Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education (J Gay Lesb Issues Educ )

Description

The Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education puts cutting-edge research studies, articles from frontline practitioners, and scholarly essays into your - and your students' - hands. With concise, jargon-free writing, this quarterly international journal delivers timely information that will keep you current with what's happening in educational policy, curriculum development, professional practice, and pedagogy. In addition to general issues, this quarterly peer-reviewed journal puts at least one in-depth themed feature in your hands with every other issue. Forthcoming themes include: Gay-Straight Alliances & GLBT Student Support Groups, Issues in Education & Globalization, Intersections Between Disabilities & LGBTQ Youth and Schools, Beyond Risk: Resilience in the Lives of Sexual Minority Youth. Subscribers to the Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education can be confident in the validity of information they find there. Each article is reviewed by an international editorial board made up of well-known educators, researchers, and figures in the worldwide LGBT community. Elizabeth Atkinson is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Sunderland, United Kingdom; Tim Bedford is Coordinator of the European Commission-supported GLEE Project; Warren J. Blumenfeld edits the International Journal of Sexuality and Gender Studies; Ronni Sanlo is Director of the UCLA Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Campus Resource Center; Didi Khayattis is the author of Lesbian Teachers: An Invisible Presence - these are just a few of the noted figures whose expertise you'll benefit from. Another unique feature of the Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education is its youth advisory board. This international group of LGBT youth, aged 16-35, brings an invaluable asset - perspectives from current/recent students - to the journal.

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  • Website
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education website
  • Other titles
    Journal of gay & lesbian issues in education (Online), Journal of gay & lesbian issues in education, Journal of gay and lesbian issues in education
  • ISSN
    1541-0889
  • OCLC
    50258753
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: This essay explores the physical, emotional, and spiritual manifestations of heterosexism in childhood education. While there is abundant children's literature dealing with gay and lesbian parents of presumably straight children, little exists in this literature that directly addresses a child's developing gay, lesbian, or bisexual orientations. The author argues that rampant heteronormalcy in children's texts must be challenged just as feminists and multiculturalists challenge the moral and social prescriptions of “conventional” master narratives. Sociological and psychological studies substantiate that children's toys, games, cartoons, songs, and books affect children's perceptions of themselves and their world; this essay therefore reminds that “traditional” fairy tales and nursery rhymes are potent cultural markers that substantively impact childhood and by extension adult feelings of self-worth and legitimacy.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2007; 4(2):55-74.
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    ABSTRACT: Hollis Sigler was an artist, teacher, and activist. Her works seductively invite us to consider fantasies and challenge to confront the monsters. Sigler's narrative artwork after 1991 focused almost exclusively on issues relating to her and her family's history with breast cancer. It purposefully calls into question the capricious nature of life and death. The gentle dollhouse imagery collides with the realities of disease, pain, and anger.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2007; 4(4):7-17.
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    ABSTRACT: How do writing teachers use technology to help students learn about lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) issues? What is the nature of writing students' learning about LGB sexual orientations and academic writing when the Internet is used as a learning tool? Participants completed a questionnaire in which they reflected on a writing assignment incorporating themes of sexual orientation as well as the use of Internet reference sources. Analysis of the responses yielded three dimensions of “Internet and Privacy in Learning about Sexual Orientation,” “Internet as an aid for writing course assignment,” and “Examination of Attitudes toward Sexual Orientation.” Implications of these findings for teachers of writing are discussed.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2007; 4(2):75-88.
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    ABSTRACT: This study develops a model for sexual orientation education at a religiously affiliated university that both respects the university's mission and promotes respect for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered individuals. This model fosters the ethical school as described by Robert Starratt, embracing diversity, promoting justice and caring, and engaging in self-critique.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2007; 4(3):113-119.
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    ABSTRACT: This article offers a theory of identity that explicates how biological, experiential, and contextual influences contribute to the ongoing development of the human sense of self–what I describe as an ecological understanding of identity. My primary goal in developing this argument is not so much to create certainty about what it means to occupy a sexuality subject position but, instead, to interrupt certainty. Hopefully, my arguments about what constitutes human identities are unsettling, making readers less sure what is meant by words like gay, lesbian, bisexual, transsexual, heterosexual, man, and/or woman. I conclude with a discussion of what these insights might suggest for teacher education and for public schooling.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2007; 4(4):39-58.
