Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering

Description

With articles ranging from notes to completed studies, Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering is a comprehensive journal that provides an international forum for the rapid publication of essential information - including the latest engineering innovations, effects of pollutants on health, control systems, laws, and projections pertinent to environmental problems whether in the air, water, or soil. This timely journal offers answers to serious contemporary environmental issues.

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Surface sediments of Dongting Lake wetland were collected from ten sites to investigate variation trend, risk and sources of heavy metal distribution in dry seasons of 2011∼2013. The three-year mean concentrations (mg/kg) of Cr, Cu, Pb, Cd, Hg and As were 91.33, 36.27, 54.82, 4.39, 0.19 and 25.67, respectively, which were all higher than the corresponding background values. Sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) and Geo-accumulation index (Igeo) were used for the assessment of pollution level of heavy metals. The pollution risk of Cd, Hg and As were great and that of Cr needed urgent attention because of its obvious increase. Pollution load index (PLI) and geographic information system (GIS) methods were conducted to assess spatial and temporal variation of heavy metal contamination. Results confirmed an increased contamination contribution inflow from Xiang River. Multivariate statistical analyses were applied to identify contribution sources of heavy metal, which showed anthropogenic origin mainly from mining, smelting, chemical industry and agricultural activity.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 01/2015; 50(1):100-8.
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of oxygen-releasing compound (ORC) on the control of phosphorus (P) release as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of P fractions in sediment were studied through a bench-scale test. An ORC with an extended oxygen-releasing capacity was prepared. The results of the oxygen-releasing test showed that the ORC provided a prolonged period of oxygen release with a highly effective oxygen content of 60.6% when compared with powdery CaO2. In the bench-scale test, an ORC dose of 180 g·m(-2) provided a higher inhibition efficiency for P release within 50 days. With the application of the ORC, the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and redox potential (ORP) of the overlying water were notably improved, and the dissolved total phosphorus (DTP) was maintained below 0.689 mg·L(-1) compared to 2.906 mg·L(-1) without the ORC treatment. According to the P fractions distribution, the summation of all detectable P fractions in each sediment layer exhibited an enhanced accumulation tendency with the application of ORC. Higher phosphorus retention efficiencies were observed in the second and third layers of sediment from days 10 to 20 with the ORC. Phosphorus was trapped mainly in the form of iron bound P (Fe-P) and organically bound P (O-P) in sediment with the ORC, whereas the effects of the ORC on exchangeable P (EX-P), apatite-associated P (A-P) and detrital P (De-P) in the sediment sample were not significant. The microbial activities of the sediment samples demonstrated that both the dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) in the upper sediment layer increased with the ORC treatment, which indicated that the mineralization of P was accelerated and the microbial biomass was increased. As the accumulation of P suppressed the release of P, the sediment exhibited an increased P retention efficiency with the application of the ORC.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 01/2015; 50(1):49-59.
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, serious scientific and technological attention is paid to creation of alternative energy sources, including biofuels. The assessment of the quality of the biofuels produced and of the raw materials needed for the production technology is an important scientific challenge. One of the major sources for biodiesel production is plant oils material (sunflower, rapeseed, palm, soya etc.). Since plants are complex system from the biota it is not easy to find specific chemical components responsible for their ability to serve as biodiesels. The characterization and classification of plant sources as biofuel material could be reliably estimated only by the use of multivariate statistical approaches (chemometrics). The chemometric expertise makes it possible not only to classify different biofuel sources into similarity classes but also to predict the membership of unknown by origin chemically analyzed samples to already existing classes. The present study deals with the prediction of the class membership of several unknown by origin samples, which are included in a large data set with FAME profiles of biodiesel plant sources. Using a data set from chromatographic analysis of fatty acid methyl esters profiles (FAME) of different plant biodiesel sources and applying the chemometric technique know as partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS - DA) a pattern recognition procedure is developed to: I. Model classes of similarity of biodiesel plant sources using their FAME profiles not taking into account the samples with unknown origin; II. Classify correctly the samples with unknown origin to the previously defined classes of biodiesel sources (palm oil, soybean oil, peanut oil, rapeseed oil, sunflower oil and maize oil). The prediction is successfully achieved for all samples with previously unknown origin. This pattern recognition approach is applied for the first time in the field of biodiesel classification and modeling tasks.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 01/2015; 50(1):72-80.
