Tourism in Marine Environments (Tourism Mar Environ )

Description

Tourism in Marine Environments is an interdisciplinary journal dealing with a variety of management issues in marine settings. It is a scientific journal that draws upon the expertise of academics and practitioners from various disciplines related to the marine environment, including tourism, marine science, geography, social sciences, psychology, environmental studies, economics, marketing, and many more. The marine environment has long been one of the most attractive settings for tourism. Marine tourism, as defined by Orams (Marine tourism: Development, impacts and management. Routledge; 1999, p. 9) includes 'those recreational activities that involve travel away from one's place of residence and which have as their host or focus the marine environment (where the marine environment is defined as those waters which are saline and tide-affected)'. Thus, it includes a wide spectrum of activities, such as scuba diving and snorkeling, wind surfing, fishing, observing marine mammals and birds, the cruise ship and ferry industry, all beach activities, sea kayaking, visits to fishing villages and lighthouses, maritime museums, sailing and motor yachting, maritime events, Arctic and Antarctic tourism, and many more. Tourism in Marine Environments aims to contribute to the process of theory building, and to be the leading source for research reports and analysis related to all forms of marine tourism. It is governed by an international editorial board consisting of experts in marine tourism, marine science, and related fields. This board conducts most of the manuscript reviews and therefore plays a large role in setting the standards for research and publication in the field. The Editor-In-Chief receives and processes all manuscripts, from time to time modifies the editorial board, and works to ensure a continuous improvement in quality.

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  • Website
    Tourism in Marine Environments website
  • Other titles
    Tourism in marine environments (Online)
  • ISSN
    1544-273X
  • OCLC
    67618222
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Development strategies for remote artisanal fishing communities in the less developed world often promote tourism as an alternative livelihood. However, little is known regarding the perspectives of fisherfolk in these communities on tourism as a potential livelihood. Furthermore, there is a paucity of research into fisherfolks' understanding of tourism, how they identify their roles for potential involvement in tourism, and their desire to be “developed.” This article reports on a case study of Barangay Victory, a remote fishing-based community in the Bolinao region of the Philippines. Twenty-one face-to-face semistructured interviews were conducted with community members. Methods were grounded within participatory action research and phenomenological inquiry. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Using a deductive approach, data sets were manually coded and a thematic analysis was conducted. Results demonstrate that residents rely heavily upon marine resources but, despite a reported declining fishery, the majority of fisherfolk remain satisfied with fishing as an occupation. Furthermore, although respondents stated a general willingness to engage in tourism development, the understanding of tourism (both the term itself and its potential role as a livelihood) was minimal. Thus, when considering the potential of tourism as a development strategy, though participant responses were positive, the results from this study have been interpreted as a yes that means a no. This lack of understanding of tourism as well as the expressed contentment with fishing as an occupation needs to be carefully considered when development strategies propose a livelihood shift towards tourism.
    Tourism in Marine Environments 09/2014; 10.
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    ABSTRACT: Cape Rodney–Okakari Point (Goat Island) Marine Reserve, established in 1975, is New Zealand's oldest and most visited marine protected area (MPA). This study reports on the experiences of its visitors. A self-reply questionnaire (n=305) using the real-time satisfaction (RTS) measurement was utilized to investigate peak summer visitors' activities, satisfaction levels, and knowledge of marine protection. Results revealed a diversity of visitors who primarily identify the reserve as a place to “swim with the fish.” Visitors were mostly satisfied, but were dissatisfied with a number of aspects, primarily overcrowding and the lack of parking. Results indicated there is support for stronger managerial approaches to limit visitor numbers and restrict activities such as commercial tourism.
    Tourism in Marine Environments 09/2014; 10.
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    ABSTRACT: Because of the increasing number of scuba divers worldwide, satisfaction and safety issues are crucial for success in the tourism industry. This study established characteristics of scuba diving guides to achieve diver safety along with the environmental impact concerns related to this activity. A hybrid MCDM model was used to address dependent relationships among a set of criteria. Preferences of divers towards dive guides can be calculated using ANP and DEMATEL to determine the relative weights of each criterion. The result shows that diving skill is the crucial factor for professional dive guides, including the skill in leading dives and managing problems.
    Tourism in Marine Environments 09/2014; 10.
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    ABSTRACT: Horta was the first city of the Azores Islands (Portugal) to have a marina. Over time, yachts from all over the world have brought to this city more than the expected tourism economic impact. In fact, the existence of the marina developed a nautical culture in the local population, as well as a strong symbolic relationship with the sea. The marina has become the most important structure of the city and a brand of this island. Survey results show that Horta and the marina are seen by residents as a single integrated element.
    Tourism in Marine Environments 12/2013; 9(3/4):193.
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    ABSTRACT: In this article current stakeholder collaboration in tourism development was investigated in the area Veerse Meer, a lake area situated in the southwest of the Netherlands. Since four local public organizations are involved in its development as well as multiple private stakeholders, it presents an interesting case to analyze options for collaboration. Through interviews and a discussion group with stakeholder representatives the research indicates that, despite an awareness of the importance of collaboration in tourism planning, collaboration is not seen as an effective strategy for the tourism development process in Veerse Meer. Different viewpoints, as well as the missing “sense of urgency,” are seen as major constraints for collaboration.
    Tourism in Marine Environments 01/2013; 9.
  • Tourism in Marine Environments 01/2013; 9(1/2):35-51.
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    ABSTRACT: Route tourism is a market-driven approach for tourism destination development. The concept of tourist routes refers to an initiative to bring together a variety of activities and attractions under a unified theme and thus stimulate entrepreneurial opportunities through the development of ancillary products and services. Based on the development and promotion of a coastal route extending some 900 km along the diverse coastline of the Eastern Cape Province in South Africa, this article suggests that the essential concept of coastal route tourism is simple—that of linking together a series of tourist attractions along a defined coastline in order to promote coastal and marine tourism by encouraging visitors to travel from one location to another.
    Tourism in Marine Environments 01/2013; 9.
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    ABSTRACT: Coastal dunes are challenging to manage due to their dynamic nature, vulnerable ecosystems, and recreational demand. A limited management approach was studied at Jockey's Ridge, the largest active dune on the US Atlantic coast. Visitor experience data, digital elevation models, and informal stories and photos were integrated in a case study approach. Data revealed the value of an integrated management approach that preserved the dune as a unique “living” geomorphological feature with interventions limited to the park borders. The accessibility of the dune to visitors facilitated intense, enjoyable interactions with nature. Elevation data show that the management approach has maintained the dune's unique naturally dynamic character, revealing the benefits of preserving processes rather than features.
    Tourism in Marine Environments 01/2013; 9.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Scuba diving is a popular hard adventure activity in Australia, but only limited information exists about those who participate in this tourism activity. This research investigated involvement, sociodemographic characteristics, motivations, and setting preferences of scuba divers in Eastern Australia. Diving club members (n=294) were surveyed through a web-based questionnaire. Based on the participants' involvement, five clusters emerged that differed in the involvement components. It is recommended that a holistic examination of motivations and setting preferences of adventure tourists based on the concept of involvement is important for theory development and segmentation of this group of tourists. It will contribute to a better understanding of adventure tourists' motivations and involvement.
    Tourism in Marine Environments 01/2013; 9.