Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education (Biochem Mol Biol Educ )

Publisher: International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, John Wiley and Sons

Description

Title discontinued as of 2002. Formerly known as Biochemical Education

  • Impact factor
    0.70
  • 5-year impact
    0.59
  • Cited half-life
    6.10
  • Immediacy index
    0.03
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.22
  • Website
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education website
  • Other titles
    Biochemistry and molecular biology education (Online), Biochemistry and molecular biology education, BAMBEd
  • ISSN
    1539-3429
  • OCLC
    45409187
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

John Wiley and Sons

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • On personal web site or secure external website at authors institution
    • Deposit in institutional repositories is not allowed
    • JASIST authors may deposit in an institutional repository
    • Non-commercial
    • Pre-print must be accompanied with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'John Wiley and Sons' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a standard clinical biochemistry exercise. The students are not only exposed to techniques and equipment but are also inspired to think more about the biochemical mechanisms of diseases. When linked with lecture topics about the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids, the students obtain a better understanding of the relevance of abnormal metabolism in relation to diseases. Such understanding provides a solid foundation for the medical students' future research and for other clinical applications. © 2014 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2014.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Increasing student participation in science is an ongoing challenge for many universities. In this active learning workshop, centered on inquiry and teamwork, we introduce high-school students to biochemistry and molecular biology techniques using a murder mystery activity. During this intensive 3 hr workshop, we engage students in a murder scenario entitled "The Case of the Silenced Scientist." A commercially available DNA fingerprinting kit was used as a basis to create a customized scenario whereby students collaborate with one another to solve a murder mystery. Through analysis of DNA samples taken from the crime scene and suspects, students can identify the murderer while developing technical, teamwork, and critical thinking skills. Emphasis is placed on teamwork by immersing students in the collaborative process of research inquiry. Though short in duration, this workshop aims to build student relationships to science through creativity and exploration. In this article, we describe the key customized applications of this workshop as a blueprint for science recruitment. We focus on the workshop facilitators' perceived learning impact on students. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2014.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Topics on the molecular basis underlying cancer are quite popular among students. Also, excellent textbooks abound that provide interesting materials for discussion during lectures and tutorials about major events leading to cancer formation and progression. However, much less is available for students to conduct experiments for the analysis of cancer samples in undergraduate modules where there is a limited time-frame. Given the difficulty of working with cancer samples and the scarcity of good samples even in the clinical laboratories, it is impossible to run large-class practicals using patients' samples. Here, we describe the use of tissue slides in combination with polymerase-chain reaction (PCR) as a means of simulating an investigative approach to supplement students' learning of clinical research. By using tissue slides for histo-pathogical examinations and specific budding yeast genomic DNA and primers adapted to demonstrate methylation-specific PCR, we designed an inquiry-based lab session to simulate the clinical investigation of a cohort of biopsies that students could analyze in a one-session practical. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2014.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The use of internet-based technologies in the teaching of laboratories has emerged as a promising education tool. This study evaluated the effectiveness of using remote access technology to operate an atomic absorption spectrophotometer in analyzing the iron content in a crude myoglobin extract. Sixty-two students were surveyed on their level of engagement, learning, and overall experience. Feedback from students suggests that the use of remote access technology is effective in teaching students the principles of chemical analysis by atomic absorption spectroscopy. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2014.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A two-part laboratory exercise was developed to enhance classroom instruction on the significance of p53 mutations in cancer development. Students were asked to mine key information from an international database of p53 genetic changes related to cancer, the IARC TP53 database. Using this database, students designed several data mining activities to look at the changes in the p53 gene from a number of perspectives, including potential cancer-causing agents leading to particular changes and the prevalence of certain p53 variations in certain cancers. In addition, students gained a global perspective on cancer prevalence in different parts of the world. Students learned how to use the database in the first part of the exercise, and then used that knowledge to search particular cancers and cancer-causing agents of their choosing in the second part of the exercise. Students also connected the information gathered from the p53 exercise to a previous laboratory exercise looking at risk factors for cancer development. The goal of the experience was to increase student knowledge of the link between p53 genetic variation and cancer. Students also were able to walk a similar path through the website as a cancer researcher using the database to enhance bench work-based experiments with complementary large-scale database p53 variation information. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2014.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2014.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 11/2014;
