Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR

Publisher: Society of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; HighWire Press, Elsevier

Description

Impact factor 1.81

  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    6.20
  • Immediacy index
    0.31
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.63
  • Other titles
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology (Online), Journal of vascular and interventional radiology, JVIR
  • ISSN
    1535-7732
  • OCLC
    46970420
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To retrospectively evaluate long-term survival outcomes of radiofrequency (RF) ablation of colorectal lung metastases and evaluate factors associated with improved survival. Eighty-four patients (46 male and 38 female; median age, 65 y) with 172 colorectal lung metastases (median size, 1.2 cm) underwent 113 RF ablation sessions. Thirteen patients had viable extrapulmonary recurrences at the time of RF ablation. The primary endpoint was patient survival. Prognostic factors associated with survival were determined by univariate and multivariate analyses. Secondary endpoints were local tumor progression and adverse events (per National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0). During follow-up (median duration, 37.5 mo), 36 patients (42.9%) died. The estimated overall survival (OS) rates were 95.2%, 65.0%, and 51.6% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively (median OS time, 67.0 mo). Multivariate analysis revealed that a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level of at least 5 ng/mL before RF ablation (P = .03) and the presence of viable extrapulmonary recurrences at the time of RF ablation (P = .001) were independent negative prognostic factors. The local tumor progression rate was 14.0% (24 of 172 tumors). Grade 3 adverse events were observed after two sessions (1.8%), and grade 4/5 adverse events were not observed. RF ablation of colorectal lung metastases provided favorable long-term survival with a low incidence of severe adverse events. Independent prognostic factors were a high CEA level before RF ablation and the presence of viable extrapulmonary recurrences at the time of RF ablation. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015;
  • Gi-Ae Kim, Ju Hyun Shim, Sang Min Yoon, Jinhong Jung, Jong Hoon Kim, Min-Hee Ryu, Baek-Yeol Ryoo, Yoon-Koo Kang, Danbi Lee, Kang Mo Kim, Young-Suk Lim, Han Chu Lee, Young-Hwa Chung, Yung Sang Lee
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To compare efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization with and without radiation therapy (RT) versus sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). This single-center retrospective study involved 557 patients with HCC with PVTT who initially received chemoembolization (1997-2002; n = 295), chemoembolization and RT (2003-2008; n = 196), or sorafenib (2009-2012; n = 66) according to eligibility criteria among an initial population of 617. The three groups were divided into three pairs (chemoembolization vs chemoembolization/RT, chemoembolization vs sorafenib, and chemoembolization/RT vs sorafenib), and time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were compared by propensity-score analyses. The chemoembolization/RT group had longer median TTP and OS than the chemoembolization-alone and sorafenib groups (P < .001). Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that chemoembolization/RT treatment was an independent predictor of favorable TTP and OS. In the matched cohort, median TTP and OS were significantly longer in the chemoembolization/RT group than the chemoembolization-alone group (102 pairs; TTP, 8.7 mo vs 3.6 mo [P < .001]; OS, 11.4 mo vs 7.4 mo [P = .023]) or the sorafenib group (30 pairs; TTP, 5.1 mo vs 1.6 mo [P < .001]; OS, 8.2 mo vs 3.2 mo [P < .001]), in agreement with the inverse probability of treatment weighted (IPTW) outcomes. In matching analyses, the chemoembolization-alone group had longer median TTP and OS than the sorafenib group (46 pairs; TTP, 3.4 mo vs 1.8 mo [P < .001]; OS, 5.9 mo vs 4.4 mo [P = .003]). There was no significant difference in terms of OS with the IPTW approach (P = .108), but there was one in terms of TTP (P < .001). Within the limitation of a retrospective study, the present data indicate that transarterial chemoembolization combined with RT could be considered as an alternative to the standard sorafenib in the treatment of patients with advanced-stage HCC with PVTT. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015;
  • Yozo Sato, Yoshitaka Inaba, Shinichi Murata, Hidekazu Yamaura, Mina Kato, Hiroshi Kawada, Yasuhiro Shimizu, Tsuneo Ishiguchi
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the feasibility of percutaneous drainage via the blind end of the jejunal limb (BEJL) for afferent limb syndrome and pancreatic fistula. Percutaneous drainage via the BEJL was performed in eight patients (seven men and one woman; mean age, 63 y; range, 42-71 y) presenting with afferent limb syndrome (n = 6) or pancreatic fistula (n = 2) following pancreatoduodenectomy or bile duct resection with reconstruction at our institute from March 2005 to June 2013. Reconstruction was performed by using a modified Child method or the Roux-en-Y method, and the BEJL was surgically fixed to the abdominal wall. Afferent limb syndrome was caused by tumor recurrence or postoperative complications. Technical success, clinical success, and complications were evaluated retrospectively. Technical success of drainage via BEJL was achieved in all patients. Drainage catheters (5-10 F) were inserted into the afferent limbs of six patients, into the pancreatic duct of one patient, and into the pancreatic fistula of one patient. Metallic stents were subsequently placed to address malignant afferent limb obstruction in two patients. Clinical success was achieved in seven patients (87.5%), and no patients developed major complications. Drainage catheters were removed from four patients. The mean catheter indwelling period in all patients was 143 days (range, 21-292 d). Percutaneous drainage via BEJL after pancreatoduodenectomy or bile duct resection may be a feasible treatment for afferent limb syndrome and pancreatic fistula. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the differences in efficiency and complications of metal stent insertion across versus above the main duodenal papilla (MDP) in patients with malignant obstruction of the common bile duct (CBD). Records of 98 consecutive patients who underwent stent insertion for malignant CBD obstruction between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Fifty-one patients (group 1) and 47 patients (group 2) were treated with stent insertion across and above the MDP, respectively. Primary stent patency, overall survival, complications, and changes in serum bilirubin level following stent insertion were assessed. Infection appeared in 12 and four patients, respectively, in groups 1 and 2. The respective mean primary stent patency times were 307.8 days ± 20.2 and 490.7 days ± 40.7, and mean survival times were 245.1 days ± 17.4 and 286.3 days ± 20.2. Bilirubin reduction rates were 55.7% ± 16.6 and 61.1% ± 13.7 at 1 week and 84.2% ± 5.7 and 86.2% ± 5.7 at 1 month in groups 1 and 2, respectively. In group 2, the rate of infection was significantly lower (P = .044) and primary stent patency was longer (P = .019). However, there was no significant difference between groups in survival time (P = .074) or bilirubin reduction rate at 1 week (P = .083) or 1 month (P = .082). Bile stent insertion above the MDP may achieve longer stent patency and a lower infection rate compared with placement across the MDP. For patients with malignant CBD obstruction, biliary stents should be placed above the papilla if papillary lesions are not invaded. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To describe the safety and efficacy of prostatic artery embolization (PAE) with spherical microparticles to treat lower urinary tract symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia in patients with prostate volume > 90 g. This prospective, single-center, single-arm study was conducted in 35 patients with prostate volumes ranging from 90-252 g. Mean patient age was 64.8 years (range, 53-77 y). Magnetic resonance imaging, uroflowmetry, and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) were used to assess clinical and functional outcomes. Mean prostate size decreased significantly from 135.1 g before PAE to 91.9 g at 3 months of follow-up (P < .0001). Mean IPSS and quality-of-life index improved from 18.3 to 2.7 and 4.8 to 0.9 (P < .0001 for both), respectively. A significant negative correlation was observed between prostate-specific antigen at 24 hours after PAE and IPSS 3 months after PAE (P = .0057). PAE is a safe and effective treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia in patients with prostate volume > 90 g. Excessively elevated prostate-specific antigen within 24 hours of PAE is associated with lower symptom burden in short-term follow-up. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015; 26(1):87-93.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To assess the effects of iliofemoral vein stent placement on symptomatic lower extremity swelling (LES), presumed to be lymphedema, in patients with cancer. During the period 2005-2013, 62 patients (38 female; age, 60.4 y ± 15.4) with histology-proven metastatic disease and LES resistant to standard therapies were evaluated and found to have venous outflow obstruction. Stents were placed in the iliofemoral veins or inferior vena cava, or both, and evaluated by color Doppler ultrasound or contrast-enhanced computed tomography during the follow-up period. Patient symptoms were assessed using the Venous Disability Score (VDS) and the Galway Limb Swelling score, a patient-directed, 5-question symptom scoring system. Stents were successfully placed in all patients. During the follow-up period, in-stent thrombosis occurred in 13 patients, and additional stents were placed in 3 patients to treat luminal narrowing. The mean VDS improved significantly (P < .05): from 3.0 ± 0 on the day of the procedure to 2.95 ± 0.22 on day 3, 2.0 ± 0.33 on day 7, and 1.87 ± 0.34 on day 30. The mean Galway Limb Swelling score also improved significantly (P < 0.001): from 3.6 ± 0.74 on the day of the procedure to 1.96 ± 0.91 on day 3, 1.06 ± 0.78 on day 7, and 0.6 ± 0.66 on day 30. During the follow-up period, 60 patients died as a result of their underlying malignancy (mean, 230 d; range, 5-1,080 d). Iliofemoral or iliocaval venous stent placement may have a valuable role in patients with metastatic disease and symptomatic LES associated with venous obstruction. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015; 26(1):39-45.
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015; 26(1):135-7.
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015; 26(1):144-6.
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015; 26(1):139-42.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Google Trends was used to characterize the relationship between the interventional radiology (IR) applicant pool and related Internet queries for "IR fellowship" from July 2006 to July 2013. Results were compared with National Residency Match Panel data by regression analysis and one-way analysis of variance. Search traffic for IR fellowship demonstrated a statistically significant linear annual increase (R(2) = 0.87; P = .0013). Total IR applicants increased by 184% (R(2) = 0.98; P = .0216). Search traffic was predictive of applicants for each match year (R(2) = 0.92; P = .0004) and programs filled (R(2) = 0.93; P = .0003). Internet queries mirror trainee professional interests, with significant increases in search traffic related to IR fellowship and strong correlation with growth in applicants. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015; 26(1):95-100.
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015; 26(1):142-4.
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015; 26(1):137-9.
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015; 26(1):131-3.
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015; 26(1):1-2.
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015; 26(1):3-6.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A 46-year-old woman underwent inferior vena cava filter placement before bariatric surgery and returned within 6 months for routine removal. She complained of a 1-week history of severe chest pain, and during retrieval, two fractured filter components were identified including one arm in the right ventricle. The filter body and one fragment were successfully retrieved, but the fragment in the right ventricle was refractory to percutaneous retrieval. During open-heart surgery, the fragment was found traversing through the ventricular wall resulting in cardiac tamponade. Electron microscopic fragment analysis revealed high-cycle metal fatigue indicating the filter design failed to withstand this patient's natural inferior vena cava biomechanical motions. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015; 26(1):111-115.e1.
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2015; 26(1):133-4.