Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society

Publisher: Infusion Nurses Society, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

Description

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
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  • Other titles
    Journal of infusion nursing (Online), Infusion nursing
  • ISSN
    1539-0667
  • OCLC
    48272706
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • Pre-print must be removed upon acceptance for publication
    • Post-print may be deposited in personal website or institutional repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must include statement that it is not the final published version
    • Published source must be acknowledged with full citation
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Must link to publisher version
    • NIH authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf after a 12 months embargo (see policy for details)
    • Wellcome Trust and HHMI authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf after a 6 months embargo (see policy for details)
    • If the hybrid open access option is not available, RCUK authors articles will be released as Creative Commons Attirbution Non-Commercial No Derivatives after a 6 months
    • Publisher last reviewed on 10/04/2014
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 11/2014; 37(6):421-2.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severely disabling disorder characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure ultimately leading to right heart failure and death. Treatment options have significantly increased over the past decade. Intravenous prostacyclins remain the treatment of choice for advanced PAH, leading to long-term clinical benefits and improved survival. Their administration requires a high level of nursing competency and presents considerable challenges for patients and caregivers. This article reviews the characteristics of currently available intravenous prostacyclins and provides a practical guide for nurses who may have had limited exposure to intravenous prostacyclins and their unique dosing, side effects, and titration characteristics.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 11/2014; 37(6):442-51.
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    ABSTRACT: When central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) spiked in an oncology unit of an acute care hospital in Philadelphia from October 2009 to March 2010, noncompliance with intravenous needleless connector disinfection was suspected as a factor. The hospital implemented a disinfection cap, a device designed to address compliance/variance issues with connector disinfection protocols. However, the incidence of CLABSIs increased again in 1 unit, apparently as the result of poor compliance with cap use. The hospital addressed the problem with multiple measures, after which the incidence of CLABSIs again continued to decline. Overall, 50% fewer CLABSIs occurred in the first 21 months after cap implementation. Potential net financial savings from cap use were calculated to be $464 440 a year. (See Abstract Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JIN/A63).
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 11/2014; 37(6):462-5.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine whether an association exists between cutting or trimming peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and the development of deep vein thromboses (DVTs). An observational, retrospective study was conducted on 634 patients who had a PICC inserted between 2011 and 2012. Patients who had a reverse-taper PICC inserted were assigned into 1 of 2 groups. The first group included patients with a reverse-taper PICC that was cut/trimmed (PC) before insertion (n = 224). The second group was made up of patients whose PICC was not cut/trimmed (PNC) before insertion (n = 410). All PICC-associated DVTs were confirmed by a positive venous Doppler result and recorded. A statistically significant difference (P < .001) was found between patients in the PC group who developed a DVT (9.82%) and patients in the PNC group in which PICCs were not trimmed (1.95%). There is evidence to suggest that altering the reverse-taper PICC by cutting or trimming the tip before insertion may be associated with increased DVTs. Further study is required to determine whether PICCs should be reduced in length or whether there is an appropriate method of trimming the catheter to ensure its stability after insertion.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 11/2014; 37(6):466-72.
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    ABSTRACT: Intravenous amiodarone is one of the most widely used antiarrythmics for the treatment of atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response. Peripheral amiodarone infusion, however, often causes pain during infusion and subsequent phlebitis.Data collection on a cardiac telemetry unit revealed a high rate of phlebitis. A multidisciplinary team developed and implemented amiodarone peripheral infusion guidelines. The pre-guideline phlebitis rate was 85% and post-guideline rate was 38%, representing a 47% change or improvement. An additional finding was that the severity of phlebitis was reduced, as well. The results of this study suggest that the implementation of a peripheral amiodarone infusion guideline reduced the incidence and severity of amiodarone-related phlebitis in the cardiac population.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 11/2014; 37(6):453-60.
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    ABSTRACT: An observational retrospective study audited the incidence of adverse events in 300 consecutive inpatients receiving a single, premade total nutrient admixture. No patient experienced critically high triglycerides; 16% of patients had a metabolic adverse event, including raised bilirubin, urea, creatinine, or liver enzymes. Line sepsis occurred on 30 occasions representing 0.67 infections per 1000 catheter days. Mortality was significantly higher in dialysis, nonsurgical, and intensive care unit patients. The use of a standard formulation for all parenterally nourished patients does not lead to an unacceptable incidence or severity of metabolic complications; however, it did not meet the protein requirements of surgical or critically ill patients. (See Abstract Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JIN/A62).
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 11/2014; 37(6):424-31.
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    ABSTRACT: Health care workers at an academic medical center in the Midwest were surveyed to identify common practices regarding heat use during peripheral intravenous (PIV) catheter insertion. Of the 907 who responded, the majority used heat to facilitate PIV insertion at least sometimes, when veins were not easily seen or not palpable, applying a commercial dry hot pack for 2 to 5 minutes before selecting an insertion site. Heat use correlated with practice role and population, frequency of PIV insertion, and perceived PIV skill. Findings will guide development of a research protocol to compare the effects of dry heat, moist heat, and no heat on PIV insertion success.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 11/2014; 37(6):433-40.
  • Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 09/2014; 37(5):315-316.
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    ABSTRACT: Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is indicated for adults and children who cannot digest and absorb food and who are able to receive therapy safely outside of a hospital. How successful this therapy is depends on the patient's support system and ability to learn and independently administer medically complex procedures. Transition to home is facilitated by identifying all necessary therapies, obtaining information to demonstrate medical necessity, establishing central venous access, reaching goal infusion rate, identifying who will write HPN orders, and coordinating care among all home care providers. An interdisciplinary team provides the most successful process to ensure safe HPN.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 09/2014; 37(5):389-395.
