Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing

Publisher: Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing, Elsevier

Description

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  • 5-year impact
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  • Other titles
    Journal of vascular nursing (Online), Journal of vascular nursing, Vascular nursing
  • ISSN
    1532-6578
  • OCLC
    45449468
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Voluntary deposit by author of pre-print allowed on Institutions open scholarly website and pre-print servers
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and publisher exists
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PMC after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • Pre-print can not be deposited for The Lancet
  • Classification
    ‚Äč green

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 09/2014; 32(3):125-6.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In patients undergoing an amputation secondary to vascular disease, little is known about the timing, mode of delivery, or amount of information needed. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of patients who have undergone a major lower limb amputation as a result of vascular disease, regarding the information healthcare professionals should provide to them during their acute hospital stay. A qualitative study using descriptive methodology was used. Patients were included if they had a major lower limb amputation 1 week to 2 years before the interview. Purposive sampling was used. Sixteen patients participated in a semistructured interview, either face to face or by telephone. Interviews were transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used. Transcripts were coded by two researchers and compared. N-vivo, descriptive and interpretative analyses were used to assess transcribed interviews. Patients stated that there was insufficient information on a variety of topics, including the recovery process, expectations for rehabilitation, and prosthetics. They went on to describe that high pain levels, age, and emotional status affected the delivery of information to them. Patients had different perspectives on timing of information, mode of delivery, and amount of information. An individualized approach to the delivery of information should be considered for patients undergoing major lower limb amputation. Involved healthcare professionals need to take into consideration patient-specific preferences and unique educational needs before the delivery of information. We anticipate that findings from this study will influence the development of an educational program to deliver effective patient centered care in this unique patient population.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 09/2014; 32(3):88-98.
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2014; 32(2):70-1.
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    ABSTRACT: Endovascular stent grafting is increasingly used to manage descending thoracic aortic pathologies. The procedure was introduced at the study hospital in 2001. We sought to examine the short-term clinical outcomes of patients who underwent this endovascular stent grafting, with the aim of using the result as baseline for development of an in-center clinical management protocol. We undertook a single-center, retrospective review of health care records of patients managed with thoracic stent grafts from 2001 to 2009. Patient characteristics, in-hospital data, and procedural data were obtained. SPSS was used to analyze the data. A total of 30 patients were treated with thoracic stent; 23 were male, 7 were female, and the mean age was 55.0. Aortic pathologies treated were traumatic aortic dissection/transection (n = 15), acute/chronic aortic dissection (n = 9), and degenerative aneurysms (n = 6). Endoleak occurred in 3 patients, with 1 requiring further endograft repair. Two patients underwent combined open and endovascular repair of acute thoracic aortic dissection; 1 died 4 days after the procedure, and the other developed stroke and acute renal failure not requiring dialysis. Of the 28 patients who underwent endovascular repair, paraplegia and paraparesis occurred in 2 patients but resolved with cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Stroke occurred in 1 patient. Patients who underwent combined procedure of open and endovascular repair of thoracic aortic dissection had a greater risk of developing major adverse events than patients who underwent endovascular repair alone (Fisher's exact test P = .023). There was no association between the risk of stroke and the coverage of left subclavian artery in this series (P = .483). Graft stenting treatment for descending thoracic aortic pathologies has been shown to result in high in-hospital survival rates. It is essential for nurses who work in acute care settings to have knowledge of this procedure and potential complications associated with the procedure to enable postoperative assessment and immediate action if any deviation is observed.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2014; 32(2):63-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the U.S. and around the globe. A large body of literature accumulated over the past several decades has shown the benefit of lowering serum total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels to reduce cardiovascular risk. National guidelines suggest therapeutic lifestyle changes, beginning with diet, as a first step toward lowering TC and LDL-C. It has been suggested a plant-based, low fat diet can substantially reduce TC and LDL- C and thereby reduce risk of cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this review is to examine the state of the science regarding the efficacy of plant-based diets in reducing serum TC and LDL-C levels. While results of the research review indicate some benefit, strong evidence supporting the efficacy of plant-based diet in reducing atherogenic lipids is lacking.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2014; 32(2):46-50.
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2014; 32(2):75.
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2014; 32(2):74.
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2014; 32(2):72.
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2014; 32(2):73.
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 06/2014; 32(2):74.
