Social Work in Mental Health (Soc Work Ment Health )

Description

Social Work in Mental Health will publish quality articles on clinical practice, education, research, collaborative relationships, mental health policy, and the delivery of mental health care services. Under the editorship of Gary Rosenberg, PhD, and Andrew Weissman, PhD, two respected leaders in social work in the United States, the journal will feature special issues, volumes devoted to a single pertinent mental health theme, editorials on controversial themes in social work in mental health care, timely book reviews, and a "Brief Communication" section of short, cogently written communications that may be of clinical or research interest to the field. This scholarly, creative, and lively journal presents material valuable to social workers in all sectors of mental health care. It is devoted to social work theory, practice, and administration in a wide variety of mental health care settings. Social Work in Mental Health will help you improve your practice in these areas, demonstrating the vital role of social services in mental health care delivery systems. As a practitioner, administrator, teacher, researcher, or student in social work involved in the delivery of mental health care services, you'll stay up to date on developments in the profession as you study leadership, management, education, and ethical issues in the field. Social Work in Mental Health will also improve your knowledge and understanding of specific mental health care topics as you study the role of social work in areas such as: managed care; empirically based interventions; alcohol treatment; short term treatment models; depression; genetics; mentally ill chemical abusers; HIV/AIDS; schizophrenia; psychoeducation; women's mental health issues; clinical treatment innovations; violence; children's mental health problems; creative adolescent mental health programs.

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  • Website
    Social Work in Mental Health website
  • Other titles
    Social work in mental health (Online), Social work in mental health
  • ISSN
    1533-2993
  • OCLC
    45706069
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Few studies offer guidance on best practice for social workers in assessment and recommendation of treatment services for specialty mental health services within a system of care (SOC). This study examined factors associated with service assignment among a population of children and youth (N = 1,270) entering a federally funded system of care program referred to specialty mental health services. Logistic regression was used to examine the likelihood of children and youth determined in need of varying levels of care coordination services based on child factors and referral source. Older youth, youth with internalizing problems, and those referred from mental health compared to juvenile justice and schools were significantly more likely determined in need of more intensive care coordination services. Race was not significantly associated with level of care determination. Findings suggest that differences exist in level of care determination for children entering system of care referred by the juvenile justice system and related services and schools. Social workers and providers need to be aware of these differences in order to properly screen children for internalizing problems when referred by sources other than mental health.
    Social Work in Mental Health 06/2013; Forthcoming.
  • Social Work in Mental Health 04/2013; 11(3).
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes a process evaluation of a mental health Crisis/Respite service in Ontario, Canada. Service users, referring organizations, and staff members were interviewed and surveyed about their experiences with the service. All three stakeholder groups identified the service as much needed, identifying its role as an alternative to more intrusive forms of crisis support, as a transition place, a safe place, and a place to take a break and work toward goals. As with any program, there are challenges in its development, some of which, the authors argue, are representative of the interaction of two very different approaches to providing mental health services that currently influence our mental health systems.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012; 10(1):34-52.
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    ABSTRACT: Long wait lists and service attrition suggest the mental health needs of children and adolescents need responsive, effective interventions. Through a community-university partnership, a pilot project called the Change Clinic was developed as a brief counseling alternative to traditional interventions for children, adolescents, and families. A social constructionist perspective influenced all aspects of service delivery and the content of the mixed method client outcome measures. Quantitative and qualitative findings provided sufficient promising evidence to support the continuation and expansion of the Change Clinic. The Change Clinic has transferable potential for child and adolescent mental health services nationally and internationally.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Social workers intervene with clients with co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders in their daily practice. Many social workers may not have a full understanding of the theories about why people have co-occurring disorders. The theory that social workers are most familiar with, the self-medication model, may not best explain the client's experience and may cause social workers to overlook the needs of some clients. In this article, the four main models used to explain why people have co-occurring disorders are examined, empirical literature related to each model is critiqued, and implications for practice, policy, and research are discussed.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Firearms have been noted as a risk factor in youth suicide, but this has not necessarily translated effectively into the clinical setting. There is little information from the mental health field on firearm counseling interventions with parents of adolescents. The intent of this study was to uncover adolescent mental health clinicians' endorsements of specific messaging strategies on firearm access and safety counseling geared toward parents of depressed and suicidal adolescents. A total of 24 clinicians from a rural area took part in a focus group study. As part of the focus group, mental health counselors looked at six short paragraphs that phrased counseling parents on suicide and firearms. They were asked to identify three sentences across these paragraphs that they felt would be useful with parents of depressed or suicidal adolescents in counseling. Results found 66 responses that resulted in the recognition of 16 common statements across participants. The frequency of statements was examined, qualitatively analyzed and grouped according to messaging concept. The results indicated that the sentences the counselors identified fit into five concepts: Risk, Empathy, Impulsivity, Lethal Means Restriction Counseling, and Parental Responsibility. The present study provides insight into message strategies identified as helpful in engaging parents in discussions of firearms when the risk of adolescent suicide is present.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012; 10(1):72-88.
