New England Journal of Medicine Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Massachusetts Medical Society, Massachusetts Medical Society

Journal description

One of the world's leading medical journals, the NEJM publishes original research and interpretive articles in major aspects of medicine: its science, its art and practice, and its position in today's society. Each week, The Journal presents major, previously unpublished research results, clinical findings, updates and opinions.

Current impact factor: 54.42

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 54.42
2012 Impact Factor 51.658
2011 Impact Factor 53.298
2010 Impact Factor 53.484
2009 Impact Factor 47.05
2008 Impact Factor 50.017
2007 Impact Factor 52.589
2006 Impact Factor 51.296
2005 Impact Factor 44.016
2004 Impact Factor 38.57
2003 Impact Factor 34.833
2002 Impact Factor 31.736
2001 Impact Factor 29.065
2000 Impact Factor 29.512
1999 Impact Factor 28.857
1998 Impact Factor 28.66
1997 Impact Factor 27.766
1996 Impact Factor 24.834
1995 Impact Factor 22.412
1994 Impact Factor 22.673
1993 Impact Factor 23.762
1992 Impact Factor 24.455

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 50.81
Cited half-life 8.00
Immediacy index 12.67
Eigenfactor 0.66
Article influence 21.49
Website New England Journal of Medicine website
Other titles New England journal of medicine (Online), New England journal of medicine, NEJM
ISSN 1533-4406
OCLC 34945333
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Massachusetts Medical Society

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Publisher's version/PDF must be used
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • On non-profit open access repository, including institutional repository
    • NIH and Wellcome Trust authors will have their published article deposited in PubMed Central on their behalf after 6 months embargo
    • Publisher last reviewed on 09/07/2015
  • Classification
    ​ white

