Journal of Psychosocial Oncology (J Psychosoc Oncol )

Publisher: Haworth Press

Description

Now in its eighteenth exciting year of publication, the Journal of Psychosocial Oncology is the first multidisciplinary journal published specifically for health professionals responsible for the psychosocial needs of cancer patients and their families. This forum provides for the rapid publication of new clinical and research material to help advance clinical and helping skills, as well as exploratory, hypothesis testing, and program evaluation research on such critical areas as the stigma of cancer, employment and personal problems facing cancer patients, patient education, family involvement in patient care, children with cancer, psychosocial needs of cancer patients, hospital and hospice staff, and volunteers. The journal covers all aspects of psychosocial care of the cancer patient from infancy through geriatrics. The distinguished editorial board includes representatives from many different fields in psychosocial oncology, including education, epidemiology, health advocacy, medical oncology, neurology, nursing, nutrition, pastoral counseling, physical therapy, psychiatry, psychology, public health, social work, sociology, and surgical oncology. Special columns and sections featured in the Journal of Psychosocial Oncology include: discussions of current ethical, philosophical, and existential issues for the psychosocial oncology specialist; a column on research issues, strategies, and methodologies in psychosocial oncology; announcements of current meetings, symposia, and courses offered in psychosocial oncology; book reviews that highlight important, new book-length works dealing with specific areas of psychosocial oncology; a selective bibliography of psychosocial oncology articles appearing in other journals.

  • Impact factor
    1.04
  • 5-year impact
    1.38
  • Cited half-life
    9.20
  • Immediacy index
    0.09
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.46
  • Website
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology website
  • Other titles
    Journal of psychosocial oncology (Online), Journal of psychosocial oncology
  • ISSN
    1540-7586
  • OCLC
    50132408
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Haworth Press

