Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management (J Pharmaceut Market Manag )

Description

The Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management is a valuable multidisciplinary journal devoted to solving the problems inherent in the management and marketing of pharmaceutical products and services. The journal maintains a vigorous policy of publishing quality research reports of interest to individuals involved in the manufacturing, wholesale, institutional, retail, regulatory, organizational, and academic components of the pharmaceutical industry. In addition to valuable research and informative book reviews, each issue of the Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management regularly presents the "Poster Papers" section, providing succinct reports of pilot studies, early results, and provocative findings from investigations and similar applications. These brief reports provide early dissemination of new and valuable professional data, informing the reader of potentially important developments.

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
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  • Cited half-life
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  • Website
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management website
  • Other titles
    Journal of pharmaceutical marketing & management (Online), Journal of pharmaceutical marketing & management, Journal of pharmaceutical marketing and management
  • ISSN
    1540-8574
  • OCLC
    50177718
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Four methods that a community pharmacist could use in providing medicatioh information to patients were compared in a study involving eight community pharmacist volunteers. Each of the methods were employed at different times by each pharmacist and 549 patients were enrolled and interviewed by telephone. The research included a pre-intervention period where pharmacists used normal educational procedures and intervention periods where pharmacists used various techniques learned in a training workshop. After intervention, patients reported that pharmacists provided more information about their medications than did physicians. Both patients and pharmacists preferred the combination of verbal counseling and an information leaflet to either method alone or to an in-store reference book. Patients receiving some written information had more knowledge about side effects. Significant differences occurred between pre-intervention and intervention conditions, with those patients receiving information in any form being more knowledgeable and compliant. In addition, patient attitudes toward pharmacists were more positive when any information was provided them, regardless of the method used. Implications for management decisions regarding provision of educational services were discussed.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 1(4).
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract available for this article.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 2(4).
  • Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 10(2-3).
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the public's image of pharmacists relative to the public's image of other professional groups. A questionnaire was administered by telephone to a random sample of 150 residents of a southern metropolitan area. Respondents were asked to evaluate seven professions on (1) social standing, (2) honesty and ethical standards, (3) importance to society and nation, and (4) interesting and challenging occupation. Findings indicate that pharmacists were rated significantly lower than doctors, dentists, and clergy, but higher than university professors, bankers, and lawyers. Cross tabulations of respondents by income, age, education, and sex revealed a significant difference in the ratings of pharmacists on the basis of respondent's sex.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 6(3).
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years the drugstore industry has become increasingly competitive largely due to a set of new discount oriented competitors. To maintain or increase their competitiveness in this market, drugstores must respond by better understanding the needs of the consumer. Based upon a national survey of drugstore shoppers, this article assists the industry by providing a comprehensive description of drugstore shoppers and their experience. Included are a demographc profile of the shopper, consumer evaluation of their drugstore shopping experience, and a summary of how these shoppers spend their money. Examples of how this information can be used by management are also included.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 2(3).
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    ABSTRACT: In today's global environment, health-related threats are a top concern. These threats can come from SARS, monkey pox, chronic diseases, or bioterrorism and have accelerated the activity of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies looking for new and improved solutions. A primary challenge for these companies is transforming complex and dynamic data into a new therapeutic agent. With the high cost of drug development and only 30% of approved drugs recovering these costs, the pharmaceutical industry is under growing pressure to streamline and optimize the identification of novel therapeutic agents. Bioinformatics helps mitigate risk by enabling scientists to develop therapeutic agents where the probability of success is the highest. Bioinformatics streamlines the drug discovery process and benefits the market-driven firm. This article introduces and defines bioinformatics, presents its value, discusses the globalization of the market, and spotlights the strategies employed by Oracle and IBM with respect to their roles in the development of bioinformatics platforms.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 16(4).