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    ABSTRACT: Ensuring access to appropriate treatment for children and adolescents with mental health needs is a major policy concern. Recent legislation in the form of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA) offers hope for mental health care to a large number of families; however, the lack of a federal definition of mental illness and state differences in coverage, often excluding children's diagnoses, are major limitations in coverage that perhaps might not meet the needs of youth with serious emotional disturbances. Implications of this parity legislation for children and youth are discussed with a particular focus on children and youth with Severe Emotional Disturbance.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012; 10(1):12-33.
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    ABSTRACT: This pilot study tested the feasibility and receptivity of a family psychoeducation protocol for Chinese American adult schizophrenic patients and their caregivers. Although family psychoeducation had been proven a robust intervention, little empirical evidence is available on minority groups in the U.S. This ethnically sensitive treatment adapted to Chinese immigrants had a shorter six-month treatment and involved both multifamily group for caregivers and single family group for individual families. Twelve families were recruited, nine in the intervention group and three in the comparison group. Four waves of data were collected at baseline, three-month, termination and three-month follow-up. Most changes in outcome measures at termination and follow-up for the intervention group compared to baseline and relative to the comparison group were in the expected direction. Patient symptomatology and quality of life, and caregiver knowledge of the illness, treatment and community resources, and social support improved significantly. The protocol was found to be well received by the participants. Various considerations in terms of format, structure, duration proved to serve its purpose. However, flexibility in carrying out the protocol in order to cater for the specific needs of the families and their circumstance was found to be of paramount importance.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Background: While models for conveying a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are beginning to emerge in the literature, relatively little is known about how a diagnosis is delivered and experienced by families.Objectives: This study examined the experiences of parents receiving a diagnosis of ASD for their child.Methods: Based on a phenomenological approach, a purposive sample of 10 parents (8 mothers, 2 fathers) participated in in-depth, semi-structured interviews aimed at understanding their diagnostic experience.Results: Findings revealed a lengthy, complex and discouraging assessment and diagnostic process that resulted in parents feeling confused, disempowered and overwhelmed. Identified themes associated with diagnosis comprised: initial recognition that ‘something is different’; waiting, worry and uncertainty; preference for diagnostic information in a hopeful tenor; feeling overwhelmed with information and emotion at diagnosis; processes of grief, relief and making sense of ASD; and becoming an advocate, expert and case manager.Discussion: The importance of empowering parents by providing support, information, resources and tools for navigating the complexity of service/treatments at the time of diagnosis was emphasized within a parent-professional partnership. A protocol for practice, focused on enhanced parental empowerment, is offered including specific clinical guidelines (what to share, how to share and when to share) for sharing a diagnosis of ASD.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Undertaking qualitative developmental research for the purposes of designing a prototype intergenerational program, the authors offer ten assertions concerning promising practices. The authors undertook an analysis of 47 web-based portrayals of intergenerational programs and used web-based documents that described those programs to further illuminate promising practices. Using thematic analysis of program web content, affinity coding, and dialogic interpretation the authors illuminated the programs'; salient properties and qualities, and formulated and refined their assertions about the distinctiveness of intergenerational programs.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: This article reports parents' perspectives on access to mental health services for their children enrolled in a state children's health insurance program (CHIP). Little has been published about mental health services utilization in states' CHIP programs. Focus groups with parents yielded many contextual factors, confirming previous reports about the importance of the primary care interface and cultural competence. In addition the findings pointed to the importance of taking seriously parents' perception of severity of the child's problem, reducing administrative barriers to accessing treatment, promoting education about mental health to the community, and eliciting regular input from parents about system performance.