Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education (Biochem Mol Biol Educ)

Publisher: International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Wiley

Journal description

Title discontinued as of 2002. Formerly known as Biochemical Education

Current impact factor: 0.59

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 0.593
2012 Impact Factor 0.702
2011 Impact Factor 0.84
2010 Impact Factor 0.619
2009 Impact Factor 0.292
2008 Impact Factor 0.635
2007 Impact Factor 0.504
2006 Impact Factor 0.368
2005 Impact Factor 0.646
2004 Impact Factor 0.513
2003 Impact Factor 0.637
2002 Impact Factor 0.409
2001 Impact Factor 0.3

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.59
Cited half-life 6.10
Immediacy index 0.03
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.22
Website Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education website
Other titles Biochemistry and molecular biology education (Online), Biochemistry and molecular biology education, BAMBEd
ISSN 1539-3429
OCLC 45409187
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo for scientific, technical and medicine titles
    • 2 years embargo for humanities and social science titles
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • On author's personal website, institutional repositories, arXiv, AgEcon, PhilPapers, PubMed Central, RePEc or Social Science Research Network
    • Author's pre-print may not be updated with Publisher's Version/PDF
    • Author's pre-print must acknowledge acceptance for publication
    • On a non-profit server
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher source must be acknowledged with citation
    • Must link to publisher version with set statement (see policy)
    • If OnlineOpen is available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • If OnlineOpen is not available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 6 months
    • If OnlineOpen is available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 24 months
    • If OnlineOpen is not available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • Reviewed 18/03/14
    • Please see former John Wiley & Sons and Blackwell Publishing policies for articles published prior to February 2007
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Enzyme-substrate interactions are a fundamental concept of biochemistry that is built upon throughout multiple biochemistry courses. Central to understanding enzyme-substrate interactions is specific knowledge of exactly how an enzyme and substrate interact. Within this narrower topic, students must understand the various binding sites on an enzyme and be able to reason from simplistic lock and key or induced fit models to the more complex energetics model of transition state theory. Learning to understand these many facets of enzyme-substrate interactions and reasoning from multiple models present challenges where students incorrectly make connections between concepts or make no connection at all. This study investigated biochemistry students' understanding of enzyme-substrate interactions through the use of clinical interviews and a national administration (N = 707) of the Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory. Findings include misconceptions regarding the nature of enzyme-substrate interactions, naïve ideas about the active site, a lack of energetically driven interactions, and an incomplete understanding of the specificity pocket. © 2015 by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 04/2015; DOI:10.1002/bmb.20868
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Teaching the subject of the electron transport chain is one of the most challenging aspects of the chemistry curriculum at the high school level. This article presents an educational program called "Electron Transport Chain" which consists of 14 visual animations including a biochemistry quiz. The program was created in the Adobe Flash CS3 Professional animation program and is designed for high school chemistry students. Our goal is to develop educational materials that facilitate the comprehension of this complex subject through dynamic animations which show the course of the electron transport chain and simultaneously explain its nature. We record the process of the electron transport chain, including connections with oxidative phosphorylation, in such a way as to minimize the occurrence of discrepancies in interpretation. The educational program was evaluated in high schools through the administration of a questionnaire, which contained 12 opened-ended items and which required participants to evaluate the graphics of the animations, chemical content, student preferences, and its suitability for high school biochemistry teaching. © 2015 by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 04/2015; DOI:10.1002/bmb.20867
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 03/2015; DOI:10.1002/bmb.20864
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Division of Graduate Medical Sciences at the Boston University School of Medicine houses numerous dynamic graduate programs. Doctoral students began their studies with laboratory rotations and classroom training in a variety of fundamental disciplines. Importantly, with 15 unique pathways of admission to these doctoral programs, there were also 15 unique curricula. Departments and programs offered courses independently, and students participated in curricula that were overlapping combinations of these courses. This system created curricula that were not coordinated and that had redundant course content as well as content gaps. A partnership of key stakeholders began a curriculum reform process to completely restructure doctoral education at the Boston University School of Medicine. The key pedagogical goals, objectives, and elements designed into the new curriculum through this reform process created a curriculum designed to foster the interdisciplinary thinking that students are ultimately asked to utilize in their research endeavors. We implemented comprehensive student and peer evaluation of the new Foundations in Biomedical Sciences integrated curriculum to assess the new curriculum. Furthermore, we detail how this process served as a gateway toward creating a more fully integrated graduate experience, under the umbrella of the Program in Biomedical Sciences. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 03/2015; DOI:10.1002/bmb.20862
