Veterinary Surgery (Vet Surg )

Publisher: American College of Veterinary Surgeons; European College of Veterinary Surgeons, Blackwell Publishing

Description

Veterinary Surgery is a bimonthly journal focusing on continuing education within the broad field of veterinary surgery. Coverage includes surgical techniques, management of the surgical patient, diagnostic aids, infections, advances in metabolism, veterinary research and the history of the specialty.

  • Impact factor
    1.24
  • 5-year impact
    1.72
  • Cited half-life
    8.80
  • Immediacy index
    0.07
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.45
  • Website
    Veterinary Surgery website
  • Other titles
    Veterinary surgery (Online), Veterinary surgery, VS
  • ISSN
    1532-950X
  • OCLC
    45552058
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Blackwell Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Some journals impose embargoes typically of 6 or 12 months, occasionally of 24 months
    • no listing of affected journals available as yet
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's server, institutional server or subject-based server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement ("The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com")
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'Blackwell Publishing' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • Stephanie L Shaver, Philipp D Mayhew, Michele A Steffey, Geraldine B Hunt, Kelli N Mayhew, William T N Culp
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To describe surgical techniques for multiple port laparoscopic splenectomy (MLS) in dogs and report short-term outcome. Retrospective case series. Dogs (n = 10) with naturally occurring splenic disease. Medical records (March 2012-March 2013) of dogs that had MLS were reviewed. Data retrieved included signalment, weight, clinical signs, physical examination findings, preoperative laboratory and ultrasonographic findings, port number, size, and location, patient positioning, additional procedures performed, surgical duration, histopathologic diagnosis, duration of hospitalization, and perioperative complications. Ten dogs (median weight, 28.7 kg; range, 20.2-46.0 kg) had MLS using a 3 or 4 port technique and a vessel-sealing device for tissue dissection along the splenic hilus. Dog positioning varied because of additional laparoscopic or laparoscopic-assisted procedures including adrenalectomy (n = 2), ovariectomy (1), gastropexy (1), and intestinal resection and anastomosis (1). Conversion to an open approach was necessary in 1 dog because of inadequate visibility caused by omental adhesions. One dog had hemorrhage from an omental vessel, but open conversion was not required. MLS was associated with little perioperative morbidity and few complications in this cohort of dogs and may be a reasonable option for surgical management of dogs requiring elective splenectomy. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.
    Veterinary Surgery 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate examiner variability in a superficial skin marker model of canine stifle kinematics. Experimental. Six clinically normal dogs. Dogs had 11 retroreflective markers fixed to the skin on the right hindlimb. Dogs were trotted 5 times through the calibrated testing space and this was repeated on 4 different testing days. Examiner A applied all markers to a dog and collected 6 good trials for analysis. The markers were then removed and Examiner B immediately repeated the process on the same dog. This was repeated for each dog on the 4 testing days. The dogs were trotted at a velocity of 1.70-2.10 m/s through the testing space to obtain the dynamic data sets. Comparisons were performed with Fourier analysis and Generalized Indicator Function Analysis (GIFA). Significance was set at P < .05 for all comparisons. Fourier analysis and GIFA found differences within and between examiners. Fourier analysis found no differences in sagittal and transverse planes for the experienced (A) and novice examiner (B), respectively. Fourier analysis detected fewer differences for the experienced examiner (A). Variability occurs within and between examiners using the same kinematic model. Transverse and frontal plane kinematics produce variable results between examiners. Prior experience with the model reduces the amount of variability and results in consistent and repeatable sagittal plane kinematic data collection. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.