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    ABSTRACT: A mail survey was conducted among Mississippi community pharmacists to assess attitudes toward the shift of drug products from prescription to nonprescription status. An attempt was also made to identify relevant pharmacist and pharmacy characteristics on which to base market segmentation strategies. A total of 272 pharmacist respondents were grouped in 2 clusters using cluster analysis. Members of the first group were virtually unalterably opposed to the shift; members of the second group (60% of the respondents) were also negative toward the shift but acknowledged some benefits of it. The former group had lower prescription volume and total sales and had experienced greater sales losses from the ibuprofen switch.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 4(1).
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    ABSTRACT: This study explored consumers' risk perceptions on the six consequences ( erformance, safety, time, financial, social, and psychological) of tReir self-treatment when compared to physician treatment for three health problems (cough, diarrhea, and coughing up blood) and two time frames (whether the consumer had each of the health problems today or several days). Performance risk accounted for more variance than any other risk components in the cases of $ough/today, diarrheattoday, and diarrhealseveral days, while psychological risk accounted for the most variance in the cases of cough/several days and coughing up blood/today.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 5(4).
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract available for this article.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 8(1).
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, there has been a continual tendency by governments worldwide to impose regulatory controls on the marketing practices of multinational pharmaceutical firms. This trend is most evident in the developing countries, where the business conduct of the pharmaceutical industry has been subject to intense examination, particularly during the last two decades. This paper traces the political experience in one developing country, Pakistan, as a professed socialist government disallowed the use of brand names for pharmaceuticals and limited the products marketed by introducing a national formulary. An accounting of this experience can be valuable to governments contcmplating controls in similar pharmaceutical marketing environments and also to worldwide pharmaceutical companies, pharmaceutical middlemen, and doctors confronted with similar regulatory movements.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 2(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Dimensions of pharmacist services were identified based on consumer importance ratings of service activities. The service activities and dimensions were then categorized according to Levitt's total product concept. Via a mailed survey, consumers rated the importance of 30 pharmacist services and noted for each service whether they had ever experienced the service. Service dimensions were identified by factor analysis, and the individual services and dimensions were assigned to core, expected, augmented, or potential product types by the percentage of consumers having experience with the service(s). Four pharmacist service dimensions resulted and were labeled as Nonprescription Drug Activities, Prescription Drug Activities, Medication Administration Activities, and Education and Informatics Activities. Low rates of experience with activities in the Education and Informatics Activities dimension suggested that it fit the potential product category. Experience with other activities led to categorizing them and the other dimensions in the expected or augmented product categories.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 16(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Sixteen years ago, Lasagna et al. conducted a study designed to determine the impact of “me-too” drugs and follow-on research on the quality and quantity of drug therapies. Using the World Health Organization's (WHO) Essential Medicines List (EML) as a template for the most important medicines used around the world, they found that in 1987, about 50% of the drugs advocated by WHO were not innovator drugs but the result of follow-on research. Irrespective of these results, critics have continued to decry molecularly modified drugs and follow-on research as a mere profit tool of the pharmaceutical industry. As the debate is yet unresolved, the Center for Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (CPHSR) at Temple University felt it was time to reevaluate the current EML to find out whether or not molecular modifications have continued to improve drug therapy. Using the same methodology as the Lasagna study, an analysis of the 2003 EML showed that 81% of the drugs on the list were “me-too” products. Furthermore, it was discovered that over 11% of the drugs were listed for more than 1 indication. Finally, an analysis of the total number of FDA-approved indications for the drugs on the list showed an average of 2.82 indications per drug. These results led to the conclusion that follow-on research is not just beneficial but essential to the advancement of drug safety, efficacy, and utilization for both developed and developing nations.