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gel filtration chromatography (GFC) separates molecules according to size and is one of the most widely used methods for protein purification. Here, red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), and/or their fusion proteins were prokaryotically expressed, purified, and used in a laboratory exercise to intuitively demonstrate GFC. Different bands, corresponding to RFP, RFP-CFP (RC), YFP-RFP-YFP (YRY), and pyruvate kinase II-GFP (PKG) were well separated on a Superdex 200 column from a 0.5-mL sample. Increasing the sample volume and changing the chromatographic resin to Sephadex G-100 resulted in lower resolution separation. Students enjoyed identifying combinations of colored proteins and found this exercise helpful for understanding the factors that affect GFC resolution. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2014.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry Knowledge Assessment (GOB-CKA) is a multiple-choice instrument designed to assess students' understanding of the chemistry topics deemed important to clinical nursing practice. This manuscript describes the development process of the individual items along with a psychometric evaluation of the final version of the items and instrument. In developing items for the GOB-CKA, essential topics were identified through a series of expert interviews (with practicing nurses, nurse educators, and GOB chemistry instructors) and confirmed through a national survey. Individual items were tested in qualitative studies with students from the target population for clarity and wording. Data from pilot and beta studies were used to evaluate each item and narrow the total item count to 45. A psychometric analysis performed on data from the 45-item final version was used to provide evidence of validity and reliability. The final version of the instrument has a Cronbach's alpha value of 0.76. Feedback from an expert panel provided evidence of face and content validity. Convergent validity was estimated by comparing the results from the GOB-CKA with the General-Organic-Biochemistry Exam (Form 2007) of the American Chemical Society. Instructors who wish to use the GOB-CKA for teaching and research may contact the corresponding author for a copy of the instrument. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2014.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 11/2014;
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This historical note reviews the work that resulted in the publication of the structure of Vitamin B12. The collaborations and resulting friendships that developed during this time made a strong impression on the author and encouraged her to pursue a scientific career. 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2014.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of “Hangman.” Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying structures, hints to the answers were written in “amino acid sentences” for the students to translate. Students were required to draw the structure of the corresponding letter they wished to guess on a whiteboard. Each student received a reference sheet of the structures and abbreviations, but was required to draw from memory when guessing a letter. Preassessments and postassessments revealed a drastic improvement in the students' ability to recognize and draw structures from memory. This activity provides a fun, educational game to play in biochemistry discussion sections or during long incubations in biochemistry laboratories. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2014.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bacterial viruses, otherwise known as bacteriophage (or phage), are some of the most abundant viruses found in the environment. They can be easily isolated from water or soil and are ideal for use in laboratory classrooms due to their ease of culture and inherent safety. Here, we describe a series of 10 laboratory exercises where students collect, isolate, and purify the genome of an environmental phage. Once the genome has been extracted, students then clone a fragment of their isolated phage genome into a plasmid and analyze its sequence to identify the phage in their original isolate. These exercises have been carefully designed to apply foundational concepts that will expose students to basic skills in microbiology, molecular biology, and bioinformatics. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2014.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 10/2014;
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This adaptable graduate laboratory course on protein purification offers students the opportunity to explore a wide range of techniques while allowing the instructor the freedom to incorporate their own personal research interests. The course design involves two sequential purification schemes performed in a single semester. The first part comprises the expression and purification of a recombinant GFP-binding protein from E. coli. The student-purified GFP-binding protein is then used in the second part of the course to immunoprecipitate GFP-tagged proteins, and their potential interacting partners, from cell or tissue extracts. As an example, we describe the immunoprecipitation of GFP-tagged proteins from Drosophila melanogaster larval extracts that are homologous to proteins implicated in human diseases, followed by western blotting to examine student experimental outcomes. However, the widespread availability of GFP-fusion proteins in diverse organisms enables researchers to tailor the second part of the course to their specific research programs while maintaining the flexibility to engage students in active learning. Student evaluations indicate a genuine excitement for research and in depth knowledge of both the techniques performed and the theory behind them. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2014.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An interactive chart of energy metabolism with didactic function, complementary to the already existing metabolic maps, located at the URL www.metpath.teithe.gr is being presented. The chart illustrates the major catabolic and biosynthetic pathways of glucose, fatty acids, and aminoacids, individually as well as in an integrated view. For every metabolite and reaction an information sheet may be presented at the side of the map as fancybox, containing chemical structural formulae, an external link to the KEGG database and links that lead to the reactions at which the produced metabolites may participate as reactants. The latter allows the user to navigate through metabolic reactions following a route similar to the metabolic flow of substances, while keeping track of the occurring chemical transformations. Simultaneously, users may observe how they move across the metabolic map, possibly along different pathways, thus enhancing the user's integrated perception of metabolism. The site has already been introduced in biochemistry lectures and the students evaluated it. Most students were helped a lot or more to understand individual pathways as well as their interconnections and they also found it pleasant and easy to navigate. The vast majority of the students considered its use in the classroom desired. The chart currently may be displayed in English and in Greek while more languages can be integrated in the future. The authors' view, in accordance to the users' perception, is that the presented site may offer biochemistry tutors and students a useful teaching aid. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2014.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 09/2014;