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a preventable cause of hospital death. Bedside registered nurses (RNs) are a key group that can be the first to recognize risks of patients in acute care settings. The purpose of this study was to identify bedside hospital RNs' perceived knowledge of VTE, their assessment practices, their self-efficacy in conducting VTE prevention care, and their perceived barriers to performing VTE risk assessment. An anonymous web-based survey on VTE risk assessment and prevention was conducted with RNs who provided direct patient care at two hospitals. RNs who were not directly involved in bedside patient care such as managers and educators were excluded. A total of 221 RNs completed the survey. Most participants rated their overall knowledge of VTE risk assessment between "good" (44%) and "fair" (28%). VTE assessment frequencies performed by participants varied widely. Participants reported high confidence in their ability to educate patients and families about VTE symptoms, prevention, and treatments. Participants were least confident in their own ability to conduct a thorough VTE risk assessment. Greater self-reported VTE knowledge was associated with greater VTE assessment frequency and self-efficacy for VTE preventive care. The most common perceived barriers in performing VTE risk assessment were lack of knowledge (21%) and lack of time (21%). The findings demonstrate a substantial need for focused education about VTE prevention for hospital nurses and support for hospital systems to monitor VTE care. Despite the Joint Commission emphasis on VTE risk assessment in all hospitalized patients, there remains a gap between current, evidence-based recommendations for VTE prevention and reported nursing practices.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 03/2014; 32(1):18-24.
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    ABSTRACT: Based on updated evidence, a radiology nurse systematically engaged a multidisciplinary staff in testing a protocol to prevent contrast-induced nephropathy related to computed tomography. In a quality improvement project, the protocol combined preprocedure oral hydration with postprocedure intravenous saline. This protocol safely improved kidney function, reduced postprocedure time, and decreased annual cost. By applying theory, being persistent, presenting sound evidence, and unifying the team, one concerned staff nurse profoundly affected patient care and policy in an entire medical center.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 03/2014; 32(1):10-7.
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 03/2014; 32(1):3.
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 03/2014; 32(1):29-30.
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    ABSTRACT: Acute limb ischemia is a complication of severe peripheral arterial disease that can be a threatening limb as well as life. Multiple procedures exist today to help revascularize extremities; however, even with the latest technologies, surgical amputation of the limb may still be necessary. Cryoamputation, or physiologic amputation, is a method used to treat patients who are hemodynamically unstable for the operating room and who are in need of urgent amputation owing to arterial ischemia. This procedure is used in the rare instance where not only a persons' limb is threatened, but also their life. This is a case study regarding one patient who presented to the hospital with limb-threatening ischemia who became hemodynamically unstable owing to the rhabdomyolysis associated with the ischemia of his lower extremity. Cryoamputation was used to stabilize the patient and prevent further deterioration, so that he could safely undergo surgical amputation of the limb without an increase in mortality risk. Cryoamputation must be followed by formal surgical amputation when the patient is hemodynamically stabilized. It is not a limb salvaging, procedure but it is a life-saving procedure. This case study demonstrates the usefulness of the procedure and discusses the technique used for cryoamputation.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 03/2014; 32(1):25-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Femoral pseudo-aneurysm (FPA) is a pulsatile hematoma (false aneurysm) of the femoral artery that communicates with an artery through a disruption in the arterial wall. Most often, FPA develops after an injury or angiographic access to the femoral artery with bleeding into the adjacent tissue. FPA is an uncommon complication, but a very significant one, that can have serious consequences. FPA can initially present as a new thrill or bruit, a pulsatile hematoma, or marked pain and tenderness near the site of arterial puncture. Doppler flow imaging has been the mainstay of diagnosis. Ultrasound (US)-guided compression was the treatment of choice. However, it carries drawbacks including length of time to compress for adequate closure of the artery, discomfort to patients, high recurrence rate in patients receiving anticoagulation, femoral artery thrombosis, and a success rate of only 75% overall.(1,2) An alternative to compression is US-guided thrombin injection (UGTI) of the FPA. This is a safe procedure that can be done as an outpatient or in an office setting. This paper will provide nursing guidelines and rationale as well as a nursing protocol for the management of patients who undergo UGTI for FPA.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 12/2013; 31(4):165-71.
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized medical patients. Evidence-based guidelines exist for preventing VTE; unfortunately, these guidelines are not always adhered to by clinicians. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acceptability, utility and clinical impact of an educational outreach visit (EOV) on nurses' provision of mechanical prophylaxis to hospitalized medical patients using a prospective, uncontrolled, before-and-after design. Nurses received a 1-to-1 educational session on mechanical VTE prevention by a trained nurse facilitator. The EOV intervention was designed by a multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals using social marketing theory. Eighty-five of the 120 eligible nurses (71%) attended the EOV. The median length of each visit was 11.5 minutes (interquartile range [IQR], 10-15) and the median time spent arranging and conducting each visit was 63 minutes (IQR, 49-85). Eighty-four (99%) of the 85 participants gave a verbal commitment to trial the new evidence-based mechanical VTE prevention practices. However, there were no measurable improvements in the proportion of patients risk assessed (-1.7% improvement; 95% confidence interval [CI], -7.0 to 10.3; P = .68) or provided appropriate mechanical prophylaxis (-0.3% improvement; 95% CI, -13.4 to 14; P = .96). Researchers conclude that EOV should not be used to improve nurses' use of mechanical VTE prevention because it has no measurable impact on clinical practice and is resource intensive, requiring 4.5 minutes of preparation for every minute spent face to face with participants. Further research into the specific mechanism of action is required to explain the variability in clinical effect seen with this intervention.
    Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 12/2013; 31(4):139-49.
  • Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing 12/2013; 31(4):172-3.