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    ABSTRACT: Septic tanks in most developing countries are constructed without drainage trenches or leaching fields to treat toilet wastewater and /or grey water. Due to the short hydraulic retention time, effluents of these septic tanks are still highly polluted, and there is usually high accumulation of septic tank sludge or septage containing high levels of organics and pathogens that requires frequent desludging and subsequent treatment. This study aimed to reduce sludge accumulation in septic tanks by increasing temperatures of the septic tank content. An experimental study employing two laboratory-scale septic tanks fed with diluted septage and operating at temperatures of 40 and 30°C was conducted. At steady-state conditions, there were more methanogenic activities occurring in the sludge layer of the septic tank operating at the temperature of 40°C, resulting in less total volatile solids (TVS) or sludge accumulation and more methane (CH4) production than in the unit operating at 30°C. Molecular analysis found more abundance and diversity of methanogenic microorganisms in the septic tank sludge operating at 40°C than at 30°C. The reduced TVS accumulation in the 40°C septic tank would lengthen the period of septage removal, resulting in a cost-saving in desluging and septage treatment. Cost-benefit analysis of increasing temperatures in septic tanks was discussed.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 01/2015; 50(1):81-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Ethnic groups from the Atacama Desert (known as Atacameños) have been exposed to natural arsenic pollution for over 5000 years. This work presents an integral study that characterizes arsenic species in water used for human consumption. It also describes the metabolism and arsenic elimination through urine in a chronically exposed population in northern Chile. In this region, water contained total arsenic concentrations up to 1250 μg L(-1), which was almost exclusively As(V). It is also important that this water was ingested directly from natural water sources without any treatment. The ingested arsenic was extensively methylated. In urine 93% of the arsenic was found as methylated arsenic species, such as monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)]. The original ingested inorganic species [As(V)], represent less than 1% of the total urinary arsenic. Methylation activity among individuals can be assessed by measuring primary [inorganic As/methylated As] and secondary methylation [MMA/DMA] indexes. Both methylation indexes were 0.06, indicating a high biological converting capability of As(V) into MMA and then MMA into DMA, compared with the control population and other arsenic exposed populations previously reported.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 01/2015; 50(1):1-8.
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    ABSTRACT: The photocalytic degradation of dicloxacillin (DXC) using TiO2 was studied in synthetic and natural waters. The degradation route and the effect of different experimental variables such as pH, applied power, and the initial concentrations of DXC and the catalyst were investigated. The best performances were achieved at a natural pH 5.8 and using 2.0 g L(-1) of TiO2 with 150 W of applied power. The photodegradation process followed Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics. The water matrix effect was evaluated in terms of degradation efficiency in the presence of organic compounds (oxalic acid, glucose), Fe(2+) ion and natural water. An increase in degradation was observed when ferrous ion was part of the solution, but the process was inhibited with all evaluated organic compounds. Similarly, inhibition was observed when natural water was used instead of distilled water. The extent of degradation of the process was evaluated following the evolution of chemical oxygen demand (COD), antimicrobial activity (AA), total organic carbon (TOC) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5). Total removal of DXC was achieved after 120 min of treatment and 95% mineralization was observed after 480 min of treatment. Additionally, the total removal of antimicrobial activity and a high level of biodegradability were observed after the photocalytical system had been operating for 240 min.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 01/2015; 50(1):40-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Antibiotics have been intensively used over the last decades in human and animal therapy and livestock, resulting in serious environmental and public health problems, namely due to the antibiotic residues concentration in wastewaters and to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This study aimed to access the contribution of some anthropological activities, namely urban household, hospital and a wastewater treatment plant, to the spread of antibiotic resistances in the treated wastewater released into the Mondego River, Coimbra, Portugal. Six sampling sites were selected in the wastewater network and in the river. The ampicillin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae of the water samples were enumerated, isolated and phenotypically characterized in relation to their resistance profile to 13 antibiotics. Some isolates were identified into species level and investigated for the presence of class A and class C -lactamases. Results revealed high frequency of resistance to the -lactam group, cefoxitin (53.5%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid combination (43.5%), cefotaxime (22.7%), aztreonam (21.3) cefpirome (19.2%), ceftazidime (16.2%) and to the non--lactam group, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazol (21.1%), tetracycline (18.2%), followed by ciprofloxacin (14.1%). The hospital effluent showed the higher rates of resistance to all antibiotic, except two (chloramphenicol and gentamicin). Similarly, higher resistance rates were detected in the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent compared with the untreated affluent. Regarding the multidrug resistance, the highest incidence was recorded in the hospital sewage and the lowest in the urban waste. The majority of the isolates altogether are potentially extended-spectrum -lactamases positive (ESBL(+)) (51.9%), followed by AmpC(+) (44.4%) and ESBL(+)/AmpC(+) (35.2%). The most prevalent genes among the potential ESBL producers were blaOXA (33.3%), blaTEM (24.1%) and blaCTX-M (5.6%) and among the AmpC producers were blaEBC (38.9%), blaFOX (1.9%) and blaCIT (1.9%). In conclusion, the hospital and the WWTP activities revealed to have the highest contribution to the spread of multidrug resistant bacteria in the study area. Such data is important for future management of the environmental and public health risk of these contaminants. This is the first embracing study in the water network of Coimbra region on the dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants. Moreover, it is also the first report with the simultaneous detection of multiresistant bacteria producers of AmpC and ESBLs -lactamases in aquatic systems in Portugal.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 01/2015; 50(1):26-39.
