Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR

Publisher: Society of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; HighWire Press, Elsevier

Journal description

Current impact factor: 2.15

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.149
2012 Impact Factor 2.002
2011 Impact Factor 2.075
2010 Impact Factor 2.064
2009 Impact Factor 1.805
2008 Impact Factor 2.217
2007 Impact Factor 2.207
2006 Impact Factor 2.398
2005 Impact Factor 2.675
2004 Impact Factor 1.679
2003 Impact Factor 2.212
2002 Impact Factor 2.162
2001 Impact Factor 2.197
2000 Impact Factor 1.729
1999 Impact Factor 2.154
1998 Impact Factor 1.868
1997 Impact Factor 1.352
1996 Impact Factor 1.366

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 6.20
Immediacy index 0.31
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.63
Other titles Journal of vascular and interventional radiology (Online), Journal of vascular and interventional radiology, JVIR
ISSN 1535-7732
OCLC 46970420
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2015; 26(7). DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.03.003
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2015; 26(7). DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.03.016
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study reports 6 cases of hemoptysis originating from infectious pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms (PAPs). Selective pulmonary angiography revealed PAPs in 5 cases, and segmental pulmonary artery embolization was performed using coils and gelatin sponge particles. Systemic arterial embolization also was performed in 5 cases because of inadequate initial control or for shunts from systemic to pulmonary arteries. At a median follow-up time of 9 months (range, 25 d to 25 mo), no recurrence occurred, although 2 patients died of respiratory failure. Segmental artery embolization combined with systemic artery embolization may be useful in patients with hemoptysis secondary to PAPs. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2015; 26(7). DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.04.002
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2015; 26(7). DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.03.010
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2015; 26(7). DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.04.011
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2015; 26(7). DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.03.023
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2015; 26(7). DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.03.011
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2015; 26(7):1079-1082. DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.02.003
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This brief report describes a hybrid endovascular and open procedure to treat internal iliac artery (IIA) aneurysms and preserve pelvic blood flow. A covered stent was deployed before surgery in the superior gluteal artery, extending across the IIA aneurysm, with the proximal end in the common iliac artery lumen. During open aortoiliac aneurysm repair, the stent graft was anastomosed in an end-to-side manner to the surgical graft. Four aneurysms were treated in 3 patients. Technical success was achieved in all cases. There were no complications or repeat interventions. Stents were all patent at imaging follow-up (range, 6-25 mo). Patients were free from buttock claudication. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2015; 26(7):1040-1045. DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.03.025
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2015; 26(7):980-983. DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.05.012
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2015; 26(7):1088-1090. DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.03.018
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2015; 26(7):1082-1084. DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.02.015
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2015; 26(7):1077-1079. DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.01.035
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treatment of hepatic metastases from gastric adenocarcinoma. Of 24 patients who underwent percutaneous RF ablation after gastrectomy for a hepatic metastasis from a gastric cancer during the period 2000-2013, 19 were enrolled (median age, 63 y) with 21 metastatic tumors (mean diameter, 2.3 cm). Patient overall survival (OS) and local tumor progression-free survival (PFS) outcomes were assessed and compared according to patient and tumor characteristics, including tumor size and lobar distribution. The difference in diameter between tumor and ablation zone was compared according to lobar distribution. The median OS after RF ablation was 20.3 months, and the median local tumor PFS was 10.4 months. The OS rate was not significantly influenced by any patient or tumor characteristics. In multivariate analysis, independent negative prognostic factors for local tumor PFS were a tumor ≥ 3 cm in diameter (hazard ratio, 10.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-62.5; P = .009) and a tumor located in the left lobe (hazard ratio, 9.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-63.5; P = .026). The difference in diameter between the tumor and ablation zone was significantly different between the right and left lobes (right 1.8 cm ± 0.6 vs left 1.1 cm ± 0.70, P = .028). With the appropriate selection of patients with tumors ≤ 3 cm in diameter and with the possibility of sufficient safety margins, RF ablation is a safe and feasible treatment option for hepatic metastases from gastric adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.05.005