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract This study explored the psychosocial functioning of 10 head and neck cancer patient-caregiver dyads over the radiation/chemoradiation (radiation or combined chemoradiation) treatment period, including the interdependence in patient-caregiver quality of life (QOL). Dyads were recruited prior to, or at the initiation of radiation/chemoradiation treatment. Patient QOL decreased across the treatment trajectory and many caregiver QOL subscales decreased during the middle of treatment. Caregiver burden increased over the treatment trajectory with levels remaining relatively low. Patients and caregivers demonstrated interdependence in QOL towards the middle and conclusion of treatment. Patients demonstrated more depression than caregivers at all time points. Results suggest that both members of the dyad should be targeted for psychosocial interventions during radiation/chemoradiation treatment period.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract This study evaluated the psychological effects of an outdoor adventure program on young adult cancer survivors (ages 18-39). The six-day adventure program included personal instruction and supervision on the basics of kayaking, surfing, or climbing. Compared to a wait-list control group, participants who took part in the program for the first time had improved (relative to pre-test) body image, self-compassion, self-esteem, and less depression and alienation. Participants who took part for the second time, although also helped by the program in similar ways, were no better off psychologically than participants who took part for the first time. Possible explanations for both the positive effects and their apparent short duration are offered.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Security of attachment is described as an inner resource that may also facilitate the adaptation of individuals during critical life adversity, even when facing end-stage illness and death. This study assessed the relation between attachment styles, patient-caregiver reciprocal empathy and patient-physician working alliance, in the terminal phase of an oncological disease. We hypothesized that the attachment security of patients, as measured by the Relationship Questionnaire (RQ), is related to the reciprocal empathy with the caregiver, as measured by the Perception of Partner Empathy (PPE) questionnaire, and to the working alliance with the physician, as measured by the Working Alliance Inventory - Short Form (WAI-S). Thirty-seven end-stage cancer patients, their caregivers, and physicians participated in the study. The PPE and WAI-S were administered twice: immediately after the hospice recovery and a week later. Our results showed a significant improvement in patient-caregiver empathy and in patient-physician alliance after a week at the hospice. Findings indicated that the patients' attachment style influenced their perception of reciprocal empathy with the caregiver and the working alliance with the physician. Patients with a secure attachment had a greater capacity to show empathic closeness with their caregivers and enjoyed a better working alliance with their physicians. Caregivers' attachment security, otherwise, did not show the same influence on empathy and alliance. Our findings support the hypothesis that patients' attachment security plays a crucial role in the relation with their own caregiver and with the physician, even at the terminal phase. Theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are explored in the discussion.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract This study investigated memories of childhood leukemia conveyed by survivors belonging to a Latin culture, exploring whether benefit findings was spontaneously reported, as by non-Latin survivors. Three hundred patients previously treated for leukemia were contacted by post/e-mail and asked to write freely about their illness experience. The 106 letters received were analysed for narrative structure and content, according to a grounded theory approach. Participants expressed most of the themes conveyed by childhood cancer survivors in non-Latin countries, and benefit finding was spontaneously reported. To the latter, the usefulness of creating and maintaining personal narratives on cancer experience, sustained by healthcare professionals, is discussed.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: Few studies have evaluated the impact of childhood cancer on parents' occupational/financial status. This study explored parents' occupational/financial experiences post-treatment. Method: Semi-structured interviews were administered to seventy-eight parents (44 mothers) of childhood cancer survivors diagnosed in the preceding five years. Transcripts were organized into themes using QSR NVivo8. Results: Parents reported familial, psychological and practical factors affecting their ability to return to work. Prioritizing family, re-instigating career progression and negative workplace attitudes were particularly challenging. Conclusion: Parents of children with cancer experience substantial work-family conflict after their child's physical recovery from cancer. Family friendly policies and further research are recommended.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 07/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to investigate the predictors of benefit finding in 311 adult children of patients with cancer. Participants completed a comprehensive on-line/pen and paper survey measuring benefit finding, gender of parent, outcome and duration of illness, caregiving experience, and emotional experiences including reaction to diagnosis and grief and loss. Greater benefit finding was positively associated with stronger emotional experiences, satisfaction with the caregiving role, and outcome of parental cancer, explaining 15.3% of the variance in benefit finding. Higher emotional reactions and outcome of parental cancer as significant predictors of parental cancer provide some support for the applicability of theories of posttraumatic growth to this cohort.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Our study examined the relationships of biological and psychosocial predictors as contributing factors to the psychological functioning among breast cancer survivors. A sample of (N = 155) African American breast cancer survivors were recruited from California. A general linear model was utilized to examine the relationships. Biological and psychosocial risk factors were significant predictors for anxiety and depression. These predictors can be viewed as contributing factors to the psychological well-being of this cohort. Anxiety and depression are often under-recognized and subsequently under-treated in survivors. Understanding the predictors of depression and anxiety is necessary for incorporating a multidisciplinary approach to address this problem.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 07/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract The purpose of this study was to explore intimate relationships after a cancer diagnosis, applying Constructivist Grounded Theory to interviews with 55 Canadian young adult cancer survivors. The core category found was the dynamic interplay between participants' experiences of cancer and their intimate relationships. We found four themes within this core category; the mental experience of cancer, challenged sexual intimacy, the relationship response to strain (supportive or non-supportive), and adapted intimacy. This research demonstrates the importance of intimate relationships for young adults along their cancer trajectory, revealing that those relationships are severely strained by a cancer diagnosis and treatment, yet help to limit negative consequences.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT The intercorrelations among the 15 scales of the EORTC QLQ-C30 quality of life questionnaire suggest that one may combine (a) the physical functioning and role functioning scales, (b) the emotional functioning and cognitive functioning scales, and (c) the nine symptom scales. Together with the global health/quality of life scale and the social functioning scale, five measures remain. Principal component analysis of those five measures, using data from Japanese and Dutch breast and lung cancer patients, yielded two dimensions: 1. generalized health related quality of life, and 2. health-independent psychological well-being. The correlations of these dimensions with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and Karnofsky performance substantiated this interpretation.