two- and three-dimensional strain and torsion analysis, and three-dimensional measures of cardiac size. While these modalities are not all currently part of clinical practice, a body of data supporting their use is steadily building. More research remains to be performed, and noninvasively detecting cancer therapy-induced cardiac dysfunction at the earliest stages is of increasing interest.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with heart failure (HF) exhibit a wide range of symptoms, including dyspnea, sleep-disordered breathing, autonomic abnormalities, cognitive dysfunction, and neuropsychological disturbances. These symptoms, which affect quality of life and morbidity and mortality in the condition, are largely related to structural and functional changes in the brain. There are increasing reports of brain abnormalities in HF, but often the linkages between brain injury and common HF clinical symptomatology are not clearly described. In this review, we will discuss the current evidence of brain injury and the associated clinical symptoms in HF, focusing on those brain regions that are commonly damaged in the condition. We will also provide a brief exploration of some potential mechanisms for brain injury in HF.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Heart failure and COPD are very common in the elderly. As both syndromes share common risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, and pathophysiological pathways, including systemic inflammation and activation of the neurohumoral system, they frequently coincide. Because of the similar clinical presentation, diagnoses of COPD in the presence of heart failure may be difficult. If spirometry is performed, caution should be taken in the interpretation of the data, as heart failure by itself (in the absence of true COPD) may exert restrictive as well as obstructive alterations in pulmonary function testing. Once COPD is established, concurrent heart failure may impact on the accurate management of these patients as severity grading of COPD could easily be overrated, and thus there is a risk of overuse of pulmonary medication, with the risk of causing cardiac side-effects. The present review focuses on the pathophysiological interrelation of comorbid COPD and heart failure, and provides practical help on how to deal with both diseases in daily practice.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Hospital readmission rates for heart failure (HF) are increasingly seen as a quality metric and are being used to define reimbursement rates and penalize underperforming hospitals. As disease patterns shift from single acute episodes of illness to more chronic and degenerative diseases, healthcare systems across the country are grappling with the challenge of providing quality care while simultaneously controlling both readmission rates and spending. Using HF as a prototypical example of chronic illness, this review begins by describing the historical underpinnings of readmission rates and how they have become a mainstream metric of healthcare quality. It then examines the controversial relationship between hospital quality and readmission rates. The paper examines several strategies to decrease readmission rates, including discharge planning and readmission reduction programs, as well as the relationship between readmission rates and mortality rates. The principal drivers of readmissions are discussed and the impact of new readmission-based financial policy is explored as well.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Nesiritide and dopamine have been recognized for some time as potential renal adjunct therapies in the management of patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Several studies have yielded conflicting evidence of the efficacy of both medications in enhancing the renal function of patients with AHF. The Renal Optimization Strategies Evaluation (ROSE) study was a multicenter double-blind placebo controlled trial designed to assess the potential renoprotective effects of low-dose nesiritide and dopamine in AHF patients with renal dysfunction. This article will focus on previous research, summary of results, and lessons learned from the ROSE-AHF trial as well as future directions for clinical research and applications.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Risk prediction in patients admitted with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) remains a challenge. Biomarkers may improve risk prediction, which in turn may help to better inform patients regarding short-term and long-term prognosis, therapy and care. Most data on biomarkers have been derived from patient cohorts with chronic heart failure. In ADHF, currently, risk tools largely rely on common clinical and biochemical parameters. However, ADHF is not a single disease. It presents in various manners and different etiologies may underlie ADHF, which are reflected by different biomarkers. In the last decade, many studies have reported the prognostic value of these biomarkers. These studies have attempted to describe a value for statistical modeling, e.g., reclassification indices, in an effort to report incremental value over a clinical model or the "gold standard". However, the overall incremental predictive value of biomarkers has been modest compared to already existing clinical models. Natriuretic peptides, e.g., (NTpro-)BNP, are the benchmark, but head-to-head comparisons show that there are novel biomarkers with comparable prognostic value. Multimarker strategies may provide superior risk stratification. Future studies should elucidate cost-effectiveness of single or combined biomarker testing. The purpose of this review was to provide an update on current biomarkers and to identify new promising biomarkers than can be used in prognostication of acute heart failure.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In patients with acute heart failure (AHF) syndromes, little data are so far available on the relation between glucose values and insulin resistance and mortality, both in the short and long term. The present review is aimed at summarizing available evidence on the prognostic role of hyperglycemia in acute heart failure syndromes. Despite the fact that glucose values are widely measured, inexpensive, and easy to interpret, hyperglycemia in AHF patients still appears to be (or at least to have been) a neglected factor. Scarce information is available on incidence of admission hyperglycemia (especially in nondiabetic AHF patients) and data on in-hospital and discharge glucose values are lacking. Overall, the scarcity of data and the unanswered questions conjure up the need for trials investigating the clinical and prognostic role of glucose abnormalities (hyperglycemia and acute insulin resistance) on admission and during hospital stay in AHF patients. Preliminary evidence suggests that hyperglycemia is an important prognostic factor in AHF; however, whether targeting hyperglycemia via an aggressive versus permissive glycemic management strategy influences AHF outcomes remains unknown.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The article discusses the problem of motivating and encouraging patients with heart failure to perform regular exercise training. Firstly, the benefits of exercise training are presented, and rational and convincing arguments justifying its implementation in heart failure patients are provided. Secondly, the issue of overcoming barriers to exercise training implementation is considered. Finally, the role of the medical team and family members in supporting patients with heart failure in long-term adherence to recommendations is defined and analyzed. In addition, the article presents various ways of performing exercise training easily.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The number of heart failure (HF) patients living with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) as destination therapy is increasing. Successful long-term LVAD support includes a high degree of self-care by the patient and their caregiver, and also requires long-term support from a multidisciplinary team. All three components of self-care deserve special attention once an HF patient receives an LVAD, including activities regarding self-care maintenance (activities related both to the device and lifestyle), self-care monitoring (e.g., monitoring for complications or distress), and self-care management (e.g., handling alarms or coping with living with the device). For patients to perform optimal self-care once they are discharged, they need optimal education that focuses on knowledge and skills through a collaborative, adult learning approach.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Heart failure has a severe impact on different aspects of a patient's life, including sexual function. Sexual problems are common in heart failure (HF) patients, both in men and women, and are not always adequately addressed and treated in the current health care system. Several factors have been described to be related to sexual problems, such as activity intolerance, psychological factors, physiological factors, cardiac medications, recreational habits and co-morbidity. The current review summarizes knowledge that can help clinicians treat sexual dysfunction in HF patients. After a good assessment, several steps are advised, including improving HF and co-morbid conditions, discussing psychosocial problems, worries and misunderstandings, managing risk factors and considering PDE-5 inhibitors or other libido enhancing agents.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this review is to evaluate research regarding whether women with heart failure (HF) need a special approach for improving their adherence to self-care. Prior research has sampled mostly white, male populations and these results have been generalized to the population of all HF patients. After age 65, women are at a higher risk than men for developing HF. Once women develop HF they are more likely than men with HF to experience greater symptom burden, re-hospitalizations, social isolation, and higher mortality rates. In this review we will explore barriers and facilitators that women experience when performing self-care, and whether they need individualized interventions or approaches to care that are different from those for male patients with HF. Special approaches such as assessment of social support and self-care counseling when treating women with HF will be discussed, as this may improve women's adherence, thereby slowing the symptom burden and disease progression.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 04/2014;

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