Publications in this journal

  • Derek J Hausenloy · Derek M Yellon
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; DOI:10.1056/NEJMe1509718
  • Thien-Tri Cung · Olivier Morel · Guillaume Cayla · Gilles Rioufol · David Garcia-Dorado · Denis Angoulvant · Eric Bonnefoy-Cudraz · Patrice Guérin · Meier Elbaz · Nicolas Delarche · [...] · Patrick Staat · Arnaud Sudre · Eskil Elmer · Magnus J Hansson · Cyrille Bergerot · Inesse Boussaha · Claire Jossan · Geneviève Derumeaux · Nathan Mewton · Michel Ovize
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    ABSTRACT: Background Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that cyclosporine may attenuate reperfusion injury and reduce myocardial infarct size. We aimed to test whether cyclosporine would improve clinical outcomes and prevent adverse left ventricular remodeling. Methods In a multicenter, double-blind, randomized trial, we assigned 970 patients with an acute anterior ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who were undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 12 hours after symptom onset and who had complete occlusion of the culprit coronary artery to receive a bolus injection of cyclosporine (administered intravenously at a dose of 2.5 mg per kilogram of body weight) or matching placebo before coronary recanalization. The primary outcome was a composite of death from any cause, worsening of heart failure during the initial hospitalization, rehospitalization for heart failure, or adverse left ventricular remodeling at 1 year. Adverse left ventricular remodeling was defined as an increase of 15% or more in the left ventricular end-diastolic volume. Results A total of 395 patients in the cyclosporine group and 396 in the placebo group received the assigned study drug and had data that could be evaluated for the primary outcome at 1 year. The rate of the primary outcome was 59.0% in the cyclosporine group and 58.1% in the control group (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 1.39; P=0.77). Cyclosporine did not reduce the incidence of the separate clinical components of the primary outcome or other events, including recurrent infarction, unstable angina, and stroke. No significant difference in the safety profile was observed between the two treatment groups. Conclusions In patients with anterior STEMI who had been referred for primary PCI, intravenous cyclosporine did not result in better clinical outcomes than those with placebo and did not prevent adverse left ventricular remodeling at 1 year. (Funded by the French Ministry of Health and NeuroVive Pharmaceutical; CIRCUS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01502774 ; EudraCT number, 2009-013713-99 .).
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; DOI:10.1056/NEJMoa1505489
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    ABSTRACT: A previously healthy 8-year-old boy presented with recurrent terminal gross hematuria. Two years earlier, after he had been swimming near a dam in Ghana, hematuria had developed, which subsequently resolved. Urine microscopy revealed oval eggs and free-swimming larvae, shown in a video.
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(9):e11. DOI:10.1056/NEJMicm1410250
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    ABSTRACT: Background Sleep loss in attending physicians has an unclear effect on patient outcomes. In this study, we examined the effect of medical care provided by physicians after midnight on the outcomes of their scheduled elective procedures performed during the day. Methods We conducted a population-based, retrospective, matched-cohort study in Ontario, Canada. Patients undergoing 1 of 12 elective daytime procedures performed by a physician who had treated patients from midnight to 7 a.m. were matched in a 1:1 ratio to patients undergoing the same procedure by the same physician on a day when the physician had not treated patients after midnight. Outcomes included death, readmission, complications, length of stay, and procedure duration. We used generalized estimating equations to compare outcomes between patient groups. Results We included 38,978 patients, treated by 1448 physicians, in the study, of whom 40.6% were treated at an academic center. We found no significant difference in the primary outcome (death, readmission, or complication) between patients who underwent a daytime procedure performed by a physician who had provided patient care after midnight and those who underwent a procedure performed by a physician who had not treated patients after midnight (22.2% and 22.4%, respectively; P=0.66; adjusted odds ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.95 to 1.03). We also found no significant difference in outcomes after stratification for academic versus nonacademic center, physician's age, or type of procedure. Secondary analyses revealed no significant difference between patient groups in length of stay or procedure duration. Conclusions Overall, the risks of adverse outcomes of elective daytime procedures were similar whether or not the physician had provided medical services the previous night. (Funded by the University of Toronto Dean's Fund and others.).
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(9):845-53. DOI:10.1056/NEJMsa1415994
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: Verma et al. (May 7 issue)(1) report that the performance of neither linear ablation nor ablation of complex fractionated electrograms provided an incremental benefit when added to pulmonary-vein isolation to decrease the rate of recurrent atrial fibrillation. Di Biase et al.(2) note that the left atrial appendage acts as a potential trigger for atrial fibrillation or atrial tachycardia in approximately 27% of patients with atrial fibrillation who require repeat catheter ablation. They found that recurrent atrial fibrillation was significantly reduced in patients undergoing isolation of the left atrial appendage (segmental or circumferential ablation), with a recurrence rate . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(9):877-9. DOI:10.1056/NEJMc1508689#SA3
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    ABSTRACT: The day after he was born, an infant boy had nonbilious vomiting, choking after feeding, and abdominal distention with no meconium. Radiography of the abdomen while the infant was upright revealed a single "bubble," representing a dilated stomach with a fluid level.
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(9):863. DOI:10.1056/NEJMicm1411375
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: The analysis by Kaukonen et al. (April 23 issue),(1) which uses data from the Australia and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS) Adult Patient Database (APD), may overestimate the size of the postulated population that did not meet the criteria for the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (i.e., patients with SIRS-negative severe sepsis). First, the original SIRS definition included not only an abnormal total white-cell count but also the presence of more than 10% immature neutrophils.(2) The APD does not capture the presence of immature neutrophils. Of the 12.1% of the patients who did not meet the . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(9):879-81. DOI:10.1056/NEJMc1506819#SA3
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: The analysis by Kaukonen et al. (April 23 issue),(1) which uses data from the Australia and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS) Adult Patient Database (APD), may overestimate the size of the postulated population that did not meet the criteria for the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (i.e., patients with SIRS-negative severe sepsis). First, the original SIRS definition included not only an abnormal total white-cell count but also the presence of more than 10% immature neutrophils.(2) The APD does not capture the presence of immature neutrophils. Of the 12.1% of the patients who did not meet the . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(9):879-81. DOI:10.1056/NEJMc1506819#SA1
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    ABSTRACT: A 78-year-old man presented with hypercalcemia and renal failure. Chest imaging studies revealed bilateral lymphadenopathy, and examination of a kidney-biopsy specimen showed an infiltrate of mononuclear cells. A diagnostic procedure was performed.