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    ABSTRACT: The evidence regarding the value of prophylactic anticoagulation to prevent peripherally inserted central catheter-related upper extremity venous thrombosis (PRUEVT) is inconsistent. The authors reviewed 3 years of data, identifying all cases of PRUEVT at a facility in Texas, and individually matched each for risk factors with 2 controls. Not being on any form of anticoagulant or antiplatelet agent was associated with a modestly increased risk of PRUEVT (odds ratio 1.93, P = .036, 95% confidence interval, 1.025-3.602). Each approach to thrombosis prevention showed a trend toward a protective effect, but none reached statistical significance individually.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 09/2014; 37(5):381-385.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Grant writing is an important step to building evidence for infusion nursing practice. This paper describes the role of the infusion nurse in developing a research proposal, identifying appropriate sources of funding, and preparing to write the grant application; identifies typical sections of a grant application and information necessary in each; and provides tips for writing an application that will contribute to a positive review.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 09/2014; 37(5):371-378.
  • Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 09/2014; 37(5):321-346.
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    ABSTRACT: Central vascular access devices (CVADs) provide reliable access for a variety of infusion therapies both in hospital and nonhospital settings. CVAD complications that are not identified and resolved can lead to a delay in therapy or the loss of vascular access. Rapid and accurate identification of complications is essential for obtaining expected treatment outcomes. This article will describe various nonthrombotic CVAD complications as well as identification and appropriate interventions used to manage these events.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 09/2014; 37(5):349-358.
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    ABSTRACT: Factors such as temperature, light exposure, drug concentration, ionic strength, time of infusion, and duration of drug association can influence the effectiveness of pharmacological solutions, which can compromise the solutions' quality, resulting in unstable solutions and drug incompatibility. The aim of this study was to determine the pH of solutions of dobutamine hydrochloride, fentanyl citrate, and their combination in 5% dextrose in water (D5W) under various light exposures and temperature conditions over time. The analysis was performed by measuring the pH of the substances in both pharmacological (commercial) preparations and in D5W under dark fluorescent light in the presence or absence of sunlight exposures, intravenous apparatus packaging (clear and amber burettes), and temperature (22°C and 37°C). Samples were collected immediately after preparation and after 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 24 hours of exposure to the various conditions; data were analyzed using mean standard deviations. Of the 260 pH values obtained, 50 (19.2%) were from commercial preparations and 210 (80.8%) from solutions exposed to various experimental conditions. Significant pH differences were found among the vials of the commercial preparation drugs. The largest pH value difference (0.88) was observed for fentanyl citrate, in which a pH increase of 0.88 (4.23 ± 0.62) was observed. The combination of drugs in D5W resulted in more acidic values than those of fentanyl citrate and of D5W and fentanyl citrate in D5W, but they were closer to what was observed for the solution of dobutamine hydrochloride in D5W. This solution was more acidic than fentanyl citrate diluted in D5W. The lower acidity of fentanyl citrate had a minor influence on the final pH of the combined drug solution in D5W. Under most conditions, the drug solutions kept at 22°C had pH values that were more acidic and less variable. Temperature was a major factor controlling the chemical behavior of the solutions analyzed. Analysis of chemical behavior in response to light exposure indicated that the solutions were more stable over time when kept in the dark.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 09/2014; 37(5):362-368.
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    ABSTRACT: Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare disorder that causes periodic attacks of sometimes painful swelling that may affect any organ system. HAE results in significant morbidity and diminished quality of life and requires patients to seek urgent medical care. HAE can be treated with C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate (C1-INH), icatibant, and ecallantide. Recent consensus guidelines recommend that all HAE patients be considered for training in self-administration of therapy to treat acute attacks or to prevent attacks. Many patients have safely and successfully self-administered intravenous infusions of C1-INH, resulting in rapid treatment, shortened attacks, and improved quality of life. With proper patient selection and adequate guidance and follow-up, self-administered C1-INH therapy is a viable and favorable option to treat HAE, particularly in patients with a moderate to high frequency of attacks.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 07/2014; 37(4):284-290.
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    ABSTRACT: Research has failed to demonstrate an optimal flushing solution or frequency for central catheters. In a 2002 study of 50 000 home care patients, catheter dysfunction with loss of patency was the most common complication and occurred in 29% of the peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) tracked. With the advent of the Affordable Care Act and the promise of expanded home care services, this study offers evidence as to a preferred flushing protocol to prevent catheter patency complications for home infusion patients with PICCs.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 07/2014; 37(4):270-281.
  • Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 07/2014; 37(4):234-237.
  • Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 07/2014; 37(4):229-230.
  • Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 07/2014; 34(4):236-7.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is the second part of a 2-part series that reports on the results of a prospective observational cohort study designed to examine risk factors associated with symptomatic upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Part 1, published in the May/June 2014 issue of the Journal of Infusion Nursing, provided an extensive review and critique of the literature regarding risk factors associated with catheter-related UEDVT and identified 28 suspected risk factors. A study was undertaken to examine each of the risk factors among 203 acute care patients with PICCs, 13 of whom experienced a UEDVT, yielding an incidence of 6.4%. The most common reason for admission was infection (33.5%), and the primary reason for insertion of the PICC was venous access (58.6%). Hypertension (P = .022) and obesity (P = .008), defined as a body mass index ≥30, were associated with UEDVT. The clinical symptoms of edema (P < .001) and a 3-cm or more increase in arm circumference (P < .001) in the PICC arm after PICC placement were associated with UEDVT. All other variables were not statistically significant. The results suggest that patients who are obese and hypertensive may be at greater risk for the development of UEDVT and that the physical finding of edema and increased arm circumference in the PICC arm are possibly suggestive of UEDVT.
    Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society 07/2014; 37(4):260-268.