    Veterinary Surgery 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective Evaluate the effect of peritoneal lift location and tensile force on peritoneal volume.Study DesignComplete randomized block design.AnimalsEleven fresh canine cadavers.Methods Cadavers underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans after each treatment; 1) no lift, 2) umbilical lift with 15% body weight (BW) tension, 3) umbilical lift with 20% BW, 4) umbilical lift with 25% BW, 5) caudal lift with 15% BW, and 6) both umbilical and caudal lift with 15% BW shared equally between devices (dual lift). Isobaric pneumoperitoneal volume, instrument working distances, and transverse measures were calculated and normalized for each dog and compared across treatments.ResultsIncreasing tensile force created a correspondingly larger pneumoperitoneal volume for the umbilical lift (0.34–0.40 total abdominal volume). Dual lifting created a larger pneumoperitoneal volume than either location alone at the same tension (0.39 total abdominal volume). Increasing lift tensions increased working distances, except to caudal abdominal structures. Increasing lift tensions at the umbilical location reduced the transverse diameter of the abdomen at the level of the kidney (0.92–0.86 total abdominal volume) and increased the transverse diameter at the midperitoneum (1.0–1.05 total abdominal volume).Conclusions Larger isobaric penumoperitoneal volumes are produced with increased tensile force, or with dual lifting at lower force. A caudal lift leads to a small pneumoperitoneal volume but equivalent working space to caudal abdominal structures. Using an umbilical lift with moderate tensile force is preferable, providing good visualization and working space. Caudal lifting may be utilized to access caudal abdominal structures.
    Veterinary Surgery 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To describe the frequency and extent of complications associated with lateral caudal axial pattern flaps used to cover large traumatic or excision skin defects on the dorsum, gluteal, and perineal region in 13 dogs.Study DesignCase series.AnimalsThirteen client-owned dogs.Methods Medical records from 8 institutions were reviewed for dogs treated with a lateral caudal axial pattern flap, including cases in which the procedure was combined with other reconstructive techniques. The flap length relative to the tail length, location of tail skin incision, size and cause of the defect, and short- and long-term complications were recorded.ResultsThirteen dogs were included, 11 with tumors and 2 with traumatic skin loss. The mean estimated length of the flap relative to tail length was 51% (range 33–70%). Four dogs had wound complications. This included 2 dogs with minor postoperative wound complications (mild distal dehiscence) that did not require surgical revision and 2 dogs with major complications that required surgical revision. Two of these 4 dogs had distal flap necrosis, one was revised surgically and one was managed conservatively. In these 2 dogs, the flap length was estimated as 80% and 65% of the tail length, respectively. At 30 days, flaps in all dogs were completely healed. No long-term complications were recorded in any dog. For some dogs, the reconstruction was not obvious, with only the change in hair direction and color noticeable.Conclusion Lateral caudal axial pattern flap is a reconstructive option for gluteal, dorsal, and perineal skin defects in dogs. Distal flap necrosis and dehiscence due to wound infection occurred in 4 dogs that required additional wound care but not always surgical revision.
    Veterinary Surgery 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To describe the clinical experience with standing laryngoplasty in a series of horses mostly nonracing.Study DesignCase series.AnimalsSeventy-one client-owned horses.Methods Medical records (April 2008–February 2014) of horses treated by standing laryngoplasty for abnormal respiratory noise and or poor performance were reviewed. Horses were included if they had a diagnosis of idiopathic right or left recurrent laryngeal neuropathy confirmed by videoendoscopy. All horses underwent a unilateral laryngoplasty with a unilateral or bilateral ventriculectomy or ventriculocordectomy. Follow-up endoscopy was performed in all horses within 24 hours postoperative, in 24 horses at 2-weeks, and in 65 horses at 6 weeks. Late follow-up was obtained from the trainer, owner, or referring veterinarian by telephone.ResultsLaryngoplasty was performed under endoscopic guidance with the horses sedated, and the surgical site was desensitized with local anesthetic solution. Laryngoplasty was completed in all horses and was well tolerated. No hyperabduction was observed. Two horses developed incisional swelling that resolved with drainage only. Late follow-up reported satisfactory improvement in respiration in all but 3 horses.Conclusions Laryngoplasty performed with the horse standing avoids risks associated with general anesthesia and recovery and yields comparable results in nonracing horses, to laryngoplasty performed with the horse anesthetized. This technique reduces cost and allows accurate intraoperative adjustment of the degree of arytenoid abduction.
    Veterinary Surgery 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To (1) describe a modified technique for tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture and (2) report short term outcome and complications.
    Veterinary Surgery 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To report clinical signs, diagnostic imaging findings, and outcome in a dog with traumatic myositis ossificans of the origin of the extensor carpi radialis muscle.