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In traditional introductory biochemistry laboratory classes students learn techniques for protein purification and analysis by following provided, established, step-by-step procedures. Students are exposed to a variety of biochemical techniques but are often not developing procedures or collecting new, original data. In this laboratory module, students develop research skills through work on an original research project and gain confidence in their ability to design and execute an experiment while faculty can enhance their scholarly pursuits through the acquisition of original data in the classroom laboratory. Students are prepared for a 6-8 week discovery-driven project on the purification of the Escherichia coli cytidylate kinase (CMP kinase) through in class problems and other laboratory exercises on bioinformatics and protein structure analysis. After a minimal amount of guidance on how to perform the CMP kinase in vitro enzyme assay, SDS-PAGE, and the basics of protein purification, students, working in groups of three to four, develop a protein purification protocol based on the scientific literature and investigate some aspect of CMP kinase that interests them. Through this process, students learn how to implement a new but perhaps previously worked out procedure to answer their research question. In addition, they learn the importance of keeping a clear and thorough laboratory notebook and how to interpret their data and use that data to inform the next set of experiments. Following this module, students had increased confidence in their ability to do basic biochemistry techniques and reported that the "self-directed" nature of this lab increased their engagement in the project. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 03/2015; DOI:10.1002/bmb.20844
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recently, a requirement for directed responsible conduct in research (RCR) education has become a priority in the United States and elsewhere. In the US, both the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation require RCR education for all students who are financially supported by federal awards. The guidelines produced by these agencies offer useful templates for the introduction of RCR materials into courses worldwide. Many academic programs already offer courses or workshops in RCR for their graduate students and for undergraduate science majors and/or researchers. Introducing RCR into undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory curricula is another, highly practical way that students can be exposed to these important topics. In fact, a strong argument can be made for integrating RCR into laboratory courses because these classes often introduce students to a scientific environment like that they might encounter in their careers after graduation. This article focuses on general strategies for incorporating explicit RCR education into biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory coursework using the topics suggested by NIH as a starting point. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 02/2015; DOI:10.1002/bmb.20857
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Novel possibilities for employing genetic testing as part of the diagnostic process for a wide variety of diseases and conditions are emerging almost every day. This development brings prospects of more efficient treatment and prevention of serious and often lethal conditions. However, it also raises ethical questions concerning the issue of knowing or not knowing about our genetic make-up. Thus, as techniques for genetic testing are increasingly employed, demands on health professionals are changing. Health professionals must be able to inform and guide patients, and therefore they need knowledge and competencies related to both the technical and the ethical dimensions of genetic testing. This paper explores the requirements of the general education of health professionals if this need for ethics is acknowledged. It is suggested that it is important to include both an individualised and a societal ethical perspective to the development of genomic healthcare and that a key concept in doing so is 'professional reflectivity'. Employing one concrete example of teaching, this concept of reflectivity is operationalised in the health educational setting at the bachelor's level with a special focus on biomedical laboratory science, and three key concepts are developed: Gap sensitive interaction, professional humility, and contextual awareness. Additionally, anchored ethical dialog is explored as an instructional design that may support the development of reflectivity among health professionals. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 02/2015; DOI:10.1002/bmb.20859
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article advances the prerequisite network as a means to visualize the hidden structure in an academic curriculum. Networks have been used to represent a variety of complex systems ranging from social systems to biochemical pathways and protein interactions. Here, I treat the academic curriculum as a complex system with nodes representing courses and links between nodes the course prerequisites as readily obtained from a course catalogue. I show that the catalogue data can be rendered as a directed acyclic graph, which has certain desirable analytical features. Using metrics developed in mathematical graph theory, I characterize the overall structure of the undergraduate curriculum of Benedictine University along with that of its Biochemistry and Molecular Biology program. The latter program is shown to contain hidden community structure that crosses disciplinary boundaries. The overall curriculum is seen as partitioned into numerous isolated course groupings, the size of the groups varying considerably. Individual courses serve different roles in the organization, such as information sources, hubs, and bridges. The curriculum prerequisite network represents the intrinsic, hard-wired constraints on the flow of information in a curriculum, and is the organizational context within which learning occurs. I explore some applications for advising and curriculum reform. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 02/2015; DOI:10.1002/bmb.20861
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Incorporating scientific literacy into inquiry driven research is one of the most effective mechanisms for developing an undergraduate student's strength in writing. Additionally, discovery-based laboratories help develop students who approach science as critical thinkers. Thus, a three-week laboratory module for an introductory cell and molecular biology course that couples inquiry-based experimental design with extensive scientific writing was designed at Westminster College to expose first year students to these concepts early in their undergraduate career. In the module students used scientific literature to design and then implement an experiment on the effect of cellular stress on protein expression in HeLa cells. In parallel the students developed a research paper in the style of the undergraduate journal BIOS to report their results. HeLa cells were used to integrate the research experience with the Westminster College "Next Chapter" first year program, in which the students explored the historical relevance of HeLa cells from a sociological perspective through reading The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. In this report I detail the design, delivery, student learning outcomes, and assessment of this module, and while this exercise was designed for an introductory course at a small primarily undergraduate institution, suggestions for modifications at larger universities or for upper division courses are included. Finally, based on student outcomes suggestions are provided for improving the module to enhance the link between teaching students skills in experimental design and execution with developing student skills in information literacy and writing. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 02/2015; DOI:10.1002/bmb.20852