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    ABSTRACT: Microwave-assisted acid digestion and modified aqua regia (HNO3:HCl:HF:H3BO3) leaching techniques were used for the determination of 15 potentially toxic elements (V, Cr, Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Ag, Cd, Sn, Hg and Pb) in sediment samples from Lake Awassa and Lake Ziway, Ethiopia. The digests were subsequently analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Mercury was directly determined in the solid samples using an elemental mercury analyzer. The precision and accuracy of the digestion procedures were verified using certified reference materials. The experimental results were in good agreement with the certified values (P < 0.05) and the recoveries were quantitative (>90%). The average relative standard deviations were below 10%. There is significant correlation between the two lakes at the 0.01 level (2-tailed). Using the sediment quality guidelines, both lakes are heavily polluted with Zn and some of the sites are heavily polluted with Cu, Ni and Pb. Based on effect range low (ERL) - effect range medium (ERM), in both lakes for Ag were greater than the ERM, indicating that the areas could be toxic to aquatic organisms, while for Cr, Cu, As and Hg the values were less than ERL.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 01/2015; 50(1):90-9.
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    ABSTRACT: As a first step for assessing the risk to human health posed by vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in the aquatic environment, we screened sewage and urban river water samples from Miyazaki, Japan for VRE. Because vancomycin-resistant organisms are not as prevalent in sewage and river water as vancomycin-susceptible organisms, the samples were screened by minimum inhibitory concentration test using the vancomycin-supplemented membrane-Enterococcus indoxyl-β-d-glucoside (mEI) agar. The isolates, presumed to be enterococci, were identified using 16S rRNA sequencing analysis. The percentages of VRE isolates screened using 4 μg mL(-1) vancomycin-supplemented mEI agar from sewage and urban river water samples were 12% and 24%, respectively. The vancomycin-resistant genes vanC1 and vanC2/3 were detected in the isolates from both samples by PCR analysis. All enterococci isolates containing vanC1, which is a specific gene for vanC-type of VRE, were identified as Enterococcus casseliflavus/gallinarum. Further, 92% enterococci isolates containing vanC2/3 were identified as E. casseliflavus/gallinarum, the remaining isolates containing vanC2/3 were E. faecium (4%) and E. faecalis (4%). Thereafter, the distribution of E. faecium and E. faecalis, which are the major types of enterococci in humans containing vanC2/3, was observed in the water samples collected.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 01/2015; 50(1):16-25.
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    ABSTRACT: This study focused on reducing the haloacetic acid (HAA) concentrations in treated drinking water. HAA has been thought to be one possible nutrient supporting heterotrophic bacteria regrowth in drinking water. In this study, experiments were conducted using a pilot-scale system to evaluate the efficiency of biological filters (BF) for reducing excess HAA concentrations in water. The BF system reduced the total HAA concentration and the concentrations of five HAA species in the water. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were the three main HAA5 species that were present in the treated drinking water in this investigation. Combined, these three species represent approximately 77% of the HAA5 in the finished water after BF. The verification of the empirical HAA equation for the outlet in the BF system indicated linear relationships with high correlation coefficients. The empirical equation for the HAA5 concentrations in the finished water was established by examining other nutrients (e.g., dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm wavelength (UV254), and ammonia nitrogen) that can reduce pathogenic contamination. These findings may be useful for designing advanced processes for conventional water treatment plants or for managing water treatment and distribution systems for providing high-quality drinking water.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 12/2014; 49(14):1693-1700.