    Veterinary Surgery 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To determine the optimal intramedullary (IM) pin size for open and percutaneous normograde pinning of the distal humerus.
    Veterinary Surgery 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate short- and long-term outcome after medical and surgical management of horses with cecal impaction and to determine reasons for death or euthanasia.
    Veterinary Surgery 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To examine perioperative mortality, long-term survival, causes of death, and prognostic factors for dogs and cats undergoing surgical excision of thymic epithelial tumors (TETs).Study DesignMulti-institutional case series.AnimalsEighty dogs and 32 cats.Methods Follow-up information was obtained for dogs and cats that underwent surgical excision of a TET between 2001 and 2012.ResultsPerioperative mortality was 20% in dogs and 22% in cats. No independent risk factors for perioperative mortality were identified. The estimated median survival time for all dogs was 1.69 years (95% CI 0.56–4.32) and the 1- and 4-year survival rates were 55% (95% CI 44–67) and 44% (95% CI 32–56). The estimated median survival time for all cats was 3.71 years (95% CI 0.56-unestimatable) and the 1- and 4-year survival rates were 70% (95% CI 53–87) and 47% (95% CI 0–100). Of animals that survived to discharge, 42% of dogs and 20% of cats eventually died of TET-related causes. The presence of paraneoplastic syndromes (hazard ratio [HR] 5.78, 95% CI 1.64–20.45, P = .007) or incomplete histologic margins (HR 6.09, 95% CI 1.50–24.72, P = .01) were independently associated with decreased survival in dogs. No significant predictors of survival were identified in cats. Conclusions regarding the effect of chemotherapy or radiation therapy could not be made.Conclusions While there is substantial risk of perioperative death in dogs and cats undergoing surgery for TETs, many animals that survive to discharge have prolonged survival. Survival is significantly decreased in dogs with paraneoplastic syndromes or incomplete histologic margins.
    Veterinary Surgery 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To quantify, using computed tomography (CT), cross-sectional ulnar bone density (UBD), and regional radial bone density (RRBD) at the level of the medial coronoid process (MCP) in elbows with and without medial coronoid process disease (MCPD) and with and without fragmentation of MCP (FCP).Study DesignRetrospective clinical case-control and ex vivo study.Sample PopulationLabrador Retriever elbows (n = 54) and normal cadaveric Greyhound elbows (11) undergoing elbow CT.Materials and Methods Labrador Retriever elbows were divided into 2 groups: (1) clinically unaffected and (2) MCPD-affected elbows. This 2nd group was subdivided based on the presence of a displaced FCP. UBD was measured linearly, in Hounsfield units (HU) across the widest part of the ulna incorporating the MCP. The radial head was divided into 6 zones, with mean RRBD (HU) calculated for each group.ResultsMCPD-affected Labrador Retriever elbows had significantly lower UBD within the MCP with a higher UBD in the cranial ulnar medulla. Lower RRBD was also seen in the radial head adjacent to the MCP in MCPD-affected Labrador Retriever elbows with FCP compared with Labrador Retriever elbows without FCP. Greyhounds had consistently lower RRBD and UBD at the apex of the MCP compared with clinically unaffected Labrador Retriever elbows.Conclusions Our results suggest a caudolateral load-transfer shift through the ulna in MCPD-affected elbow joints, unloading the MCP. Changes in regional radial head bone density suggest that the radial head is involved in the pathogenesis of MCPD.
    Veterinary Surgery 10/2014;
  • Veterinary Surgery 10/2014; 43(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives To assess ultrasound guided transarterial coil placement (UGTACP) for occlusion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and external carotid artery (ECA) in horses.Study DesignCadaveric and in vivo study.AnimalsCadaveric horses (n = 10), healthy horses (3), and 1 clinical case.Methods Cadaveric and in vivo (healthy horses): UGTACP was performed in the caudal part of the ICA and ECA. Coil placement in the rostral part of the ICA was performed blindly and controlled by conventional radiography. No coils were placed in the rostral part of the ECA. Clinical case: UGTACP of the ICA was in a horse with guttural pouch mycosis of the left guttural pouch.ResultsAccurate ultrasound-guided catheterization of the ICA and ECA was performed in all specimens. Ultrasound-guided coil placement was successfully performed in all cases except 1. No complications occurred in the in vivo study. The clinical case fully recovered and returned to its intended use.Conclusions Based on our study, UGTACP of the ICA and ECA caudal part is a feasible alternative to fluoroscopy. An advantage of this technique is the accuracy with which you can catheterize both ICA and ECA and the ability to identify unusual branching at the origin of the ICA. Regarding the rostral part of the ICA, angiographic catheter guidance in this region is probably more precise using fluoroscopy as it is performed blindly. In a clinical situation, combination of US and fluoroscopy guidance can result in reduction of radiation exposure time.
