Social Work in Mental Health (Soc Work Ment Health )

Description

Social Work in Mental Health will publish quality articles on clinical practice, education, research, collaborative relationships, mental health policy, and the delivery of mental health care services. Under the editorship of Gary Rosenberg, PhD, and Andrew Weissman, PhD, two respected leaders in social work in the United States, the journal will feature special issues, volumes devoted to a single pertinent mental health theme, editorials on controversial themes in social work in mental health care, timely book reviews, and a "Brief Communication" section of short, cogently written communications that may be of clinical or research interest to the field. This scholarly, creative, and lively journal presents material valuable to social workers in all sectors of mental health care. It is devoted to social work theory, practice, and administration in a wide variety of mental health care settings. Social Work in Mental Health will help you improve your practice in these areas, demonstrating the vital role of social services in mental health care delivery systems. As a practitioner, administrator, teacher, researcher, or student in social work involved in the delivery of mental health care services, you'll stay up to date on developments in the profession as you study leadership, management, education, and ethical issues in the field. Social Work in Mental Health will also improve your knowledge and understanding of specific mental health care topics as you study the role of social work in areas such as: managed care; empirically based interventions; alcohol treatment; short term treatment models; depression; genetics; mentally ill chemical abusers; HIV/AIDS; schizophrenia; psychoeducation; women's mental health issues; clinical treatment innovations; violence; children's mental health problems; creative adolescent mental health programs.

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  • Website
    Social Work in Mental Health website
  • Other titles
    Social work in mental health (Online), Social work in mental health
  • ISSN
    1533-2993
  • OCLC
    45706069
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Social Work in Mental Health 01/2015;
  • Social Work in Mental Health 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Few studies offer guidance on best practice for social workers in assessment and recommendation of treatment services for specialty mental health services within a system of care (SOC). This study examined factors associated with service assignment among a population of children and youth (N = 1,270) entering a federally funded system of care program referred to specialty mental health services. Logistic regression was used to examine the likelihood of children and youth determined in need of varying levels of care coordination services based on child factors and referral source. Older youth, youth with internalizing problems, and those referred from mental health compared to juvenile justice and schools were significantly more likely determined in need of more intensive care coordination services. Race was not significantly associated with level of care determination. Findings suggest that differences exist in level of care determination for children entering system of care referred by the juvenile justice system and related services and schools. Social workers and providers need to be aware of these differences in order to properly screen children for internalizing problems when referred by sources other than mental health.
    Social Work in Mental Health 06/2013; Forthcoming.
  • Social Work in Mental Health 04/2013; 11(3).
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    ABSTRACT: In this article, the author argues for the need for students to have opportunities to dialogue with service users in social work education. Through such conversations spaces for critical-reflection are created in which individual, team and professional discourses can be safely critiqued among a community of learners. Within professional courses of study the constructed nature of distinctions between service users and the professionals who ‘treat’ them become apparent when consumers and their families tell their narratives of recovery to an audience of allied health students who are in their first year of hospital-based practice. The author proposes that social workers need to take a critical-reflective stance in relation to the teams and the professional discourses they work within. A critical-reflective approach enables students to analyse their practice within their organisation's policies to look beyond the boundaries while paradoxically learning to work within them. This perspective is evoked by the use of service user narratives in educational programmes of professional development. The implications for integrating consumer perspectives in social work education are discussed.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Crisis intervention training has become a popular strategy to educate first responders about mental illness and techniques to safely and effectively de-escalate individuals experiencing a mental health crisis. This paper presents outcomes of the first four years of a Crisis Intervention Team program in St. Louis, Missouri. Findings of this evaluation suggest that the Crisis Intervention Team program is effective in diverting individuals in crisis to treatment.
