Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

Journal description

Current impact factor: 0.56

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 0.561
2012 Impact Factor 0.469
2011 Impact Factor 0.705
2010 Impact Factor 0.549
2009 Impact Factor 0.465
2008 Impact Factor 0.538

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 5.90
Immediacy index 0.03
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Other titles Gastroenterology nursing (Online), Gastroenterology nursing
ISSN 1538-9766
OCLC 42471864
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • Pre-print must be removed upon acceptance for publication
    • Post-print may be deposited in personal website or institutional repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must include statement that it is not the final published version
    • Published source must be acknowledged with full citation
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Must link to publisher version
    • NIH authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf after a 12 months embargo (see policy for details)
    • Wellcome Trust and HHMI authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf after a 6 months embargo (see policy for details)
    • Publisher last reviewed on 19/03/2015
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors for urinary retention after hemorrhoidectomy. With the approval of West China Hospital of Sichuan University Ethics Board, data were abstracted from 961 charts of patients who underwent hemorrhoidectomy from January 1, 2009, to June 30, 2011. The outcome was urinary retention in the first 24 hours after surgery. Risk factors were identified using multivariable logistic regression, and they were expressed as odds ratios or 95% confidence intervals. The overall urinary retention rate was 14.8% (n = 142). Significant risk factors associated with postoperative urinary retention included female gender, anesthesia methods, severity of hemorrhoid, a large amount of intravenous fluid administered perioperatively, and length of hospital stay. Logistic regression analysis revealed that female gender (odds ratio, 2.607; p < .01), sacral anesthesia (odds ratio, 2.481; p = .02), more than 3 hemorrhoids resected (odds ratio, 2.658; p < .01), hemorrhoids having 4 degrees of severity (odds ratio, 3.101; p < .01), intravenous fluids > 700 ml (odds ratio, 1.597; p = .02), and length of stay more than 7 days (odds ratio, 1.852; p < .01) were significant predictors of urinary retention posthemorrhoidectomy.
    Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 05/2015; DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000121
  • Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 05/2015; DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000119
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    ABSTRACT: The standard of practice for colonoscopy is room air insufflation. Recent research demonstrates safety and significant decrease in postcolonoscopy discomfort from distention when carbon dioxide (CO2) is used during insufflation. Reducing abdominal pain after colonoscopy may lead to increased acceptance of colonoscopy screening for colorectal cancer. This study aims to compare patient comfort intra- and postprocedure, length of recovery, and nursing time in patients undergoing colonoscopy using room air vs. CO2 insufflation. This study uses an experimental design with patients randomly assigned to either room air or CO2 during colonoscopy. Physician endoscopists, postprocedure nurses, and patients were blinded to assignment. Prior bowel surgery, inflammatory bowel disease, or inability to consent excluded participants. Outcome measures included discomfort assessment, nursing tasks, and recovery time. Of 191 participants, 177 were men and 14 were women; 94 received room air; 97 received CO2. Patients insufflated with room air reported higher levels of some measures of discomfort: (a) during colonoscopy (p = .02), (b) on admission to recovery (p = .001), and (c) on discharge from recovery (p = .001). Patients receiving room air required more nursing tasks in recovery (p = .001) and more total nursing time (p = .001). Compared with room air, CO2 insufflation increases patient comfort and decreases nursing tasks and time.
    Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 05/2015; 38(3). DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000109
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the King's Stool Chart (KSC-Tr) in patients receiving enteral nutrition. In total, 212 stool samples taken from 25 patients receiving enteral nutrition during 393 sick days in two intensive care units were assessed using the KSC-Tr. Overall, 110 of 212 stools (51.9%) were characterized as liquid and 111 of 212 stools (52.4%) were characterized as less than 100 g. The daily stool score of patients receiving antibiotics, a risk factor for diarrhea, was higher (mean = 13.6; SD = 10.1) than that of patients not receiving antibiotics (mean = 9.3; SD = 5.0) (p = .001). Diarrhea occurred on more days when patients received antibiotics (62/329; 18.8%) than on days when they did not (3/64; 4.7%) (p = .005). Interobserver agreement of two independent nurses' assessments on 44 stool samples was examined and was good for both stool consistency (κ= 0.76) and stool weight (κ= 0.75). In the intensive care unit, the KSC-Tr can be used as a valid and reliable tool for monitoring diarrhea and stool output in patients receiving enteral nutrition.
    Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 05/2015; 38(3). DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000114
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    ABSTRACT: The possible involvement, although limited to the diagnostic phase of the procedure, of nonmedical staff (particularly endoscopy nurses) in lower digestive endoscopy has recently been suggested. Computer-based simulators have demonstrated objective evaluation of technical skills in digestive endoscopy. The aim of this study was to evaluate basic colonoscopy skills of endoscopy nurses (naive operators), as compared with junior physician staff and senior endoscopists, through a virtual reality colonoscopy simulator.In this single-center, prospective, nonrandomized study, 3 groups of digestive endoscopy operators (endoscopy nurses, junior doctors [<150 previous colonoscopies], expert doctors [>500 previous colonoscopies and >200/year]) completed six diagnostic cases generated by an endoscopic simulator (AccuTouch, Immersion Medical, Gaithersburg, MD). The performance parameters, collected by the simulator, were compared between groups. Five parameters have been considered for statistical analysis: time spent to reach the cecum; pain of any degree; severe/extreme pain; amount of insufflated air; percentage of visualized mucosa. Statistical analysis to compare the three groups has been performed by means of Wilcoxon test for two independent samples and by means of Kruskal-Wallis test for three independent samples (p < .05).Sixteen operators have been studied (six endoscopy nurses, five junior doctors, and five senior doctors); 96 colonoscopic procedures have been evaluated. Statistically significant differences between experts and naive operators were observed regarding time to reach the cecum and induction of severe/extreme pain, with both Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon test (p < .05); all other comparisons did not reach statistical significance. Although, as expected, expert doctors exceeded both junior doctors and naive operators in some relevant quality parameters of simulated diagnostic colonoscopies, the results obtained by less expert performers-and particularly by nursing staff-appear satisfactory as in regards to most of the considered quality parameters and suggest a potential value of this device in effectively teaching basic lower digestive endoscopy to beginners in a relatively short time.
    Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 05/2015; 38(3). DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000106
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    ABSTRACT: A nursing incentive directed toward enhanced communication, performance improvement, patient safety, and patient satisfaction was initiated by the staff nurses in an endoscopy unit of a 714-bed specialized teaching hospital. Data were collected from approximately 1,800 ambulatory patients using a hands-off communication tool. The population was evenly divided between males and females. The goals of the data collection focused on the utilization of a medical questionnaire given to patients prior to elective procedures. The purpose of this initial study was to ascertain whether the questionnaires contributed to patients' communication regarding their health record while facilitating the admission/assessment phase of undergoing an elective endoscopy procedure. The medical questionnaire also served as a patient education tool whereby staff promoted the importance of safe medication administration. The initiative will remain ongoing and future studies will monitor and identify areas needed for performance improvement, patient safety, and enhanced communication. Patient satisfaction is measured using Press Ganey results.
    Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 05/2015; 38(3):194-200. DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000116
  • Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 05/2015; 38(3):226-229. DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000110
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    ABSTRACT: Research on symptom distress experienced by patients with end-stage liver disease at the end of life is limited. The aims of the study were to describe presence, frequency, severity, and distress of symptoms in patients with end-stage liver disease toward the end of life and to describe the variability in psychological and physical symptom distress between and within patients over time. This study used a prospective, longitudinal descriptive design. Data were collected from 20 patients once a month for up to 6 months. Participants completed the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, which reports a total score, a Global Distress Index score, and a psychological and a physical distress score. Patients reported lack of energy, pain, difficulty sleeping, and feeling drowsy as the most frequent, severe, and distressing symptoms. Global Distress Index mean scores (measured on a 1-4 scale) ranged from 2.6 to 2.9 across time. There was notable variability in psychological and physical distress scores between and within patients across time. Gaining knowledge about the prevalent symptoms experienced by patients with end-stage liver disease and the trajectory of these symptoms is crucial for designing interventions that optimize well-being in patients with end-stage liver disease as they are approaching death.
    Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 05/2015; 38(3):201-210. DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000108
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    ABSTRACT: Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is an uncommon and potentially fatal cause of small bowel obstruction where the third portion of the duodenum is compressed between the abdominal aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. This is most frequently seen after sudden and significant weight loss, but other etiologies can also cause this duodenal compression. This syndrome can lead to food aversion, poor intake, and weight loss that exacerbate symptoms in a vicious cycle. SMA syndrome is often a diagnosis of exclusion due to nonspecific symptoms, including abdominal pain and distention, feelings of fullness after meals, and bilious emesis. Diagnosis may be assisted with radiography, tomography, endoscopy, and ultrasound imaging. Once SMA syndrome is identified, treatment is directed toward symptom management and nutritional support. If conservative measures fail, symptoms are severe, or the duodenum is compromised, several effective surgical procedures are routinely considered. This article provides an overview of SMA syndrome including history, pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, diagnostic testing, medical and surgical treatment, and implications for nursing staff.
    Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 05/2015; 38(3):189-193. DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000107
  • Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 05/2015; 38(3):230-234. DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000117
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    ABSTRACT: The Society for Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates (SGNA) launched a nurse fellowship program in 2011 to promote evidence-based practice. Each accepted applicant was challenged to select a relevant topic, explore the current research, and translate this information to daily practice. The author, an SGNA Fellow, selected the topic, nurse-administered propofol sedation, that has been a prevailing subject in endoscopy for many years. A significant amount of literature has been written on the drug's safety and efficacy. This article explores a brief history of the practice and the future of this controversial drug for procedural sedation. A review of current literature is explored with an emphasis on the past 5 years as well as a discussion on regulatory limitations that have been placed on the practice of non-anesthesiologist-administered propofol sedation.
    Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 03/2015; DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000099
  • Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 03/2015; 38(2):126-7. DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000101
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    ABSTRACT: Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is now the most common surgical procedure for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), offering promising long-term outcomes. Outcomes for 46 patients with GERD who underwent Nissen fundoplication during the last 5 years (November 2007-June 2012) were prospectively studied using a structured questionnaire that evaluated clinical symptom scores for heartburn, dysphagia, and satisfaction with clinical outcomes. Postoperative care of the patients including analgesia, median hospital stay, overall cost, and complications was also studied. Clinical follow-up data for 2 years after surgery were available for all 46 patients. Forty-two patients (91.3%) were satisfied with their quality of life and only eight patients (17.4%) continued to receive antacids after surgery. Dysphagia to solid and liquid occasionally appeared in 26.1% (N = 12) and 17.4% (N = 8) of patients, respectively. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication was an effective long-term treatment for GERD. The operation resulted in a significant reduction of symptoms and minimized the use of antacid drugs with a high degree of patient satisfaction. Although some patients may have returned to antacid treatment at late follow-up or continued to complain of mild discomfort, they were overall pleased with the outcome.
    Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 03/2015; 38(2):111-5. DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000097
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    ABSTRACT: The video capsule endoscopy is an accurate tool to investigate the entire small bowel. Currently, the nurse actively participates in the procedure from patient preparation to the video download, whereas a gastroenterologist interprets the endoscopic findings. However, few studies recently showed high accuracy of nurses in detecting lesions in the small bowel on video capsule endoscopy recordings. This prospective study aimed to assess the ability of experienced and trained nurses in detecting small bowel lesions as compared with gastroenterologists. Forty-six consecutive video capsule endoscopy procedures were analyzed. Overall, the nurse evaluation was highly (95.6%) accurate in detecting small bowel lesions, with a 100% concordance with the gastroenterologist for the relevant findings. In addition, the absence of lesions was confirmed by the endoscopist in all cases classified as negative by the nurse. Data of this study found that trained nurses, with a large experience in endoscopic features, correctly identified small bowel lesions on video capsule endoscopy recordings. Therefore, a trained nurse may accurately select the thumbnails of all mucosal irregularities that may be faster reviewed by the endoscopist for a final diagnosis.
    Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 03/2015; 38(2):107-10. DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000096
  • Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 03/2015; 38(2):93-4. DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000111
  • Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 03/2015; 38(2):129-33. DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000102
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    ABSTRACT: Patients on thiopurine therapy need frequent monitoring to prevent drug adverse events. To describe the structure and main results of a nurse-driven outpatient clinic (NDOC) program for the follow-up of patients receiving treatment with thiopurine immunosuppressants, we retrospectively reviewed patients' clinical charts on thiopurine drugs, azathioprine (AZA), and 6-mercaptopurine. We evaluated the efficacy of the NDOC by comparing the number of physician visits and the adequacy of laboratory controls for each patient before and after inclusion in the program. From January 2006 to December 2008, 179 patients were included. Of these, 102 had received thiopurines for at least 1 year before the start of the NDOC. Mean age was 42 ± 15 years; 83 were female. In all, 137 of the 179 patients (76%) had Crohn disease. AZA was the most frequent drug used (97%). Mean time of follow-up was 2.03 ± 0.9 years. Implementation of this program decreased the number of physician visits per year-from 4.6 ± 1.9 to 2.4 ± 1.3 (p < .001)-and the number of periods longer than 4 months without laboratory control (from 68% to 45%; p = .01). Leucopenia episodes and complications did not differ significantly before and after the start of the NDOC. Nurse-driven follow-up of these patients reduces physician visits while improving tightness of the follow-up.
    Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 03/2015; 38(2):116-20. DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000103
  • Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 03/2015; 38(2):122-4. DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000100
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    ABSTRACT: In 2002, a U.S. Multi-Society Task Force on colorectal cancer recommended a 6-minute or more withdrawal time as an indicator of a quality colonoscopy. In 2006, found a correlation between longer withdrawal time and an increased rate in the detection of adenomas. In January 2008, the endoscopy department at our institution adopted the Multi-Society Task Force recommendation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of a minimal 6-minute withdrawal time policy at our institution on polyp detection rate. All colonoscopies performed for screening indications from April 2007 to September 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. Group I (pre-policy) was compared with Group II (post-policy). Data collected included age, gender, indication, polyp detection rate, size, and withdrawal time. Unpaired t tests evaluated pre- and postprocedure results. Fisher's exact tests were used to compare detection rates between withdrawal time less than 6 minutes and more than 6 minutes. Mann-Whitney U Tests were performed to analyze the significance between the number of polyps detected for withdrawal time less than 6 minutes versus more than 6 minutes. A total of 1,342 colonoscopies were available for analysis in Group I and 1,316 in Group II. Polyp detection rate was 46.6% in Group I versus 48.2% in Group II (p = .39), a non-statistically significant difference; however, there was a trend toward identifying small- and medium-sized polyps in Group II. Small polyps can carry a risk of severe dysplasia (). Data were then analyzed for withdrawal time. The polyp detection rate was 20.9 in procedures that took less than 6 minutes versus 48.3 in those that took more than 6 minutes (p ≤ .01). In this study, a 6-minute or more withdrawal time increased the polyp detection rate by 133% for all polyp sizes, especially small and medium. Small polyps (5 mm or less) should be removed and not ignored. A 6-minute or more withdrawal time should be mandatory in those patients without a previous colon resection.
    Gastroenterology nursing: the official journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates 03/2015; 38(2):96-9. DOI:10.1097/SGA.0000000000000094