    Veterinary Surgery 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To describe a technique for surgical correction of nephrosplenic entrapment via standing left flank laparotomy.Study DesignCase series.AnimalsHorses (n = 3).Methods Nephrosplenic entrapment was diagnosed by abdominal palpation per rectum in all 3 horses and confirmed by transabdominal ultrasonography in 2 horses. Duration of colic was variable and failed to resolve after medical management, phenylephrine administration, and jogging. With sedation and local analgesia, standing left flank laparotomy using a modified grid approach was performed to correct the entrapment. Follow-up information was obtained by telephone communication with trainers or owners.ResultsNephrosplenic entrapment was successfully corrected in all horses; postoperative fever occurred in 1 horse. Horses were discharged after 48–72 hours and returned to previous use within 30 days.Conclusion Standing flank laparotomy is an alternative for horses with nephrosplenic entrapment unresponsive to medical therapy when general anesthesia and exploratory celiotomy are not an option because of financial constraints or a high anesthetic risk. This approach leads to a favorable outcome, reduces hospital stay and associated costs and leads to a rapid return to function.
    Veterinary Surgery 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To evaluate variation in rima glottidis (RG) area and lack of epiglottic–glottic seal (LEGS) of the canine larynx associated with different suture anchor points in the arytenoid and cricoid cartilages, dissection of the cricoarytenoid joint capsule, section of the interarytenoid band, and disarticulation of the cricothyroid joint.Study DesignExperimental study.AnimalsCadaveric canine larynges (n = 18).Methods Larynges were assigned to 2 groups: group 1 = intact cricothyroid articulation and group 2 = cricothyroid articulation sharply sectioned. In each group, the arytenoid cartilage was lateralized successively as follows: (a) intact cricoarytenoid articulation, (b) cricoarytenoid articulation sharply sectioned, and (c) division of the interarytenoid band. Each variation was performed initially with the suture passed dorsally into the cricoid cartilage then with the suture passed laterally. Each time, the increase of rima glottis area (%) and the LEGS (mm2) were measured.ResultsRima glottis area (RGA): when the suture was placed dorsally, division of the interarytenoid band resulted in a significant increase in RGA compared with groups with an intact band. Laryngeal distortion: when the suture through the cricoid cartilage was dorsal, LEGS increased with section of the cricothyroid articulation, dissection of cricoarytenoid articulation, and division of the interarytenoid band.Conclusion Unilateral arytenoid lateralization results in some degree of LEGS with a misalignment of the epiglottis over the RG. Our results revealed that the optimal RGA associated with the minimal LEGS was obtained with dorsal placement of a cricoarytenoid suture when the cricothyroid joint and the interarytenoid band were intact.
    Veterinary Surgery 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To determine degrees of flexion after arthrodesis of the antebrachiocarpal (ABC) joint, middle carpal (MC), and carpometacarpal (CMC) joints combined (MC/CMC), and carpometacarpal (CMC) joint alone.Study DesignEx vivo study.AnimalsForelimbs (n = 9) from 2- to 10-year-old Quarter Horses (5), Thoroughbred (2), and American Paint Horse (2).Methods Using 2 locking compression plates, 3 partial carpal arthrodesis techniques were performed. Cables and deadweights were connected to limbs and each angle of flexion determined 3 times using a protractor and then averaged. Control measurements were obtained before and after arthrodesis, the techniques randomized with Latin square design. Descriptive data were analyzed with Levene's test, Q-Q plots, ANOVA, and Bonferroni test.ResultsMean ± SD carpal flexion results were: controls 150° ± 8°, CMC arthrodesis 149° ± 9°, MC/CMC arthrodesis 43° ± 7.6°, and ABC arthrodesis 25° ± 6.3°. There was no significant reduction in flexion after a CMC arthrodesis compared with controls (P = .21), but there was after ABC (P < .001) and MC/CMC arthrodesis (P < .001), with the ABC arthrodesis significantly reduced compared with an MC/CMC arthrodesis (P < .001).Conclusions Whereas CMC arthrodesis does not affect carpal flexion, CMC/MC and ABC arthrodesis markedly reduce the degree of carpal flexion.