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    ABSTRACT: Educators concerned with diversity, equity, and human rights in schools share their personal and professional narratives as impetus for developing suggestions and strategies designed to help teachers, students, and administrators deepen their understandings of gender identity educational issues in an effort to support transitioning teachers in K-12 schools.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2007; 4(4):119-129.
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    ABSTRACT: In England, Section 28 of the Local Government Act 1988 came to be seen as a powerful symbol of the oppression of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) young people and their teachers. This article offers a reflective critique of research I undertook just prior to the repeal of Section 28 by Tony Blair's Labour Government in 2003. My research tried to measure changes in young LGB people's experience of schooling since 1984. I situate this research partly in a tradition of “political arithmetic” and reflect on the relationships between this form of research–that to some extent has sought to quantify young people's victim status–and government policy and guidance published since Section 28's repeal in which sexualities have either become erased and unspoken or have become what I refer to (after Fuss) as strategically essentialised. Looking to the future and the kind of policy and curriculum development that the young people in my research sample might argue for, I suggest that attention to homophobia must be combined with a pedagogic focus on heteronormativity. This poses a challenge in a difficult policy space where market-oriented, neo-liberal educational reforms seek to define certain disruptive identities as “at risk.”
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2007; 4(3):13-30.
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    ABSTRACT: This study proposes an empirically based model with a strong theoretical foundation in higher education and social psychology to better understand how the college experience influences the development of attitudes of acceptance towards lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) persons. Our results demonstrated that students develop more accepting attitudes toward LGB persons when they enroll in diversity courses, interact across race, or interact with LGB peers. In addition, we found that students' thoughts about their identity in college as well as their comfort around LGB persons are important influences on LGB attitude development.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2007; 4(3):49-77.
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    ABSTRACT: The Dowa (Human Rights) education program has become an effective method of changing concept and situations of Burakumin, a group of people that has been discriminated against in Japan. One educational strategy was to speak out their personal stories, which has become a trigger to some sexual minority teachers to come out, as well as others to establish a lesbian rights education program for adults and sexual diversity education courses at a national university.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2007; 4(4):131-135.
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    ABSTRACT: This article focuses on the concept of leadership endorsed by an urban all-girls' public school and how heteronormative ideas about female success were resisted by a group of the school's gay students through gender performances and named sexualities. The author argues that queer students are gender projects that the school uses to define and regulate appropriate behavior. Schools should define promoted goals like leadership in context with youth and urges broader consideration of how school employment conditions affect the safety of queer youth and teachers.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2007; 4(3):31-47.
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    ABSTRACT: The author reviewed 22 articles published in professional journals related to the field of education that examined the experiences of gay and lesbian teachers and related services personnel. Ten of the 22 articles were legal analyses; five were position papers; four reported the findings of empirical research studies; three were anecdotal reports. Gay and lesbian educators have been largely excluded from empirical studies in school and classroom settings. The author recommended the development of a critical qualitative research agenda that examines the school-based experiences of gay and lesbian teachers and related services personnel. (Contains 4 notes.)
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 12/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: Interpretive methodology is used to study the experiences of gay and lesbian K-12 Caucasian educators in California who consider themselves "out" within the classrooms in which they teach. Three main research questions framed this study: What are the lived experiences of out gay and lesbian K-12 educators? What are the interconnections between being out, pedagogical beliefs, and pedagogical practices? What factors support gay and lesbian educators to remain out within their classroom environments? Five main themes emerged from individual and focus group interviews with the 10 out gay and lesbian teachers. (Contains 1 table and 3 notes.)
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 12/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: In 2004, a group of high school students at a private American school in México City started the first gay-straight alliance in México. A small group of conservative parents and a Mormon principal organized in opposition. This paper details the students' struggle to keep their club and offers lessons learned about student activism, school change, and personal growth.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2006; 4(1):33-46.
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    ABSTRACT: This review essay examines three texts, Boys' Stuff, Trauma, Stress, and Resilience Among Sexual Minority Women, and From Here to Diversity, that illustrate ways lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, straight, and questioning women, men, and adolescents struggle to survive and thrive in the United States, New Zealand, Australia, and other Western societies; societies which mandate compulsory representations of (hetero)sexuality and masculinity and reinforce the marginalization of those who are outside of, or do not conform to, those representations.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2006; 3(2-3):151-157.
  • Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2006; 3(2-3):69-78.
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    ABSTRACT: While many schools and boards of education are currently forming viable partnerships with queer community organizations in an effort to build upon existing anti-homophobia initiatives, there has been an erosion of such programs in Ontario, Canada. The education system has felt the effects of almost a decade of a conservative government, including a decrease in power of locally elected school boards, the amalgamation of cities, and serious cuts to programs serving the needs of marginalized communities. The author, a former consultant at the Toronto District School Board in the Equity Department and teacher/coordinator of the Triangle Program (the only high school classroom for queer youth in Canada), traces the effects of these political changes on the program and the infrastructure which supports it.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2006; 3(4):45-57.
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    ABSTRACT: This article explores what it means to work towards shifting school cultures in order to affirm sexual diversity within the contexts of conducting research within two New Zealand secondary schools. The author charts the series of shifts in thinking and action that she has undergone as to how best to accomplish changes given the challenges that emerged during the research process. The constraints which needed to be negotiated included the ways in which understandings of sexuality and same sex desire and schooling are framed, how the roles of schools and teachers are understood, the structural realities of schooling institutions, the micro culture of the school and the macro educational context. The intertwined theoretical and methodological challenges that emerged at each stage of the research process are explored. The author shows how these were negotiated, sometimes successfully and sometimes not, in the process of conducting this research.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 01/2006; 3(2-3):5-33.
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    ABSTRACT: Teachers and teacher educators are often hard pressed to find resources that creatively integrate lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT), and intersex issues into the early stages of primary education. While there is a growing number of academics who stress the importance of addressing topics of sexual and gender diversity during the early years of schooling, it is more difficult to find classroom resources that help teachers integrate these topics into their day-to-day praxes. In 2001, when Vicki Harding saw the narrow range of family narratives and gender images within her daughter's classroom and school libraries, she and Brenna decided it was time to sit down and get creative. What started as a simple activity of storytelling and writing at home has now become the "Learn to Include Education Resource Series." It consists of two brightly coloured story books (with two more in press) authored by Brenna and Vicki (and illustrated by Chris Bray-Cotton), a Teacher's Information Sheet, a series of student activity sheets, and posters to hang in the classroom or staffroom. While still in its formative stages, the project has recently secured funding to expand the series into teacher education training and a larger set of resources. The series is intended to forge deeper understandings around the diversity of families locally and globally. This series signals the importance of community-based initiatives to pedagogy. It is time to look beyond school board resources or those in school libraries and realize that there are now many individuals and non-governmental organizations creating queer youth projects that are useful to both classroom teachers and those in academia. This article presents a review of grassroots curriculum developed for primary education on non-traditional families.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 12/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: As D'Augelli and Grossman point out, there is an underrepresentation in LGB research of "youth who have had sexual experiences with both males and females." Most of the information on bisexuality has been obtained from studies with adult samples, and it is "unclear to what extent a separate bisexual cultural identity is consolidated during adolescence." Accessing bisexual-identifying or bisexual-behaving young people may be difficult for two reasons. First, the label itself is stigmatized. Second, the figures vary depending upon whether the research has been conducted using sexual identity and/or sexual behaviour as the defining criteria. Thus, much more research is required with bisexual-identifying and bisexual-behaving youth to explore questions such as: (1) What impact does having access, no access or minimal access to bi-specific and bi-specifying youth groups and information have on young people identifying as bisexual?; (2) Given that friendships and peer group relations are of high significance to most adolescents, what are the experiences and impacts on bisexual young people in their interactions with heterosexual and homosexual peers at school?; and (3) To what extent do bisexual young people feel invalidated and Websites with relevant information by families, health services and educational systems, particularly health services provided within schools? Researchers, health providers, and educators need to ask how school policies and programmes reflect the dominant discourses of hierarchical sexual dualisms, and how these may be increasingly out of step with the shifting contexts and discourses of sexual diversity that today's young people are immersed within, engaging with, and negotiating.
    Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education 12/2005;

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