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(9):864-73. DOI:10.1056/NEJMcpc1310003
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: The analysis by Kaukonen et al. (April 23 issue),(1) which uses data from the Australia and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS) Adult Patient Database (APD), may overestimate the size of the postulated population that did not meet the criteria for the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (i.e., patients with SIRS-negative severe sepsis). First, the original SIRS definition included not only an abnormal total white-cell count but also the presence of more than 10% immature neutrophils.(2) The APD does not capture the presence of immature neutrophils. Of the 12.1% of the patients who did not meet the . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(9):879-81. DOI:10.1056/NEJMc1506819#SA2
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    ABSTRACT: Key Clinical Points Primary Care for Men Who Have Sex with Men Providers should identify men who have sex with men so that appropriate medical care can be administered. The vaccinations provided for men who have sex with men should include those against the hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus, human papillomavirus (in men ≤26 years of age), and in certain regions, Neisseria meningitidis. A detailed discussion of sexual activity is essential to guide strategies for the prevention of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and for the administration of tests for sexually transmitted infections. Men who are at increased risk for HIV infection, especially those who have anal sex with multiple partners without the use of condoms, should be offered preexposure prophylaxis to reduce the risk of HIV acquisition. Testing for sexually transmitted infections should occur once or twice a year, depending on the patient's ongoing sexual activity.
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(9):854-62. DOI:10.1056/NEJMcp1401303
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: Verma et al. (May 7 issue)(1) report that the performance of neither linear ablation nor ablation of complex fractionated electrograms provided an incremental benefit when added to pulmonary-vein isolation to decrease the rate of recurrent atrial fibrillation. Di Biase et al.(2) note that the left atrial appendage acts as a potential trigger for atrial fibrillation or atrial tachycardia in approximately 27% of patients with atrial fibrillation who require repeat catheter ablation. They found that recurrent atrial fibrillation was significantly reduced in patients undergoing isolation of the left atrial appendage (segmental or circumferential ablation), with a recurrence rate . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(9):877-9. DOI:10.1056/NEJMc1508689#SA1
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: The analysis by Kaukonen et al. (April 23 issue),1 which uses data from the Australia and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS) Adult Patient Database (APD), may overestimate the size of the postulated population that did not meet the criteria for the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (i.e., patients with SIRS-negative severe sepsis). First, the original SIRS definition included not only an abnormal total white-cell count but also the presence of more than 10% immature neutrophils.2 The APD does not capture the presence of immature neutrophils. Of the 12.1% of the patients who did not meet the . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(9-9):879-881. DOI:10.1056/NEJMc1506819#SA4
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    ABSTRACT: Background Data on the effect of initial combination therapy with ambrisentan and tadalafil on long-term outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension are scarce. Methods In this event-driven, double-blind study, we randomly assigned, in a 2:1:1 ratio, participants with World Health Organization functional class II or III symptoms of pulmonary arterial hypertension who had not previously received treatment to receive initial combination therapy with 10 mg of ambrisentan plus 40 mg of tadalafil (combination-therapy group), 10 mg of ambrisentan plus placebo (ambrisentan-monotherapy group), or 40 mg of tadalafil plus placebo (tadalafil-monotherapy group), all administered once daily. The primary end point in a time-to-event analysis was the first event of clinical failure, which was defined as the first occurrence of a composite of death, hospitalization for worsening pulmonary arterial hypertension, disease progression, or unsatisfactory long-term clinical response. Results The primary analysis included 500 participants; 253 were assigned to the combination-therapy group, 126 to the ambrisentan-monotherapy group, and 121 to the tadalafil-monotherapy group. A primary end-point event occurred in 18%, 34%, and 28% of the participants in these groups, respectively, and in 31% of the pooled-monotherapy group (the two monotherapy groups combined). The hazard ratio for the primary end point in the combination-therapy group versus the pooled-monotherapy group was 0.50 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35 to 0.72; P<0.001). At week 24, the combination-therapy group had greater reductions from baseline in N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels than did the pooled-monotherapy group (mean change, -67.2% vs. -50.4%; P<0.001), as well as a higher percentage of patients with a satisfactory clinical response (39% vs. 29%; odds ratio, 1.56 [95% CI, 1.05 to 2.32]; P=0.03) and a greater improvement in the 6-minute walk distance (median change from baseline, 48.98 m vs. 23.80 m; P<0.001). The adverse events that occurred more frequently in the combination-therapy group than in either monotherapy group included peripheral edema, headache, nasal congestion, and anemia. Conclusions Among participants with pulmonary arterial hypertension who had not received previous treatment, initial combination therapy with ambrisentan and tadalafil resulted in a significantly lower risk of clinical-failure events than the risk with ambrisentan or tadalafil monotherapy. (Funded by Gilead Sciences and GlaxoSmithKline; AMBITION ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01178073 .).
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(9):834-44. DOI:10.1056/NEJMoa1413687
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    ABSTRACT: In July, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a proposed rule for a new Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CCJR) program. The program would establish bundled payments for total hip and knee replacements, covering hospitalizations, professional fees, and all clinically related Medicare Part A and Part B services for 90 days after discharge, including skilled nursing facility care, home care, and hospital readmissions. CCJR is similar to another model CMS is testing called Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI), but whereas BPCI is voluntary, hospitals would be required to participate in CCJR. CMS proposes implementing the 5-year . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; DOI:10.1056/NEJMp1509155
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    ABSTRACT: Multiple myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells that has an estimated incidence of 26,850 new patients in 2015 in the United States.(1) In the past few years, dramatic progress has been made in the treatment of this disease. New classes of drugs, including proteasome inhibitors (e.g., bortezomib and carfilzomib) and immunomodulatory agents (e.g., lenalidomide and pomalidomide), have improved response rates and survival significantly, and it now appears that immunotherapy is likely to lead to even greater advances. Results regarding the use of daratumumab, an antibody directed against CD38, in patients with relapsed, refractory multiple myeloma are now reported in . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; DOI:10.1056/NEJMe1509419
  • New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(8):773-4. DOI:10.1056/NEJMc1508222#SA2
  • New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(8):778. DOI:10.1056/NEJMc1507811#SA2
  • New England Journal of Medicine 08/2015; 373(8):693-5. DOI:10.1056/NEJMp1505660