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 17(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a perceived value model for explaining patients' willingness to continue use of pharmaceutical care services. A written questionnaire was administered to 154 patients in the waiting room of a pharmacist-run anticoagulation clinic in a Veterans Administration Medical Center. A path-analysis of the questionnaire data revealed that a higher perceived threat of warfarin-related problems (under the condition of not attending the clinic regularly) was associated with higher perceived benefits from clinic attendance. The higher perceived benefits were associated with lower perceived nonmonetary costs and higher perceived value of the pharmacist's services. Lower nonmonetary costs were also associated with higher perceived value. Higher perceived value was strongly associated with the patients' willingness to continue use of the pharmacist-run clinic. The model explained 69% of the variance inpatients' willingness to continue use of the pharmaceutical care service and 73% of the variance in perceived value. Goodness-of-fit indices suggested that the final model structure was a good representation of the relationship of the model variables. The perceived value model is a useful framework for explaining how patients' perceptions of pharmaceutical care services influence their continued use of the services.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 14(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of primary care physicians regarding the effects of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to 372 primary care physicians belonging to the National Association of Managed Care Physicians. A total of 76 responses were received, yielding a response rate of 21%. Frequency distributions were done to determine physicians' perceptions. Physicians perceived DTCA to affect their practices by consuming more provider time and increasing the demand for prescription drugs. Physicians did not consider DTCA to have any educational value for patients. Moreover, seven out of ten physicians felt that DTCA gives patients a distorted view of prescription drugs. Physicians considered DTCA to be inappropriate for all classes of drugs except smoking cessation agents. Additionally, physicians differed in their opinion of the effects of DTCA based on number of prescriptions written per day, frequency of use of a formulary, and region of practice. The study contributes to the scarce literature on physicians' perceptions of DTCA after establishment of the 1997 FDA guidelines.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 15(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Advertising is a medium for disseminating product information to the consumer. The information advertised will be helpful only if the intended message is received by the consumer. Misleading advertisements may lead to inappropriate comprehension of product information and thus to undesirable product use. This study evaluated consumer comprehension and interpretation of print advertisements for OTC products. Additionally, the study compared results of consumer interpretations with a panel of health professionals using a 7-point, 13-item, cognitive reaction (CR) scale. Five clinical pharmacists served as the expert reviewer panel, and 42 randomly selected students were participants in the consumer group. Fourteen advertisements were evaluated in this study. Advertisements were selected from three consumer periodicals over a nine-month period beginning January 1994. The results indicate that consumers could not identify product use (10%), age group for which the product could be used (45%), side effects (80%), and contraindications (86%) of the products. Consumers also indicated that the advertisements examined in this study did not help them evaluate information on side effects and contraindications (91%). Consumer opinions differed significantly as compared to the reviewer panel on 6 of 13 factors examined using the CR scale. The six factors were interest, similarity, misleading, complete, good, and risk. Reviewers rated the ads to be misleading, bad, and incomplete, while consumers rated them to be factual, good, and complete. Information on side effects, contraindications, and product use was not adequate in the advertisements. Consumers were not able to identify advertisements that contained misleading and inaccurate information. This could lead to inappropriate product selection leading to product misuse and adverse events.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 13(1).
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract available for this article.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 7(1).
  • Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 12(2-3).
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    ABSTRACT: The main objective of this study was to assess the effects of the generic drug scandal on pharmacists' product choice criteria. A study on attributcs that determine pharmacists' choice of multisource products conductcd before the scandal was repeated to examine how pharmacists' perceptions changed after the scandal. Myers and Alpert's determinance model was employed to identify determinant attributes in pharmacists' drug product choice decisions. In the postscandal study, 24 attributes were identified as determinant, including 23 that were identified as determinant in the prescandal study. Perceptions on two attributes changed between the prescandal 'and postscandal periods. However, perceptions on 41 other attributes remained the same, indicating the relative stability of the determinant attributes.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 6(2).
  • Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 12(2-3).
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    ABSTRACT: In July 1987 a pilot consumer survey was administered in an effort to obtain consumer reactions to the concept of feefor- service pharmacist consulting. The objective of the survey was to determine if pharmacy customers were receptive to paying a pharmacist for private consultations concerning health problems. Six predetermined hypotheses were tested usin a forced choice ques- B tionnaire. Results of the survey were ana yzed using the SPSSx Computer Pro am and Z-test calculations. Over 50% of the respondents indicate 8 that consumers would pay for a private consukation, and the fair charges most often mentioned were five dollars and ten dollars.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management 12/2011; 3(4).

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