Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society

Publisher: Infusion Nurses Society, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

Description

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Other titles
    Journal of infusion nursing (Online), Infusion nursing
  • ISSN
    1539-0667
  • OCLC
    48272706
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • Pre-print must be removed upon acceptance for publication
    • Post-print may be deposited in personal website, university's institutional repository or employers intranet
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must include statement that it is not the final published version
    • Published source must be acknowledged with full citation
    • Must link to publisher version
    • NIH, Wellcome Trust and HHMI authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf (see policy for details)
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Infants and children are typically undertreated for pain. Many treatment options are available to prevent and diminish the pain experienced by children during venipuncture. Infusion nurses must employ pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment options to make the experience more positive for the child, the family, and the nurse. These treatment options are explored in this article.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 03/2013; 36(2):98-106.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: All health care providers, and particularly nurses who are on the front lines of patient care, must be skilled in providing culturally appropriate and competent care. Cultural competence needs to be guided by a philosophical framework. This article was written to describe cultural care in the context of home infusion nursing using the Process of Cultural Competence in the Delivery of Healthcare Services model. The model is used to provide structural reference in order to offer nursing care to members of diverse cultures. The 5-part model gives an overarching conceptual orientation to assist the nurse in providing quality care that is culturally sensitive.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 03/2013; 36(2):108-114.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Inappropriate intravenous fluid therapy results in increased patient morbidity and mortality. By far the most common fluid and electrolyte problems that confront both chronically and critically ill patients are disturbances in sodium and water balance. Thus, it is important for the infusion therapy nurse to understand the basic pathophysiology of sodium imbalances as well as therapeutic approaches for their correction. Adding to this need is the recognition that, in hospital settings, disorders of sodium and water balance are often iatrogenic.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 03/2013; 36(2):126-130.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sepsis is a major cause of patient morbidity and mortality. Many critically ill patients are septic, and red blood cell transfusion is often part of their treatment plan. Studies have shown that red blood cell transfusion is associated with a dose-dependent increase in patient morbidity and mortality. Although red blood cells are transfused to increase the recipient's oxygen-carrying capacity, there are new and emerging data to support that red blood cell transfusion may potentially decrease perfusion and oxygen delivery to the microcirculation, particularly when older red blood cells are transfused. In addition, there are similar effects in the pathophysiology of sepsis that may overlap with the changes that occur with storage of red blood cells. This article will discuss recent literature addressing red cell transfusion in critically ill and septic patients and discuss general guidelines for red cell transfusion in this patient population. This article will also discuss the epidemiology and pathophysiology of sepsis and relate how storage and transfusion of red cells may potentially contribute to changes observed in a septic patient.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 03/2013; 36(2):116-121.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Waste is blood drawn from an intravenous (IV) catheter to remove saline or heparin before obtaining a blood sample. This study examines the minimum waste volume resulting in an undiluted sample. A repeated-measures design was used. Investigators placed an IV catheter in 60 healthy adults and obtained samples at baseline and following waste volumes ranging from 0.5 to 3 mL. A random effects mixed model was used to determine the stabilizing point, which was 1 mL of waste. Knowing that only 1 mL of waste is needed will prevent clinicians from obtaining extra waste and discarding blood needlessly.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 03/2013; 36(2):92-96.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Trace elements are important nutrients for the critically ill patient. These minerals are routinely included in enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition regimens. There are 5 individual trace elements (chromium, copper, manganese, selenium, and zinc) that are available for intravenous use as separate infusions when necessary based on a thorough clinical assessment. Intravenous administration of trace elements will improve measured biomarkers and may also improve patient outcome. The selected regimen for each trace element is based on the patient presentation and the available evidence.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 01/2013; 36(1):16-23.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Extravasation of medications during peripheral intravenous (PIV) therapy can result in harm to pediatric patients. These medications have physical and/or biologic factors that cause tissue damage. To assist in clinical decisions when using these infusates, an evidence-based table of medications stratified by their relative risk of causing harm if extravasated was developed. Local data and experience, a systematic review of the pediatric literature, and measured pH and osmolality of common pediatric preparations of PIV infusates were used to create a 3-tiered table of PIV infusates categorized by relative risk of causing harm if extravasated.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 01/2013; 36(1):37-45.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Immunoglobulin (Ig) replacement therapy, given as regular infusions of pooled human Ig, is the recognized treatment of humoral immunodeficiencies characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and impaired antibody responses. It is a safe, effective therapy when delivered by nurses who have been educated to oversee and/or provide these infusions. Guidelines for administration have been developed by the Immune Deficiency Foundation Nurse Advisory Committee to provide a framework and guidance to those nurses administering this therapy.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 01/2013; 36(1):58-68.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Obese patients are a highly specialized population to manage within the health care system. Excess weight contributes to changes in patients' anatomy and physiology. Specialized equipment, including vascular access devices, is required to accommodate their needs. Research has shown that traditional methods of obtaining vascular access can prove unfruitful in the obese patient population. Choosing the most appropriate device in conjunction with practicing the most effective technique will improve vascular access outcomes for obese patients.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 01/2013; 36(1):52-6.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Converting a traditional intravenous (IV) team to a vascular resource team improves patient outcomes by empowering nurses to implement an evidence-based practice model of care. This model encourages staff nurses to learn comprehensive vascular care through education and training regarding access devices and IV therapy. Vascular resource nurses teach bedside nurses regarding best practice care for patients with complex vascular needs. This allows bedside nurses to become confident and competent in their vascular skills and knowledge. These improvements can lead to decreased catheter-related bloodstream infection rates and increased patient satisfaction scores. This article identifies best practices implemented in establishing and maintaining an effective vascular resource team.