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    ABSTRACT: On March 11, 2011, one of the negative effects of the tsunami phenomenon that devastated the Pacific coast of the Tohoku district in Japan was the deposition of a wide range of arsenic (As) contamination to the soil. To remediate such a huge area of contamination, phytoremediation by Pteris vittata, an As-hyperaccumulator, was considered. To evaluate the efficacy of applying P. vittata to the area, the salt tolerance of P. vittata and the phytoextraction of As from soil samples were investigated. For the salt tolerance test, spore germination was considerably decreased at an NaCl level of more than 100 mM. At 200 mM, the gametophytes exhibited a morphological defect. Furthermore, the growth inhibition of P. vittata was observed with a salinity that corresponded to 66.2 mS/m of electric conductivity (EC) in the soil. A laboratory phytoremediation experiment was conducted using As-contaminated soils for 166 days. P. vittata grew and accumulated As at 264 mg/kg-DW into the shoots. Consequently, the soluble As in the soil was evidently decreased. These results showed that P. vittata was applicable to the phytoremediation of As-contaminated soil with low salinity as with the contamination caused by the 2011 tsunami.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 12/2014; 49(14):1631-1638.
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    ABSTRACT: There is renewed interest in the tetra-oxy compound of +6 oxidation states of iron, ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O4(2-)), commonly called ferrate. Ferrate has the potential in cleaner ("greener") technologies for water treatment and remediation processes, as it produces potentially less toxic byproducts than other treatment chemicals (e.g., chlorine). Ferrate has strong potential to oxidize a number of contaminants, including sulfur- and nitrogen-containing compounds, estrogens, and antibiotics. This oxidation capability of ferrate combines with its efficient disinfection and coagulation properties as a multi-purpose treatment chemical in a single dose. This review focuses on the engineering aspects of ferrate use at the pilot scale to remove contaminants in and enhance physical treatment of water and wastewater. In most of the pilot-scale studies, in-line and on-line electrochemical ferrate syntheses have been applied. In this ferrate synthesis, ferrate was directly prepared in solution from an iron anode, followed by direct addition to the contaminant stream. Some older studies applied ferrate as a solid. This review presents examples of removing a range of contaminants by adding ferrate solution to the stream. Results showed that ferrate alone and in combination with additional coagulants can reduce total suspended solids (TSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), and organic matter. Ferrate also oxidizes cyanide, sulfide, arsenic, phenols, anilines, and dyes and disinfects a variety of viruses and bacteria. Limitations and drawbacks of the application of ferrate in treating contaminated water on the pilot scale are also presented.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 12/2014; 49(14):1603-1614.
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    ABSTRACT: This work investigated the effectiveness of a physicochemical and oxidative process for the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) from stabilized landfill leachates. The application of these technologies for landfill leachate treatment greatly depends on the optimal operating conditions for a specific leachate. Coagulation-flocculation followed by H2O2, Fenton and photo-Fenton processes was evaluated. Advanced oxidation processes were evaluated in the raw leachate and the leachate pretreated by coagulation-flocculation. Via the coagulation process, at 30 sec and a stirring speed of 150 rpm followed by flocculation and settling steps, 53% COD was removed at an optimal dose of 1400 mg L(-1) and pH 4.0. Moreover, from the POA evaluated, the Fenton process was determined to be the most effective process for removing COD from the leachate pretreated by coagulation-flocculation, reaching 83.3% COD removal with 1330 mg L(-1) of H2O2 and 266 mg L(-1) of Fe(2+). The photo-Fenton process applied directly to the raw effluent was effective for the removal of COD; a 75% reduction in COD was observed in tests using 2720 mg L(-1) of H2O2 and 544 mg L(-1) of Fe(2+). Due to the variability in the composition of the Gramacho landfill leachate, the combination of coagulation-flocculation and the Fenton process is an effective technology for reducing the COD in samples of this leachate.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 12/2014; 49(14):1718-1726.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the specific study is to discuss the impact of economic crisis on air quality in Greece in terms of particulate matter (PM) concentrations. For this purpose, three sampling campaigns were conducted during the winter period of 2012, 2013 and 2014 in two medium sized cities in North Greece (Kavala and Drama). The average concentrations measured ranged from 33-56, 28-47 and 25-44 μg/m(3) for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, respectively. The analysis of the daily concentration profile for all measurements indicated two distinct periods of elevated concentrations: a) during 08:00 to 10:00 and b) during 19:00 to 22:00. The observed periods of increased concentration coincided with the periods of increased urban traffic in the morning and basic heating needs in late evening. Significant correlation was observed between PM10-PM2.5 (R(2)>0.9) and PM2.5-PM1 (R(2)∼1.0) suggesting that coarse and fine particles originate from similar sources. The PM2.5/PM10 ratio values ranged from 0.84 to 0.85 indicating a major impact of PM2.5 to the final concentration levels recorded. The results presented in the specific study support the notion that a significant alteration is undergoing to the atmospheric air quality in Greece due to the economic crisis and the subsequent increase of biomass products combustion for residential heating. Supplemental materials are available for this article.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 12/2014; 49(14):1653-1660.
