New England Journal of Medicine (New Engl J Med )

Publisher: Massachusetts Medical Society

Description

One of the world's leading medical journals, the NEJM publishes original research and interpretive articles in major aspects of medicine: its science, its art and practice, and its position in today's society. Each week, The Journal presents major, previously unpublished research results, clinical findings, updates and opinions.

  • Impact factor
    54.42
  • 5-year impact
    50.81
  • Cited half-life
    8.00
  • Immediacy index
    12.67
  • Eigenfactor
    0.66
  • Article influence
    21.49
  • Website
    New England Journal of Medicine website
  • Other titles
    New England journal of medicine (Online), New England journal of medicine, NEJM
  • ISSN
    1533-4406
  • OCLC
    34945333
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Dipankar Nandi
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: Mayosi and colleagues (Sept. 18 issue)(1) found a lack of efficacy of Mycobacterium indicus pranii in the large, clinical Investigation of the Management of Pericarditis (IMPI) trial involving patients presumed to have tuberculous pericarditis. In addition, an increase in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cancers was observed in patients who received injections of M. indicus pranii. Some reasons for the observations with M. indicus pranii in this study would be useful. M. indicus pranii is a saprophytic bacterium reported to have immunomodulatory abilities.(2),(3) It stimulates the toll-like receptor pathway and induces a number of inflammatory cytokines. . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2531-5.
  • Frank Brodzik, Gundabhaktha Chikkappa, Donald Pasquale
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: In the review of microcytic anemia by DeLoughery (Oct. 2 issue),(1) two commonly encountered causes of microcytic anemia and iron deficiency were not mentioned: chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and the long-term use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs).(2),(3) H. pylori is known to consume iron and thereby makes dietary iron unavailable for absorption.(4) Gastric acid is required for effective absorption of dietary iron, and PPIs, which inhibit acid production, may impair absorption.(2) It is our practice to consider screening all patients with iron-deficiency anemia for H. pylori infection and to consider withholding PPI therapy while patients are . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2535-7.
  • Nirav M Desai, Bakulesh M Khamar
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: Mayosi and colleagues (Sept. 18 issue)(1) found a lack of efficacy of Mycobacterium indicus pranii in the large, clinical Investigation of the Management of Pericarditis (IMPI) trial involving patients presumed to have tuberculous pericarditis. In addition, an increase in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cancers was observed in patients who received injections of M. indicus pranii. Some reasons for the observations with M. indicus pranii in this study would be useful. M. indicus pranii is a saprophytic bacterium reported to have immunomodulatory abilities.(2),(3) It stimulates the toll-like receptor pathway and induces a number of inflammatory cytokines. . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2531-5.
  • Agnès Meybeck, Armelle Pasquet, Eric Senneville
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: Mayosi and colleagues (Sept. 18 issue)(1) found a lack of efficacy of Mycobacterium indicus pranii in the large, clinical Investigation of the Management of Pericarditis (IMPI) trial involving patients presumed to have tuberculous pericarditis. In addition, an increase in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cancers was observed in patients who received injections of M. indicus pranii. Some reasons for the observations with M. indicus pranii in this study would be useful. M. indicus pranii is a saprophytic bacterium reported to have immunomodulatory abilities.(2),(3) It stimulates the toll-like receptor pathway and induces a number of inflammatory cytokines. . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2531-5.
  • Anil K Rustgi, Hashem B El-Serag
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    ABSTRACT: The 5-year survival rate in esophageal cancer, although poor, has improved over the past decade. This review discusses the epidemiologic aspects, pathogenesis, prevention, and therapy of esophageal adenocarcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma, focusing on recent advances.
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2499-509.
  • Thorsten Hornung, Viktor Janzen, Franz-Josef Heidgen, Dominik Wolf, Thomas Bieber, Joerg Wenzel
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    ABSTRACT: Myelofibrosis, with positivity for the JAK2 V617F mutation, developed in a patient with long-standing, poorly controlled dermatomyositis. When the myelofibrosis was treated with ruxolitinib, the dermatomyositis went into remission.
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2537-8.
  • Cainan Foltz, Williamson Strum
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    ABSTRACT: A 77-year-old woman with achalasia was evaluated for intermittent dysphagia, regurgitation, and recurrent esophageal yeast infections over the past 11 years, as well as a 7.7-kg (17-lb) weight loss over the past 3 years. An esophagram revealed an epiphrenic diverticulum.
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2510.
  • Peter A Ubel
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    ABSTRACT: While rule revisions to reduce geographic disparities in U.S. organ distribution are debated, some patients have taken it upon themselves to travel to areas where organs are more abundant, and some companies have been created to enable more patients to follow suit.
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2450-2.
  • Marc Dewey, Peter Schlattmann
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: Smith-Bindman et al. (Sept. 18 issue)(1) address the diagnosis of nephrolithiasis. However, their patients presented with pain, a symptom of obstructive ureterolithiasis, not simple nephrolithiasis. A meta-analysis(2) reported a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 95% for the detection of obstructive ureterolithiasis with computed tomography (CT). Smith-Bindman et al. report that CT has a much lower sensitivity and specificity for nephrolithiasis - 86% and 53%, respectively. In their article, the authors provide no images and no discussion of the diagnostic criteria for diagnosis of stones that would allow the reader to understand this anomaly. According to . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2529-31.