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aims of the study were to assess socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with suicidal ideation in patients with cancer who required a psycho-oncological support. Among 504 participants, there were 136 (23 men and 113 women) cancer patients who completed psychological assessment when admitted to the Psycho-oncology Outpatient Clinic between 2006 and 2011. Suicidal ideation was assessed by item n. 9 of the Brief Symptom Inventory, Hopelessness was assessed by the hopelessness subscale of the MINI-Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale, and Depression was assessed by the depression subscale of the Hospital and Anxiety Depression Scale. Around 30% of our sample reported affective symptoms and around 20% reported suicidal ideation and hopelessness. Patients who reported suicidal ideation were more hopeless (18.8±6.7 vs. 15.7±5.2; t134 = 2.54; P<0.05) and reported more depression (11.8 ±4.8 vs. 6.8±4.1; t134 = 5.30; P<0.001). It is evident that cancer can result in a strong psychological distress in the patient. It is important, therefore, that cancer patients receive a proper assistance and psychological support and that both the possible presence of depression and suicidal ideation are constantly monitored.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Lung cancer patients and their family caregivers face a wide range of potentially distressing symptoms across the four domains of quality of life. A multi-dimensional approach to addressing these complex concerns with early integration of palliative care has proven beneficial. This article highlights opportunities to integrate social work using a comprehensive quality of life model and a composite patient scenario from a large lung cancer educational intervention National Cancer Institute-funded program project grant.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background: Although the complexity of age combined with a cancer diagnosis raises many supportive care needs there are seldom resources to assess or address such needs for older people with cancer (OPWC). Aims: To trial a service to improve the care for OPWC through: -an expanded supportive care screening process -capacity building of sub-acute ambulatory care services (SACS) staff to increase referrals to community based rehabilitation Methods/design: Collaboration between allied health (AH) staff at an inner city general hospital with a large cancer service, a cancer specialist hospital and a SACS service in Melbourne, Australia developed an AH geriatric screening assessment (GSA) tool. Parallel to this process the training was provided to SACS staff in relation to working with OPWC. Results: While close to half (44%) of SACS staff who participated in this program (n = 22) had over 6 years' experience, 32% had not worked with OPWC. Prior to training, 81% did not feel confident in their knowledge about working with this cohort. While post training 72% were more confident about normal ageing and implications for care of OPWC. Of the 491patients screened, 80% were over the age of 65, however, only 25 resided in the SACS catchment area. Over a third of these did not have clear rehabilitation needs and the remainder were not referred due to ongoing medical issues. While less than half of the patients in the catchment area were discussed in a Multi-disciplinary Meeting (MDM) all were referred to allied health and assessed using the GSA. Conclusion: While this project did not result in referrals of OPWC to SACS the training program for SACS staff was a success and allied health assessments were improved to include GSA factors. The complexity of care for OPWC was further highlighted through interviews with staff involved with the study.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 05/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Posttraumatic growth has been demonstrated to occur following the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Some examples of positive changes in personal qualities and life perspectives may be that patients report improvement in interpersonal relationships, greater appreciation for life, greater personal strength, and enhanced spirituality. Still unknown is whether patients expect such growth, how growth is perceived at early points in time that follow the cancer experience, and whether patient reports of growth are corroborated by others. Participants were 87 patients and 55 collaterals (e.g., spouses, family members) who reported their anticipation of growth pretreatment and their perceived growth at a nine-month follow-up. Collaterals reported their anticipation of growth both for themselves and for patients. Patients and collaterals expected high levels of personal growth; patients' expectations for their own growth were significantly higher than collaterals' expectations for theirs. When anticipated growth was compared to later reported growth, patients overanticipated growth across all domains (i.e., experienced less growth than expected) and collaterals underanticipated growth. Collaterals correctly anticipated the areas in which patients would experience personal growth; the most accurate predictions were for the domains of spiritual change and personal strengths. Cancer patients and collaterals anticipate personal growth from the cancer experience. Results of the current study provide evidence for anticipating growth as a possible important precursor for later reported growth and thus illustrate the importance of understanding the experience of patients' spouses and families.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Helplines are core feature of the contemporary UK healthcare system, however little is known about callers' experiences of seeking cancer-related telephone help. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 32 cancer helpline callers. The findings suggest cancer helplines offer callers (1) time to discuss their issues; (2) anonymity; (3) convenience; and (4) an open outlet for anyone affected by cancer including family/friends. Further, the findings highlighted that callers' help-seeking behaviour was multi-faceted, with their psychosocial needs being intrinsically intertwined with their information or advice-seeking needs. The implications are discussed in relation to the role of cancer helplines in the healthcare system.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 03/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Most studies of the psychosocial needs of patients with head and neck cancers' (HNC) use predefined categories and explicitly ask for specified needs. These studies are important but should be complemented with inductive studies based on patients' own descriptions of experiences. The present qualitative study is such a contribution. In repeated interviews positive and negative incidents were collected from 137 patients with HNC, and these experiences were categorized in dimensions expressing needs. A core category-'being included-neglected by a helping system'-emerged from the narrated incidents and it was based on the dimensions 'engagement', 'competence' and 'information'. The findings are easily related to attachment-theory by stressing the significance of establishing trustful relationships with the health care staff, as attachment figures, who respond flexibly and sensitively to the patient's needs. In the constitution of health care as a helping system, all encounters between the patient and health care staff matters. Further research should preferably focus on the creation of guidelines for the constitution of health care as a helping system, i.e. how the found factors of a helping system can be operationalized in clinical practice.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT This study assessed the biopsychosocial impact of Veteran older adult cancer survivors by garnering their accounts of their illness experiences. A narrative analysis of 73 cancer diagnosis and treatment stories reveals five "paths" Veterans are taking 18 months post-diagnosis. These paths indicate that cancer survivorship cannot be conceptualized as a one size fits all experience, but rather is a process of Veterans understanding and making sense of the effects of cancer on their lives. Our future goal is to develop a screening tool to help clinicians identify a patient's "path" in order to tailor survivorship care to meet specific needs.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT This study examines the process of dyadic coping among couples who are managing stress related to a partner's breast cancer diagnosis and identifies cultural factors that impact how couples cope together. Utilizing a qualitative method based on relational psychologies, the "Listening Guide," we analyzed the narratives of 28 couples who where coping with early-stage breast cancer and lived in Hong Kong-China, India, and the United States. Our analysis revealed four cultural factors influencing the process of coping with breast cancer. These factors included: 1) family boundaries, 2) gender roles, 3) personal control, and 4) interdependence. Some couples were able to transcend prevailing cultural norms to re-establish balance in their lives and adapt to the cancer. Implications for using couple-based interventions with cancer patients in differing cultural contexts are discussed.
    Journal of Psychosocial Oncology 03/2014;