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    ABSTRACT: Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) bridging two or more Couinaud-Bismuth segments of the liver ("watershed tumors") can recruit multiple segmental arteries. The primary hypothesis of this study was that fewer watershed tumors show complete response (CR) after chemoembolization, with shorter time to local recurrence. Secondary analysis on the impact on transplantation eligibility in the presence of progressive disease was also performed. A total of 155 transplantation-eligible patients whose HCC met Milan criteria (watershed, n = 83; nonwatershed, n = 72) and was treated with chemoembolization were included. Cone-beam computed tomography (CT) was used for guidance and for confirmation of circumferential uptake. Local response to chemoembolization per modified Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors and local disease-free survival (DFS) for the index tumor were calculated. Differences were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. CR after a single of chemoembolization was observed in 55.4% of watershed tumors and in 72.2% of nonwatershed tumors (P = .045). Estimated DFS intervals were 151 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 93-245 d) and 336 days (95% CI, 231-747 d; P = .040) in the watershed and nonwatershed groups, respectively. Worse DFS was observed with a Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score > 20 (P = .0001), higher Child-Pugh-Turcotte score (P = .049), and watershed location (P = .040). Waiting list drop-off rates were statistically similar between groups. Hepatocellular carcinomas located in the watershed region of the liver have a poorer response to chemoembolization than those located elsewhere. These tumors are associated with worse DFS and require additional treatments to maintain transplantation eligibility per Milan criteria. Cone-beam CT can identify crossover supply and confirm complete geographic drug uptake, possibly reducing (but not eliminating) the risk of incomplete response. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.04.030
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    ABSTRACT: To construct prognostic nomograms capable of estimating individual probabilities of tumor progression and overall survival (OS) at specific time points during serial transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The study included 1,181 consecutive patients with nonmetastatic HCC undergoing repeated transarterial chemoembolization at a single tertiary referral center. Patients were assigned to 2 cohorts according to the first transarterial chemoembolization date: derivation (2004-2006; n = 854) and validation (2007; n = 327) sets. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were developed based on covariates derived before transarterial chemoembolization and assessed for their association with 5-year OS and 3-year progression-free survival (PFS). The accuracy of the models was internally and externally validated. The 5-year OS of the derivation set was 25.4%, and 3-year PFS was 20.8%. Nomograms for OS and PFS were built into the derivation set incorporating the following factors: log [tumor volume] calculated as 4/3 × 3.14 × (maximum radius of tumor in cm(3)); tumor number; tumor type (nodular or infiltrative); Child-Pugh class (A or B); (model for end-stage liver disease score/10)(-2); log [α-fetoprotein]; and portal vein invasion. The models had good discrimination and calibration abilities with C-indexes of 0.80 (5-y survival) and 0.77 (3-y progression). The results of external validation confirmed that these models performed well in terms of discrimination and goodness-of-fit (C-indexes 0.77 for 5-y survival and 0.73 for 3-y progression). Nomograms quantifying the survival and progression outcomes in patients treated with transarterial chemoembolization are useful clinical aids in providing personalized care. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.04.010
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effect of degree of necrosis after uterine artery embolization (UAE) on symptom recurrence at midterm clinical follow-up in patients with adenomyosis. Women (N = 50) who underwent UAE for symptomatic adenomyosis were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at baseline and 3 months after UAE and were followed clinically for at least 18 months. The type of adenomyosis was classified as focal or diffuse. The uterine volume and the percentage of necrosis after embolization were measured three-dimensionally on MR imaging. The percentage of the necrosis cutoff point for predicting recurrence was estimated. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the cutoff point. The rate of recurrence was compared between groups, and risk factors for recurrence were identified. During the follow-up period (range, 18-48 mo), symptom recurrence occurred in 12 of 50 patients. A necrosis cutoff point of 34.3% was calculated to predict recurrence (area under the curve = 0.721; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.577-0.839; P = .004). Patients with < 34.3% necrosis (group A, n = 12) were at a significantly higher risk of recurrence than patients with > 34.3% necrosis (group B, n = 38; hazard ratio = 7.0; 95% CI = 2.2, 22.4; P = .001). Initial uterine volume and type of adenomyosis were not associated with recurrence. The percentage of necrosis in patients with adenomyosis after UAE may predict symptom recurrence at midterm follow-up. The cutoff percentage of necrosis required to predict symptom recurrence was 34.3% in this study. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.04.026