  • Lovely Chhabra, David H Spodick
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: Mayosi and colleagues (Sept. 18 issue)(1) found a lack of efficacy of Mycobacterium indicus pranii in the large, clinical Investigation of the Management of Pericarditis (IMPI) trial involving patients presumed to have tuberculous pericarditis. In addition, an increase in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cancers was observed in patients who received injections of M. indicus pranii. Some reasons for the observations with M. indicus pranii in this study would be useful. M. indicus pranii is a saprophytic bacterium reported to have immunomodulatory abilities.(2),(3) It stimulates the toll-like receptor pathway and induces a number of inflammatory cytokines. . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2531-5.
  • Tarun W Dasari, Marco Paliotta
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    ABSTRACT: A healthy 23-year-old woman was referred for evaluation of a murmur and an increasingly pulsatile neck mass, first noted 2 years before presentation. Physical examination revealed a prominent pulsation in the right side of the neck, shown in a video, and an early diastolic murmur.
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):e38.
  • Eduardo K U N Fonseca, Aécio F T de Góis
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: In the review of microcytic anemia by DeLoughery (Oct. 2 issue),(1) two commonly encountered causes of microcytic anemia and iron deficiency were not mentioned: chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and the long-term use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs).(2),(3) H. pylori is known to consume iron and thereby makes dietary iron unavailable for absorption.(4) Gastric acid is required for effective absorption of dietary iron, and PPIs, which inhibit acid production, may impair absorption.(2) It is our practice to consider screening all patients with iron-deficiency anemia for H. pylori infection and to consider withholding PPI therapy while patients are . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2535-7.
  • Phillip B Shaffer, Mary P Borgess
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: Smith-Bindman et al. (Sept. 18 issue)(1) address the diagnosis of nephrolithiasis. However, their patients presented with pain, a symptom of obstructive ureterolithiasis, not simple nephrolithiasis. A meta-analysis(2) reported a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 95% for the detection of obstructive ureterolithiasis with computed tomography (CT). Smith-Bindman et al. report that CT has a much lower sensitivity and specificity for nephrolithiasis - 86% and 53%, respectively. In their article, the authors provide no images and no discussion of the diagnostic criteria for diagnosis of stones that would allow the reader to understand this anomaly. According to . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2529-31.
  • Sergio Bonini, Hans-Georg Eichler, Noël Wathion, Guido Rasi
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    ABSTRACT: Guided by public health interests, the European Medicines Agency has set new standards for clinical trial data transparency by adopting a 2010 policy on access to documents and a 2014 policy on publication of clinical data for medicinal products for human use.
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2452-5.
  • Tine Jess
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    ABSTRACT: The causes of obesity, other than genes and environment, are poorly understood. A recent study showed that exposure of mice to antibiotics in early life induced lasting effects on body composition owing to alteration of the intestinal microbiota.
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2526-8.
  • Daniela Lamas, Lisa Rosenbaum
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    ABSTRACT: The U.S. transplant community is debating an approach to reducing geographic disparities in organ distribution: redrawing the liver-allocation map to reduce disparities among patients with similar disease severity, without increasing deaths on the waiting list.
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2447-50.
  • Rajesh T Gandhi, Tarik K Alkasab, Valentina Nardi, John A Branda
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    ABSTRACT: A 57-year-old man with HIV infection was seen in the emergency department because of pain in the left inguinal region. CT of the abdomen and pelvis revealed enlarged lymph nodes with areas of necrosis. A diagnostic test was performed.
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014; 371(26):2511-20.
  • Deborah A Zarin, Tony Tse, Jerry Sheehan
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    ABSTRACT: Broad access to information about clinical trials and their findings is critical for advancing medicine, promoting public health, and fulfilling ethical obligations to human volunteers.(1) Traditional methods of information dissemination (e.g., presentations and publication) may nevertheless leave distortions and gaps in the knowledge base because the results of many trials are not published.(2)-(4) Title VIII of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA)(5) addressed some of these concerns by requiring the registration and submission of summary results information to ClinicalTrials.gov for certain clinical trials of drugs (including biologic products) and devices. The Department of Health . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014;
  • Jeffrey M Drazen, Edward W Campion, Eric J Rubin M D, Stephen Morrissey, Lindsey R Baden
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    ABSTRACT: It has been a year since the first case associated with the current Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa was identified and just over 8 months since we first started reporting on the outbreaks that stemmed from that patient in Guinea.(1) Today's posts at NEJM.org include an anniversary update on the fight against Ebola virus disease (EVD).(2) It is painfully clear that the world's initial handling of this dangerous outbreak was far from optimal, but we now appear to be making progress in the battle. This headway is evidenced by the observations that the rate of appearance of new cases . . .
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/2014;