Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing

Publisher: Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing, Elsevier

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Other titles Journal of vascular nursing (Online), Journal of vascular nursing, Vascular nursing
ISSN 1532-6578
OCLC 45449468
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

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    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
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Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Although much is known about risk factors for VTE, there is failure in administration of appropriate prophylaxis to patients who are at risk for VTE. A paper-based reminder system is considered to be among the most effective methods of improving VTE prophylaxis in hospitalized patients. However, their success relies on choosing an evidence-based institutional guideline and implementation of its recommendations. This study was carried out to detect the extent of application of the institutional guideline (Caprini score risk assessment sheet). The study was carried out in the Jordan University Hospital; 354 patients were enrolled in the study and distributed among the following wards: nonorthopedic surgical (n = 119), medical (n = 220), and surgical orthopedic wards (n = 15). The risk assessment sheet was present in only 47.2% of the patient's' files, and the scores in the files were estimated correctly in only 52.1% of cases. Prophylaxis received by patients matched the recommendation of the Caprini score in 67.1% of the patients. The degree of concordance of the VTE prophylaxis with the Caprini score was 59.9%. This study showed that the institutional guideline was poorly implemented in the hospital. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2015; 33(2). DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2014.11.002
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major public health problem impacting 600,000 people and causing 100,000 deaths annually. Nurses are in a unique position in all health care settings to educate patients and the public to prevent and provide early detection for this devastating complication. A dearth of information exists regarding the knowledge level of those affected. This manuscript presents a study that investigates and quantifies the general public's knowledge level of VTE through a 13-question survey of 325 participants. The results indicate that >70% of the general, nonmedical participants involved in the survey were not familiar with VTE. The findings suggest the need for nurses to consistently and systematically educate patients and the public about VTE to decrease morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2015; 33(2). DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2014.11.001
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Society for Vascular Surgery(®) (SVS) and the American Venous Forum (AVF) published guidelines for the management of venous leg ulcers in August 2014. The goal of this article (Part 2) is to summarize the guidelines that address diagnosis and treatment recommendations published jointly by the SVS and AVF that may affect the nursing practice of vascular nurses. Specific sections include wound evaluation, therapies used on the wound bed itself, compression, and operative or endovascular management. Part 1, published elsewhere in this issue, addressed the epidemiology and financial impact of ulcers, venous anatomy, pathophysiology of venous leg ulcer development, clinical manifestations, and prevention of venous leg ulcers. These 2 parts together provide a comprehensive summary of the joint SVS and AVF guidelines for care of venous leg ulcers. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2015; 33(2). DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2015.01.001
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a complex chronic vascular condition with multifaceted primary and secondary etiologies leading to structural and functional changes in veins and valves and blood flow of the lower legs. As a consequence, a spectrum of clinical manifestations arise, ranging from symptoms of mild leg heaviness and achiness to debilitating pain, and signs of skin changes, such as eczema and hemosiderosis, to nonhealing, heavily draining venous leg ulcers (VLUs). Triggers such as trauma to the skin are responsible for a large majority of VLU recurrences. Diagnostic testing for venous reflux includes ultrasound imaging; unfortunately, there are no diagnostic tests to predict VLUs. The hallmark of treatment of both CVD and VLUs is compression. Leg elevation, exercise, and wound management with dressings and advanced healing technologies that provide an environment conducive to healing should focus on reducing pain, necrotic debris, drainage, and odor, as well as preventing infection. VLUs that become chronic without evidence of healing over a 4-week period respond best to multidisciplinary wound experts within a framework of patient-centered care. Nurses are in key positions to provide early recognition of the signs and symptoms as well as initiate prompt diagnostic and promote early treatment to offset the progression of the disease and improve quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2015; 33(2):36-46. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2015.01.003
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism is defined as an acute venous thrombotic event that targets two disease entities: deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism, or both. The most common site of DVT origin is in the lower extremities, with 50% of patients exhibiting no symptoms. Although anticoagulation is the gold standard for DVT, early clot removal, especially of proximal iliofemoral DVT, is felt to reduce the incidence of postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) by preserving valve function. Up to one-half of all patients with an iliofemoral DVT treated only with anticoagulation subsequently develop long-term complications, including PTS. Beside anticoagulation, DVT treatment options may include pharmaceutical and/or mechanical therapies. Mechanical therapies consist of either endovascular percutaneous catheter-directed (PCD) interventions or open operative thrombectomy. There are several different PCD procedures available, consisting of catheter-directed thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, combination pharmacomechanical devices, and postthrombus extraction (angioplasty and/or stenting). Endovascular therapies in the management of acute iliofemoral DVT are evolving with a variety of devices available to treat this disease entity. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the PCD therapies used when treating patients experiencing an acute iliofemoral DVT along with associated nursing considerations. Off-label device use is not included. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2015; 33(2):47-53. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2015.03.004
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    ABSTRACT: Management of chronic venous leg ulcers (VLU) can be frustrating for both patient and practitioner. It is a significant source of disability and cost of care. Before the practitioner enters the management phase of VLU care, it is helpful to understand the impact of VLUs. Additionally, it is essential to understand the structure and function of the venous system and manifestations indicative of a dysfunction of the system. This article focuses on the epidemiology, structure, and function of the venous system as well as clinical manifestations and prevention. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2015; 33(2):54-9. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2015.01.002