    Social Work in Mental Health 11/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: 192 Vietnamese-American high school students (mean age = 15.4 years) were surveyed about important non-parental adults (VIPs) in their lives (e.g., uncles, teachers) and provided information about them (e.g., perceived supportiveness, engagement in problem behavior). Correlational and regression analyses indicated that VIPs contributed significantly to adolescents' cultural and socioemotional adjustment including depressed mood, self-esteem, problem behavior, school attitudes, and involvement in American and Vietnamese cultures. Most of these contributions remained significant after controlling for parents' and friends' effects on these outcomes. Analyses of interactions showed that the effects of VIPs differed for males and females. The results demonstrate the critical role of VIPs in Vietnamese American adolescent development. Implication for social work practice is discussed.
    Social Work in Mental Health 07/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Background: While models for conveying a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are beginning to emerge in the literature, relatively little is known about how a diagnosis is delivered and experienced by families.Objectives: This study examined the experiences of parents receiving a diagnosis of ASD for their child.Methods: Based on a phenomenological approach, a purposive sample of 10 parents (8 mothers, 2 fathers) participated in in-depth, semi-structured interviews aimed at understanding their diagnostic experience.Results: Findings revealed a lengthy, complex and discouraging assessment and diagnostic process that resulted in parents feeling confused, disempowered and overwhelmed. Identified themes associated with diagnosis comprised: initial recognition that ‘something is different’; waiting, worry and uncertainty; preference for diagnostic information in a hopeful tenor; feeling overwhelmed with information and emotion at diagnosis; processes of grief, relief and making sense of ASD; and becoming an advocate, expert and case manager.Discussion: The importance of empowering parents by providing support, information, resources and tools for navigating the complexity of service/treatments at the time of diagnosis was emphasized within a parent-professional partnership. A protocol for practice, focused on enhanced parental empowerment, is offered including specific clinical guidelines (what to share, how to share and when to share) for sharing a diagnosis of ASD.
    Social Work in Mental Health 07/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Social workers constitute a high proportion of mental health professionals and a high percentage of social workers provide mental health care. Thus, psychiatric diagnoses and pharmaceutical interventions are relevant for many social workers. This paper reviews the rise in the diagnoses of Bipolar spectrum disorders for both children and adults. It considers the safety of antipsychotic medications, a mainstay of treatment for children and adults, which, in addition to other well-documented negative side effects, have recently been shown to decrease brain volume by a significant percent. These issues are particularly relevant for children in the foster care system.
    Social Work in Mental Health 05/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: This paper illuminates the use of developmental action research (DAR) to create midline theory guiding intervention into homelessness among older African American women. The authors identify the usefulness of DAR in designing, developing, and refining interventions to help participants get and stay out of homelessness. A multi-modal intervention project, the Leaving Homelessness Intervention Research Project (LHIRP), demonstrates how DAR and midline theory were used to frame an understanding of how homelessness occurs among older African American women. LHIRP is offered as an example of how social work practitioners, researchers, and participants can collaborate to address homelessness through team-based collaborative action. It also demonstrates how a number of promising interventions can be best undertaken to address this problem. The authors then illustrate how LHIRP formulates theory to guide the design and development of subsequent intervention models and procedures.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Developments in psychosis-risk assessment over recent decades have made it possible to identify a “clinical high risk” population that has a substantially elevated likelihood of developing a psychotic disorder relative to the general population. The expanding body of research on the clinical high risk population has identified risk and protective factors from a variety of environmental sources ranging from the immediate, such as social function and daily hassles, to the more distal, such as mental health policy and societal stigma. An ecological model of the psychosis-risk state would facilitate an understanding of the complex and interactive processes that contribute to the attenuated psychotic symptoms and decline in function that characterize someone as being at clinical high risk. The present paper reviews clinical high risk research on social factors operating at various levels within the ecological systems framework, as defined by Bronfenbrenner (1977). An ecological model allows integration across levels of social influences that may directly or indirectly serve as risk or protective factors for the individual, thereby contributing to the onset or prevention of a full psychotic disorder.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The current study assessed the ability of siblings of patients diagnosed with a mental disorder on a measure of emotional intelligence, the Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (Mayer et al., 2002. Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT): User's Manual. Multi-Health Systems, Inc., Toronto, Ontario).Method: 30 siblings of patients diagnosed with a mental disorder by a mental health professional (mostly schizophrenia and bipolar disorders) completed the MSCEIT. Their performance was compared against the population mean of 100 (based on a sample of 5,000 participants) on different abilities of emotional intelligence.Results: Siblings performed statistically better than the population on Experiential EIQ, the ability to perceive, to respond, and to manipulate emotional input without necessarily understanding it, and statistically worse than the population mean on Strategic EIQ, the ability to understand and manage emotions without necessarily perceiving or fully experiencing them.Conclusions: Experiential EIQ appears to be a strength while Strategic EIQ appears to be a weakness for siblings. Implications for therapy are discussed.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: This article reviews literature over the past twenty years concerning female veterans and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The literature identified sexual trauma, pre-military sexual trauma, combat exposure, substance misuse, and gender difference in the development of PTSD among female veterans from the Gulf War to the current conflicts. Also, incorporated in the review are evidence-based and other promising treatment options for female veterans suffering from PTSD. Based on the review, female veterans experience higher rates of military sexual trauma and much of the current research on female veteran related PTSD is focused on sexual trauma that occurs while in the military. As the number of females serving in the military grows, there needs to be a continued effort in understanding the multiple issues they experience before, during, and after their time in the military. Researchers need to continue to address sexual traumas, the disparity in the diagnosis of PTSD, effective treatment options, and further understand the dynamics of comorbidity of other mental health disorders with PTSD. In addition, more research needs to be conducted on how trauma and PTSD impacts family and occupational functioning for female veterans after both their return from operational deployment and completion of military service.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012; 10(3):233-252.
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    ABSTRACT: Long wait lists and service attrition suggest the mental health needs of children and adolescents need responsive, effective interventions. Through a community-university partnership, a pilot project called the Change Clinic was developed as a brief counseling alternative to traditional interventions for children, adolescents, and families. A social constructionist perspective influenced all aspects of service delivery and the content of the mixed method client outcome measures. Quantitative and qualitative findings provided sufficient promising evidence to support the continuation and expansion of the Change Clinic. The Change Clinic has transferable potential for child and adolescent mental health services nationally and internationally.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes a process evaluation of a mental health Crisis/Respite service in Ontario, Canada. Service users, referring organizations, and staff members were interviewed and surveyed about their experiences with the service. All three stakeholder groups identified the service as much needed, identifying its role as an alternative to more intrusive forms of crisis support, as a transition place, a safe place, and a place to take a break and work toward goals. As with any program, there are challenges in its development, some of which, the authors argue, are representative of the interaction of two very different approaches to providing mental health services that currently influence our mental health systems.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012; 10(1):34-52.
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    ABSTRACT: Firearms have been noted as a risk factor in youth suicide, but this has not necessarily translated effectively into the clinical setting. There is little information from the mental health field on firearm counseling interventions with parents of adolescents. The intent of this study was to uncover adolescent mental health clinicians' endorsements of specific messaging strategies on firearm access and safety counseling geared toward parents of depressed and suicidal adolescents. A total of 24 clinicians from a rural area took part in a focus group study. As part of the focus group, mental health counselors looked at six short paragraphs that phrased counseling parents on suicide and firearms. They were asked to identify three sentences across these paragraphs that they felt would be useful with parents of depressed or suicidal adolescents in counseling. Results found 66 responses that resulted in the recognition of 16 common statements across participants. The frequency of statements was examined, qualitatively analyzed and grouped according to messaging concept. The results indicated that the sentences the counselors identified fit into five concepts: Risk, Empathy, Impulsivity, Lethal Means Restriction Counseling, and Parental Responsibility. The present study provides insight into message strategies identified as helpful in engaging parents in discussions of firearms when the risk of adolescent suicide is present.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012; 10(1):72-88.
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    ABSTRACT: Social workers intervene with clients with co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders in their daily practice. Many social workers may not have a full understanding of the theories about why people have co-occurring disorders. The theory that social workers are most familiar with, the self-medication model, may not best explain the client's experience and may cause social workers to overlook the needs of some clients. In this article, the four main models used to explain why people have co-occurring disorders are examined, empirical literature related to each model is critiqued, and implications for practice, policy, and research are discussed.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;