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    ABSTRACT: Non-ionic surfactants usually are often selected for use in surfactant flushing technology, which is a process that can be used as part of PAH-contaminated soil bioremediation. Phenanthrene (PHE) biodegradation in the presence of polyethoxylate lauryl ether (Brij 35) was studied in two soil/water systems. The natural soil organic matter content (SOM) and the present of Brij 35, both above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and below the CMC, changed the rate of PHE biodegradation in the presence of Brij 35. PHE biodegradation is different in the two different soil/water systems: PHE > PHE-Brij 35-Micelle > PHE-Brij 35-Monomer in the clay/water system; PHE-Brij 35-Micelle > PHE-Brij 35-Monomer > PHE in the natural soil/water system. Among the free-living species associated with PHE-Brij 35 biodegradation, Brevundimonas diminuta, Caulobacter spp., Mycoplana bullata, Acidovorax spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa accounted for 90.72% to 99.90% of the bacteria present. Specific hydrolytic enzymes, including esterases, glycosol-hydrolases and phosphatases, are expressed during PHE biodegradation. The information presented here will help the engineering design of more effective PAH bioremediation systems that use Brij 35 series flushing technology. In particular, micelles of Brij 35 can be used to accelerate the rate of remediation of PAH-contaminated soil in natural soil/water systems.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 12/2014; 49(14):1672-1684.
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    ABSTRACT: A central composite design (CCD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) was employed for maximizing bioleaching yields of metals (Al, Mo, Ni, and V) from as-received spent refinery catalyst using Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Three independent variables, namely initial pH, sulfur concentration, and pulp density were investigated. The pH was found to be the most influential parameter with leaching yields of metals varying inversely with pH. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the quadratic model indicated that the predicted values were in good agreement with experimental data. Under optimized conditions of 1.0% pulp density, 1.5% sulfur and pH 1.5, about 93% Ni, 44% Al, 34% Mo, and 94% V was leached from the spent refinery catalyst. Among all the metals, V had the highest maximum rate of leaching (Vmax) according to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The results of the study suggested that two-step bioleaching is efficient in leaching of metals from spent refinery catalyst. Moreover, the process can be conducted with as received spent refinery catalyst, thus making the process cost effective for large-scale applications.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 12/2014; 49(14):1740-1753.
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    ABSTRACT: The influence of the increase of the organic loading rate (OLR) on methane production in a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) from physicochemical sludge generated in a poultry slaughterhouse was evaluated. Total solid (TS) to obtain OLR of 1, 5, 10 and 15 g VS L(-1) day(-1), with hydraulic retention times of 29, 6, 6 and 4, respectively, were conditioned. The results showed a decrease in pH levels and an increase in the theoretical volatile fatty acids (VFA). While the yield of methane production decreased from 0.48 to 0.10 LCH4/g VSremoved, respectively, the OLR-10 managed on average 38% removal of volatile solids (VS) and a yield biogas production of 0.81 Lbiogas g(-1) VSremoved and 1.35 L day(-1). This suggests that the OLR increases in an anaerobic system from physicochemical sludge only inhibits the methanogenic metabolism, because there is still substrate consumption and biogas production.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 12/2014; 49(14):1710-1717.
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    ABSTRACT: N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is an emerging disinfection byproduct. Removal of its potential precursors is considered as an effective method to control NDMA. In this study, four typical NDMA precursors (dimethylamine (DMA), trimethylamine (TMA), dimethylformamide (DMFA) and dimethylaminobenzene (DMAB)) were selected, and their removal capacities by activated sludge were investigated. Batch experiments indicated that removal of NDMA precursors was better under aerobic condition than anoxic condition; and their specific degradation rates follow the order of DMA > TMA > DMFA > DMAB. In anoxic-aerobic (AO) activated sludge system, the optimal hydraulic retention time and sludge retention time were 10 h and 20 d, respectively, for the removal of both NDMA precursors (four selected NDMA precursors and NDMA formation potential (NDMA FP)) and nutrients. Our results also suggested that there was a positive correlation between NDMA FP and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in wastewater. The removal efficiency of NDMA FP was in the range of 46.8-72.5% in the four surveyed wastewater treatment plants except the one which adopted chemically enhanced primary process. The results revealed that the AO system had the advantage of removing NDMA FP. Our results are helpful for the knowledge of the removals of NDMA precursors during activated sludge treatment processes.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 12/2014; 49(14):1727-1739.