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: A recent focus on Family-Centered Care (FCC) in mental health has resulted in a variety of recommendations designed to increase family involvement in caring for relatives with mental health issues. Studies indicate that family members require collaboration, information, and support from the mental health system and its providers, but confidentiality concerns, funding limitations, and discrimination often prevent such needs from being met. A qualitative, exploratory study using in-person interviews has been implemented to consider how family members describe and understand their experiences with the mental health system. A critical, Foucauldian analysis is applied to the data to expose hidden systems of domination and oppression that may be contributing to discriminatory attitudes and practices which interfere with family involvement. Results of this research reiterate those found in the FCC literature; however, family members in this study seem hesitant to identify discrimination as a primary obstacle to FCC. It appears that complex processes may be at work that elicit the participation of family members in the reproduction of discrimination by interfering with their ability to recognize and resist its multiple and subtle forms. Recommendations for resistance include cultivating a critical awareness to disrupt dominant assumptions that inform discriminatory attitudes and practices.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: This article reports on a study which explored the extent to which social workers employed by The Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental Health (known as Forensicare) identified their practice as specialist, with distinct and distinctive skills and knowledge, their role differentiated from other fields of social work and the implications of this for the social work profession. As a group of social workers they provide services to mentally ill offenders in prison, to inpatients in the secure psychiatric hospital and after their release into the community, and provide assessments and psychiatric reports for court. A cooperative enquiry approach, using interview and focus groups, gathered information about how the social workers defined and described forensic social work and how social workers could be prepared for work in this practice domain. The social workers reported that the complex needs and great vulnerability of forensic clients meant they needed not only knowledge of individual functioning but also how to deal with a range of other systems to negotiate with legal and other services and advocate for clients and they believed social work education needed to provide a distinctive graduate pathway for this practice domain which acknowledges its unique and specialist identity.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Individuals who are HIV-positive may experience various types of stressors. Research shows that negative appraisals and avoidance coping in response to stress are associated with less adaptive functioning. As an alternative, acceptance may be related to better well-being. Several investigators have shown that acceptance is associated with healthier outcomes for various medical populations. However, acceptance has not been empirically examined within HIV-positive individuals. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationships among acceptance, avoidance coping, and multiple aspects of psychological functioning in military veterans receiving HIV-related care at a veterans affairs (VA) healthcare system. Seventy-six military veterans who were HIV-positive and receiving care at the VA Boston healthcare system completed a battery of questionnaires assessing the variables of interest. Results indicated that acceptance was related to better mental health variables. To continue this line of research, future investigations may want to replicate these findings with other HIV-populations, examine potential mechanisms that drive the relationships between acceptance and better mental health functioning, and study the impact of acceptance-based interventions.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Social workers constitute a high proportion of mental health professionals and a high percentage of social workers provide mental health care. Thus, psychiatric diagnoses and pharmaceutical interventions are relevant for many social workers. This paper reviews the rise in the diagnoses of Bipolar spectrum disorders for both children and adults. It considers the safety of antipsychotic medications, a mainstay of treatment for children and adults, which, in addition to other well-documented negative side effects, have recently been shown to decrease brain volume by a significant percent. These issues are particularly relevant for children in the foster care system.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: This paper illuminates the use of developmental action research (DAR) to create midline theory guiding intervention into homelessness among older African American women. The authors identify the usefulness of DAR in designing, developing, and refining interventions to help participants get and stay out of homelessness. A multi-modal intervention project, the Leaving Homelessness Intervention Research Project (LHIRP), demonstrates how DAR and midline theory were used to frame an understanding of how homelessness occurs among older African American women. LHIRP is offered as an example of how social work practitioners, researchers, and participants can collaborate to address homelessness through team-based collaborative action. It also demonstrates how a number of promising interventions can be best undertaken to address this problem. The authors then illustrate how LHIRP formulates theory to guide the design and development of subsequent intervention models and procedures.
    Social Work in Mental Health 01/2012;

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