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The TAS2R38 alleles that code for the PAV/AVI T2R38 proteins have long been viewed as benign taste receptor variants. However, recent studies have demonstrated an expanding and medically relevant role for TAS2R38. The AVI variant of T2R38 is associated with an increased risk of both colorectal cancer and Pseudomonas aeruginosa-associated sinus infection and T2R38 variants have been implicated in off-target drug responses. To address ethical concerns associated with continued student TAS2R38 gene testing, we developed an alternative to the traditional laboratory genotyping exercise. Instead of determining their own genotype, introductory level students isolated plasmid DNA containing a section of the human TAS2R38 gene from Escherichia coli. Following PCR-mediated amplification of a section of the TAS2R38 gene spanning the SNP at position 785, students determined their assigned genotype by restriction enzyme digestion and agarose gel electrophoresis. Using the course wide genotype and phenotype data, students found that there was an association between TAS2R38 genotype and the age of persistent P. aeruginosa acquisition in cystic fibrosis "patients." Assessment data demonstrated that students taking part in this new TAS2R38 laboratory activity made clear learning gains. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 02/2015; 43(2). DOI:10.1002/bmb.20846
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A three-day ethics seminar introduced ethics to undergraduate environmental chemistry students in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. The seminar helped students become sensitive to and understand the ethical and values dimensions of their work as researchers. It utilized a variety of resources to supplement lectures and class discussion on a variety of issues. Students learned about the relevance of ethics to research, skills in moral reasoning, and the array of ethical issues facing various aspects of scientific research. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 02/2015; DOI:10.1002/bmb.20856
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To lead positive change in the teaching practice of teams that service large numbers of diverse students from multiple degree programs provides many challenges. The primary aim of this study was to provide a clear framework on which to plan the process of change that can be utilized by academic departments sector wide. Barriers to change were reduced by adapting and utilizing Kotter's principals of change specifically by creating a sense of urgency and defining a clear goal designed to address the problem. Changing attitudes involved training staff in new teaching and learning approaches and strategies, and creating a collaborative, supportive team-based teaching environment within which the planned changes could be implemented and evaluated. As a result senior academics are now directly involved in delivering sections of the face-to-face teaching in the new environment. Through promoting positive change we enabled deeper student engagement with the theoretical concepts delivered in lectures as evidenced by favorable student evaluations, feedback, and improved final exam results. A collaborative team-based approach that recognizes the importance of distributed leadership combined with a clearly articulated change management process were central to enabling academics to design, try, and evaluate the new teaching and learning practices. Our study demonstrates that a concerted focus on "change management" enabled teaching team members to adopt a major shift in the teaching and learning approach that resulted in measurable improvements in student learning. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 43(2):88-99, 2015. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 02/2015; 43(2). DOI:10.1002/bmb.20851
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    ABSTRACT: The Rossmann fold is one of the most common and widely distributed super-secondary structures. It is composed of a series of alternating beta strand (β) and alpha helical (α) segments wherein the β-strands are hydrogen bonded forming a β-sheet. The initial beta-alpha-beta (βαβ) fold is the most conserved segment of Rossmann folds. As this segment is in contact with the ADP portion of dinucleotides such as FAD, NAD, and NADP it is also called as an "ADP-binding βαβ fold". The Proteopedia entry on the Rossmann fold (Available at: http://proteopedia.org/w/Rossmann_fold) was generated to illustrate several structural aspects of super families of FAD and NAD(P) binding proteins: (1) The coenzymes FAD and NAD(P) share the basic adenosine diphosphate (ADP) structure. (2) The βαβ fold motif that is common to both FAD and NAD(P) binding enzymes accommodates the common ADP component of these two coenzymes. (3) In both FAD and NAD(P) binding sites, the tight turn between the first β-strand and the α-helix is in contact with the two phosphate groups of ADP. (4) This hairpin curve includes the first two conserved glycines (Gly-x-Gly) that allow the sharp turn of the polypeptide backbone. (5) The two β-strands of the βαβ fold may constitute the core of a larger β-sheet that may include up to seven β-strands generally in parallel orientation. (6) The structures of segments between additional strands vary greatly and may be composed of a variety of structures such as multiple short helices or coils. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 02/2015; DOI:10.1002/bmb.20849
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 02/2015; DOI:10.1002/bmb.20850
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    ABSTRACT: We have developed a multiweek laboratory project in which students isolate myoglobin and characterize its structure, function, and redox state. The important laboratory techniques covered in this project include size-exclusion chromatography, electrophoresis, spectrophotometric titration, and FTIR spectroscopy. Regarding protein structure, students work with computer modeling and visualization of myoglobin and its homologues, after which they spectroscopically characterize its thermal denaturation. Students also study protein function (ligand binding equilibrium) and are instructed on topics in data analysis (calibration curves, nonlinear vs. linear regression). This upper division biochemistry laboratory project is a challenging and rewarding one that not only exposes students to a wide variety of important biochemical laboratory techniques but also ties those techniques together to work with a single readily available and easily characterized protein, myoglobin. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education 02/2015; DOI:10.1002/bmb.20845