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2015; 33(2):81. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2015.03.003
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2015; 33(2):79-80. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2015.03.002
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 03/2015; 33(1):28-9. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2014.12.005
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 03/2015; 33(1):26-7. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2014.12.002
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 03/2015; 33(1):2-3. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2014.12.004
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 12/2014; 32(4):156. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2014.10.001
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 12/2014; 32(4):157. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2014.09.002
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    ABSTRACT: Few qualitative studies have focused on the experiences of patients post angioplasty. A deep understanding of patient experiences of care and the way a treatment can affect their everyday life is particularly important in chronic disease management. The aim of this study was to explore experiences that patients undergo after angioplasty. Using a phenomenological study design, 15 patients participated in individual, face-to-face, semistructured interviews. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The following core themes emerged from the analysis, which reflect the experiences of patients post angioplasty: (a) Angioplasty is a milestone in the patient's life, (b) living with a mended heart, and (c) psychological distress as an integral part of the patient's life. Participants after angioplasty went through both positive and negative changes in their life. Understanding these experiences is essential to modifying high-risk behaviors while supporting patients through their rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 12/2014; 32(4):144-50. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2014.04.001
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    ABSTRACT: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a slow, progressive disease associated with systemic atherosclerosis. It is common in older adults and often underdiagnosed and undertreated. Primary care providers play a key role in the early detection and treatment of PAD by screening patients in clinic who are symptomatic or at risk for PAD. We implemented a quality improvement project in a rural community health clinic to determine the accuracy of an ankle brachial index (ABI) in a clinic setting compared with ABI done in a hospital vascular laboratory before and after additional skills training for the primary care provider. The cost of an ABI screen in the hospital is considerably more than the screen done in a clinic setting. Improving accuracy in the performance of an ABI screen in a rural clinic to match that done in a hospital laboratory would be a considerable cost-saving initiative. This project demonstrated that additional provider training, clinical experience, and modification of the procedure resulted in increased accuracy of clinic ABIs when matched with the local hospital vascular laboratory screen. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 12/2014; 32(4):137-8. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2014.02.002
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    ABSTRACT: In patients undergoing an amputation secondary to vascular disease, little is known about the timing, mode of delivery, or amount of information needed. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of patients who have undergone a major lower limb amputation as a result of vascular disease, regarding the information healthcare professionals should provide to them during their acute hospital stay. A qualitative study using descriptive methodology was used. Patients were included if they had a major lower limb amputation 1 week to 2 years before the interview. Purposive sampling was used. Sixteen patients participated in a semistructured interview, either face to face or by telephone. Interviews were transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used. Transcripts were coded by two researchers and compared. N-vivo, descriptive and interpretative analyses were used to assess transcribed interviews. Patients stated that there was insufficient information on a variety of topics, including the recovery process, expectations for rehabilitation, and prosthetics. They went on to describe that high pain levels, age, and emotional status affected the delivery of information to them. Patients had different perspectives on timing of information, mode of delivery, and amount of information. An individualized approach to the delivery of information should be considered for patients undergoing major lower limb amputation. Involved healthcare professionals need to take into consideration patient-specific preferences and unique educational needs before the delivery of information. We anticipate that findings from this study will influence the development of an educational program to deliver effective patient centered care in this unique patient population.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 09/2014; 32(3):88-98. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2014.01.002
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    ABSTRACT: The perception of pain is multidimensional, subjective, and unique to each individual and can be influenced by several dimensions of pain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perception of chronic ischemic pain using the descriptors of pain and to rate the main descriptors of chronic pain to people with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The study was conducted in two hospitals in Brazil and consisted of two phases. In phase I, 100 participants with a diagnosis of PAD and chronic pain evaluated 50 descriptors of pain using the Multidimensional Pain Evaluation Scale by the psychophysical method of category estimation using a numerical scale with 11 points. In phase II, 30 participants judged the 10 first descriptors selected in phase I by the psychophysical method of magnitude estimation. The average intensity of chronic ischemic pain was 5.59 ± 3.16. The descriptors of chronic pain with higher scores obtained by the method of category estimation were unpleasant, followed by disturbing, strong, concern, tiring, boring, terrible, painful, sickening, and uncomfortable. By the method of magnitude estimation, the descriptors of pain showing sensitive, affective, and cognitive dimensions were identified by the descriptors terrible, follow by painful, uncomfortable, concern, tiring, sickening, strong, disturbing, boring, and unpleasant. This study showed that the chronic ischemic pain by PAD is associated with multidimensional components of pain.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 09/2014; 32(3):82-7. DOI:10.1016/j.jvn.2014.02.001