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 01/2013; 36(1):46-50.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vascular air embolism as a medically induced complication may be associated with numerous treatments and therapies. In infusion therapy, the risk is associated with venous and arterial catheterization as well as various other invasive procedures and much of the equipment used for them. The manner of air entry and the presentation of symptoms may vary greatly. Appropriate treatment options are dependent on air entry routes. Nurses need to be aware of the common and seldom-considered causes of air embolism to be able to guard against this complication, yet adequately support the patient if it occurs.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 01/2013; 36(1):26-36.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The unintended intravenous infusion of small volumes of air is common in clinical practice. International Electrotechnical Commission guidelines for infusion pumps permit infusion of up to 1 mL in 15 minutes and discount bubbles smaller than 50 μL. A review of the literature, however, suggests that these limits may be too generous. Neonates and patients with right-to-left cardiac shunts (eg, patent foramen ovale [PFO]) are at risk from lower volumes. Because PFO is prevalent in 20% to 27% of healthy adults and generally asymptomatic, all patients are at risk from small air bubbles, although clinically significant air embolism from intravenous infusion is rare. Attention to good clinical practice and use of an inline air filter should be considered to reduce any risk.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 11/2012; 35(6):404-408.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of practice and intravenous (IV) therapy product changes on central line infections (CLIs) and needlestick injuries. Data were collected in 2009 and 2010 for 1 year before and after implementation of practice and product changes. Statistical significance was noted when comparing CLIs before and after implementation of an antimicrobial IV connector. The number of needlestick injuries also decreased by 12% during this time. Study results support ongoing clinical practice monitoring and education as well as the use of a luer-activated IV therapy system and an antimicrobial IV connector.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 11/2012; 35(6):370-375.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ketamine is a well-described anesthetic and analgesic, unique in its ability to preserve laryngeal reflexes and airway protection, and offered to a wide range of patients, although not necessarily widely used. Because it is considered an anesthetic, widespread use by all sedation providers is often limited despite its long history as a safe sedative. Because of its sympathomimetic effects, ketamine may be used in patients who are hypovolemic, including those who are experiencing traumatic or obstetric emergencies. The use of ketamine in patients with epilepsy or traumatic brain injury is more controversial. This article will explore the side effects of ketamine and current research that support or discourage its use in a variety of settings.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 11/2012; 35(6):377-382.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Infusion therapy is among the most common health care interventions, with approximately 90% of hospitalized patients receiving vascular access and an estimated 1.3 million home infusion therapies delivered annually. Whereas most individuals complete their therapy uneventfully, others experience alterations in skin integrity, some significant enough to disrupt therapy. There are limited published data on the incidence of skin damage associated with infusion therapy, and the etiology of damage has not been previously described in detail. Wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC) nurses have developed a significant understanding of skin-related problems and effective prevention strategies from over 40 years of experience with ostomy patients-another population in which adhesive wear is a constant and localized, superficial skin damage is common. This article will offer a WOC nursing perspective of skin damage and seek to provide a context for understanding and preventing skin damage in the infusion therapy patient.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 11/2012; 35(6):390-401.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Reducing health care costs without adversely affecting patient safety is a constant challenge for health care institutions. Cefazolin prophylaxis via intravenous push (IVP) is more cost-effective than via intravenous piggyback (IVPB). The purpose of this study was to determine whether patient safety would be compromised (ie, an increased rate of phlebitis) with a change to the IVP method. Rates of phlebitis in orthopedic surgical patients receiving cefazolin prophylaxis via IVP versus IVPB were evaluated in a prospective quasi-experimental design of 240 patients. The first 120 subjects received cefazolin via IVPB, and the second 120 subjects received it via IVP. Results indicated no statistically significant difference in phlebitis rates in the IVPB (3.4%) versus the IVP groups (3.3%).
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 11/2012; 35(6):384-388.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Medication errors, particularly intravenous therapy-related errors, still continue to occur, despite implementing newer technologies such as "smart pumps" to help avoid causing harm to patients. The Institute of Medicine report To Err Is Human, published in 1999, brought the problem of medication safety into the spotlight with a focus on improving the drug delivery systems of parenteral medications. The objective is to use this knowledge to help reduce errors, thereby promoting the best possible result for patients-no harm. Achieving this goal is not out of our reach, and with the execution of various point-of-care medication delivery systems, we are on the way to a safer practice.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 11/2012; 35(6):364-8.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nurses endure daily low-level exposure to cytotoxic drugs, which can lead to significant absorption with potential harmful consequences. New sterile medical devices called cytotoxic safe infusion systems (CSISs), intended by their manufacturers to improve safety and quality of cytotoxic drug infusions, have been made commercially available. CSISs from 3 manufacturers were tested in 2 cancer units and compared with standard infusion sets. The aim of this study is to evaluate the devices regarding occupational exposure, quality of the infusion, and economic aspects.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 09/2012; 35(5):321-327.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although guidelines for protecting health care workers from the dangers of hazardous drugs have been in existence for more than 25 years, there is tremendous inconsistency in compliance by oncology professionals. One reason for the discrepancy is the voluntary, nonpunitive nature of these guidelines. In 2012, Washington State became the first in the United States to mandate and enforce the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health guidelines.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 09/2012; 35(5):316-319.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Biologic therapy includes a diverse group of drugs that act directly on the immune system. Sometimes referred to as "targeted therapy," the biologics include cytokines and monoclonal antibodies. These agents can be genetically engineered versions of naturally occurring substances, or novel compounds used for the treatment of cancer and for nononcology diagnoses. This article provides information on the general types of biotherapy, an overview of how these drugs interact within the body, specific side effects, and nursing management.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 09/2012; 35(5):301-313.

Related Journals