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    ABSTRACT: To determine if postintervention cephalic arch stenosis (CAS) primary patency and access circuit patency are superior with the VIABAHN stent graft compared with angioplasty at 3, 6, and 12 months. All patients presenting with dysfunctional hemodialysis accesses with CAS over a 4-year period were assessed for inclusion in a randomized prospective study. A total of 14 patients were recruited across three centers. All patients had mature brachiocephalic fistulae. Five were randomized to undergo percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and nine to undergo stent-graft placement. Patency of the treated cephalic arch was assessed with transonic flow and/or follow-up fistulography. Variables assessed were diabetes, previous interventions performed on the access, access age and side, and sex. Patency was determined with Kaplan-Meier estimation. Anatomic and clinical success was obtained in all interventions. Mean patency intervals were 100 days in the PTA group and 300 days in the stent-graft group. Primary access circuit patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months were significantly different: 20%, 0%, and 0% for PTA and 100%, 67%, and 22% for stent grafts (P < .01). Primacy target lesion patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months were also significantly different: 60%, 0%, and 0% for PTA and 100%, 100%, and 29% for stent grafts (P < .01). No complications or adverse events were observed. Treatment of CAS with the VIABAHN stent graft appears to provide statistically superior primary patency rates compared with balloon angioplasty. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.05.001
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the role of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation in the management of hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS). A MEDLINE (PubMed) search from January 1990 to April 2015 was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The search was restricted to the English language and human subjects. Inclusion criteria were patients with HPS who underwent TIPS creation for any indication. Exclusion criteria was age < 18 years. Ten studies consisting of 12 patients with HPS were included. Eight patients had very severe HPS, 2 had severe HPS, and 2 had moderate HPS. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation was technically successful in all patients, without complications. Mean portosystemic pressure gradients before and after the procedure were 18.2 mm Hg (range, 10-30 mm Hg) and 6.5 mm Hg (range, 3-15 mm Hg), respectively. The mean duration of follow-up was 9.3 months (range, 0.75-36 mo). Improvement in oxygenation occurred in 9 patients but was not sustained after 4 months in 2 patients. In the remaining 3 patients, oxygenation remained unchanged; it worsened after 4 months in 1 patient. Four patients underwent liver transplantation. Two patients died of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and 1 died of sepsis. The remaining patients were alive and well at the time of last follow-up. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation shows promise in the management of HPS. Future prospective studies are warranted. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.04.017
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the readability of online education materials offered by hospitals describing commonly performed interventional radiology (IR) procedures. Online patient education materials from 402 hospitals selected from the Medicare Hospital Compare database were assessed. The presence of an IR service was determined by representation in the Society of Interventional Radiology physician finder directory. Patient online education materials about (i) uterine artery embolization for fibroid tumors, (ii) liver cancer embolization, (iii) varicose vein treatment, (iv) central venous access, (v) inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement, (vi) nephrostomy tube insertion, (vii) gastrostomy tube placement, and (viii) vertebral augmentation were targeted and assessed by using six validated readability scoring systems. Of 402 hospitals sampled, 156 (39%) were presumed to offer IR services. Of these, 119 (76%) offered online patient education material for one or more of the eight service lines. The average readability scores corresponding to grade varied between the ninth- and 12th-grade levels. All were higher than the recommended seventh-grade level (P < .05) except for nephrostomy and gastrostomy tube placement. Average Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease scores ranged from 42 to 69, corresponding with fairly difficult to difficult readability for all service lines except IVC filter and gastrostomy tube placement, which corresponded with standard readability. A majority of hospitals offering IR services provide at least some online patient education material. Most, however, are written significantly above the reading comprehension level of most Americans. More attention to health literacy by hospitals and IR physicians is warranted. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 06/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.jvir.2015.04.029