    Veterinary Surgery 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To compare in geriatric and mature horses the occurrence of short-term complications and short-term outcome associated with complications after colic surgery.Study DesignRetrospective case–control study.Sample PopulationHorses aged ≥20 years (geriatric, n = 78) and 4–15 years (mature non-geriatric, n = 156) that had exploratory celiotomy for colic and survived recovery from general anesthesia.Methods Medical records (2000–2010) of horses that recovered from general anesthesia after colic surgery were reviewed. Postoperative complications evaluated included postoperative reflux (POR), diarrhea, inappetence, fever, leukopenia, incisional infection, incisional dehiscence, thrombophlebitis, colic, repeat celiotomy, pneumonia, and laminitis. Short-term outcome (alive vs. dead at hospital discharge) of geriatric and mature horses with these complications were compared. Data were analyzed using a χ2 or Fisher's exact test or an ANOVA. Level of significance P < .05.ResultsGeriatric horses had higher odds of having a small intestinal strangulating lesion than mature horses. A higher proportion of geriatric horses had POR and inappetence; however, there was no difference in the proportion of geriatric and mature horses with small intestinal strangulating lesions having POR. Short-term outcome with and without complications was similar between the 2 age groups.Conclusion Geriatric and mature horses have similar occurrences of short-term complications and short-term outcomes associated with complications after colic surgery.
    Veterinary Surgery 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To describe the use of a wire snare technique for epiglottic entrapment.Study DesignCase series.AnimalsEight adult horses.Methods Under general anesthesia, a modified mouth gag was placed in the oropharynx. An endoscope was passed through the gag until there was adequate visualization of the entrapped epiglottis. The entrapping mucosa was grasped with bronchoesophageal forceps and pulled rostrally, releasing the epiglottis. A custom snare was passed down the bronchoesophageal forceps to encircle the redundant subepiglottic mucosa. Tension was applied to the entrapping mucosa via the forceps as the obstetric wire was tightened at the base and the redundant mucosa (aryepiglottic fold) was excised.ResultsThe procedure was performed on 8 adult thoroughbred horses. Re-evaluation by endoscopy did not show entrapment in any horse and no horse developed complications or has had problems with performance.Conclusions This technique is a minimally invasive, competitively priced and straightforward method for resection of entrapping subepiglottic mucosa in adult horses.
    Veterinary Surgery 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To (1) describe ultrasound-guided percutaneous introduction of a transarterial angiographic catheter into the common carotid artery (CCA); (2) investigate the feasibility of using angiography of the carotid arteries in the guttural pouch region and assess transarterial coil (TAC) placement into the internal carotid artery (ICA).Study DesignExperimental study.AnimalsHealthy Standardbred horses (n = 6), aged 5–8 years.Methods Six horses had ultrasound-guided percutaneous CCA catheterization and angiography under general anesthesia. Catheterization sites were ultrasonographically evaluated postoperatively. Ten weeks later using the same horses sedated and standing, the same procedure was combined with placement of a TAC in the ICA.ResultsAgitated contrast ultrasonography confirmed successful catheterization of the CCA. Needle puncture and introducer-set penetration of the CCA were the main technical difficulties. Radiography and fluoroscopy confirmed successful angiography and TAC placement. Mild hematoma formation was recorded in 4 of 12 procedures.Conclusion Angiography and TCA placement in the ICA can be safely performed using a percutaneous approach to the CCA under ultrasound guidance, in standing or anesthetized horses. This approach might be used for TAC embolization procedure; however, technical difficulties and hematoma formation can impair the procedure.
    Veterinary Surgery 10/2014;