Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland)

Publisher: Elsevier

Description

  • Impact factor
    2.09
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    4.30
  • Immediacy index
    0.63
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.58
  • Other titles
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland: Online), Breast
  • ISSN
    1532-3080
  • OCLC
    44392900
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Z0011 study suggests patients with minimal disease do not require axillary clearance. Exclusions include T3 tumours, mastectomy or neoadjuvant treatment. This study assessed the utility of pre-operative US-guided core biopsy of axillary nodes and its correlation with nodal macrometastases. 247 women with breast cancer outside Z0011 criteria were reviewed retrospectively. Sensitivity and specificity of pre-operative axillary ultrasound and core biopsy compared to final histology was assessed by contingency tables. 75/247 patients had macrometastases. Ultrasound-axilla was 72% sensitive and 77% specific in predicting macrometastasis. The positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) was 58% and 86.4% respectively. Core-biopsy of axilla node, was 92.6% sensitive and 66.7% specific in detecting macrometastasis. PPV and NPV 79.4% and 86.7% respectively. Positive pre-operative ultrasound-guided core biopsy accurately predicts macroscopic involvement of axillary nodes. Selected patients outside Z0011 parameters can proceed to axillary clearance without sentinel node biopsy or risking overtreatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Chemoprevention is an option for women who are at increased risk of breast cancer (five year risk ≥1.7%). It is uncertain, however, how often women accept and complete five years of therapy and whether clinical or demographic factors predict completion. Medical records were abstracted for 219 women whose five year risk of breast cancer was ≥1.7% and who were offered chemoprevention while attending a high risk breast clinic at the Moffitt Cancer Center. We examined the likelihood of accepting chemoprevention and completing five years of therapy, and potential clinical and demographic predictors of these outcomes, using multivariable logistic regression and survival analysis models. There were 118/219 women (54.4%) who accepted a recommendation for chemoprevention and began therapy. The likelihood of accepting chemoprevention was associated with lifetime breast cancer risk and was higher for women with specific high risk conditions (lobular carcinoma in situ and atypical ductal hyperplasia). Women with osteoporosis and those that consumed alcohol were also more likely to accept medication. There were 58/118 (49.2%) women who stopped medication at least temporarily after starting therapy. Based on survival curves, an estimated 60% of women who begin chemoprevention will complete five years of therapy. A substantial percentage of women at increased risk of breast cancer will decline chemoprevention and among those that accept therapy, approximately 40% will not be able to complete five years of therapy because of side effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the benefits of adjuvant endocrine therapy for hormone receptor positive breast cancer, many women are non-adherent or discontinue endocrine treatment early. We studied differences in adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy by ethnicity in a cohort of New Zealand women with breast cancer and its impact on breast cancer outcomes. We analysed data on women (n = 1149) with newly diagnosed hormone receptor positive, non-metastatic, invasive breast cancer who were treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy in the Waikato during 2005-2011. Linked data from the Waikato Breast Cancer Registry and National Pharmaceutical Database were examined to identify differences by ethnicity in adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy and the effect of sub-optimal adherence on cancer recurrence and mortality. Overall, a high level of adherence of ≥80% was observed among 70.4% of women, which declined from 76.8% to 59.3% from the first to fifth year of treatment. Māori women were significantly more likely to be sub-optimally adherent (<80%) compared with European women (crude rate 37% vs. 28%, p = 0.005, adjusted OR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.04-2.17). Sub-optimal adherence was associated with a significantly higher risk of breast cancer mortality (HR = 1.77, 95% CI 1.05-2.99) and recurrence (HR = 2.14, 95% CI 1.46-3.14). Sub-optimal adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy was a likely contributor for breast cancer mortality inequity between Māori and European women, and highlights the need for future research to identify effective ways to increase adherence in Māori women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This is the first comprehensive analysis comparing specific aspects of tumor detection between the two "traditional" breast cancer detection methods self-detection (SD) and clinical breast examination (CBE). a) Which method is better in detecting smaller tumors? Both methods showed similar mean tumor diameters (SD: 22.1 mm vs. CBE: 21.9 mm; p = 0.991). b) Different frequency distributions of tumor locations would indicate that certain locations in the breast are more difficult to palpate: comparison of both methods showed comparable results (p = 0.835). c) General differences in tumor sizes with regard to certain locations would be of importance because the patients and/or the physicians could be educated to pay particular attention to certain locations during physical examination, where larger tumors tend to be found: tumors located in the central region were with 25.0 mm significantly larger than those in the peripheral regions of the breast (superior: 21.6 mm, p = 0.001; inferior: 21.6 mm, p = 0.015; lateral: 21.9 mm, p = 0.002; medial (20.9 mm, p = 0.001). Tumor sizes within the four peripheral regions did not differ significantly. d) Patients whose tumors were found by CBE were older than those whose tumors were found by SD (67 years vs. 60 years, p < 0.001). Conclusion: annual CBE should be an integral part of general medical care in older women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We performed a systematic review to address the comparative effectiveness of different imaging modalities in evaluating treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients. We searched seven multidisciplinary electronic databases for relevant publications (January 2003-December 2013) and performed dual abstraction of details and results for all clinical studies that involved stage IV breast cancer patients and evaluated imaging for detecting treatment response. Among 159 citations reviewed, 17 single-institution, non-randomized, observational studies met our inclusion criteria. Several studies demonstrate that changes in PET/CT standard uptake values are associated with changes in tumor volume as determined by bone scan, MRI, and/or CT. However, no studies evaluated comparative test performance between modalities or determined relationships between imaging findings and subsequent clinical decisions. Evidence for imaging's effectiveness in determining treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients is limited. More rigorous research is needed to address imaging's value in this patient population. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Few studies are available on the potential impact of body weight on breast cancer prognosis in screen-detected patients. Moreover, it is not known whether body mass index (BMI) could have a different prognostic impact in screen-detected versus symptomatic breast cancer patients. To investigate these unsolved issues, we carried out a retrospective study evaluating the effect of BMI on breast cancer prognosis in screen-detected vs symptomatic breast cancer patients. We conducted a follow-up study on 448 women diagnosed with incident, histologically-confirmed breast cancer. Patients were categorized according to their BMI as normal weight, overweight and obese. Disease free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and BMI curves were compared according to mode of cancer detection. Among screen-detected patients, higher BMI was associated with a significant lower DFS, whereas no significant difference was observed among symptomatic patients. OS showed similar results. In the multivariate analysis adjusting for age, education, tumor size, nodal status, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and menopausal status, the risk for high level of BMI among screen-detected patients did not reach the statistical significance for either recurrence or survival. Our study highlights the potential impact of high bodyweight in breast cancer prognosis, the findings confirm that obesity plays a role in women breast cancer prognosis independently from diagnosis mode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 11/2014;
  • Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The natural history of HR+ breast cancer tends to be different from hormone receptor-negative disease in terms of time to recurrence, site of recurrence and overall aggressiveness of the disease. The developmental strategies of hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer have led to the classes of selective estrogen receptor modulators, selective estrogen receptor downregulators, and aromatase inhibitors. These therapeutic options have improved breast cancer outcomes in the metastatic setting, thereby delaying the need for chemotherapy. However, a subset of hormone receptor-positive breast cancers do not benefit from endocrine therapy (intrinsic resistance), and all HR+ metastatic breast cancers ultimately develop resistance to hormonal therapies (acquired resistance). Considering the multiple pathways involved in the HR network, targeting other components of pathologically activated intracellular signaling in breast cancer may prove to be a new direction in clinical research. This review focuses on current and emerging treatments for HR+ metastatic breast cancer.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate resource utilization of single stage porcine acellular dermal matrix (ADM) assisted breast reconstruction compared with tissue expander (TE), latissimus dorsi flap and implant (LD/I) and latissimus dorsi flap and TE (LD/TE) reconstructive techniques.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in women with breast cancer; side effects of cancer treatment may worsen pre-existing sleep problems and have been pointed to as important determinants of their incidence. Therefore, we aimed to assess the association between different types of breast cancer treatment and sleep disturbances, through a systematic review. Medline (using PubMed), CINAHL Plus with full text, PsycINFO and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Central) were searched from inception to January 2014. Studies that evaluated samples of women with breast cancer, assessed sleep disturbances with standardized sleep-specific measures, and provided data for different cancer treatments were eligible. A total of 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies evaluated insomnia, five studies assessed sleep quality, two provide data on general sleep disturbances and two analysed specific sleep parameters. Women submitted to chemotherapy, or radiotherapy, tended to report higher levels of sleep disturbances. More heterogeneous findings were observed regarding the effect of surgical treatment and hormonal therapy. However, a sound assessment of the impact of these treatments was hampered by differences across studies regarding the outcomes assessed, reporting bias and the fact that most studies did not control for the effect of potential confounders. The present review highlights the potential relation between breast cancer treatments and sleep disturbances, particularly of chemotherapy, though more robust evidence is needed for a proper understanding of these associations.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the incidence of residual disease after additional surgery for positive/close margins and the impact on the rate of local and distant recurrence.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To compare sickness absence and disability pension in a population-based cohort of women with breast cancer (n = 463) from 1 year pre-diagnosis until 3 years post-diagnosis with a matched control group (n = 2310), and to investigate predictors of sickness absence during the 2nd and 3rd year post-diagnosis.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To identify (1) how frequently patients are invited to take part and actually do take part in multidisciplinary tumor conferences (MTCs), (2) which patient characteristics affect whether they are invited to MTCs and whether they decide to participate, (3) the extent to which invitation and participation depend on the specific hospital.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: One-Step Nucleic Acid Amplification (OSNA) can detect isolated tumour loads in axillary lymph nodes of breast cancer patients. We investigated the predictability of the non-sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastatic involvement (MI) based on the OSNA SLN assessment in surgical invasive breast cancer.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Immunohistochemical determination of ER/PR status has been the gold standard in clinical practice of breast cancer for decades. A cut-off of '1%' is commonly used; however, this is not supported by strict evidence. How the proportion of ER/PR-positive cells influences the response to endocrine therapy has been scarcely reported, either. To address these issues, 486 and 663 invasive breast cancer cases treated with or without adjuvant tamoxifen respectively (median follow-up period, 12.8 years) were enrolled, and effect of tamoxifen treatment was compared among ER/PR-positive or -negative groups immunohistochemically determined using various cut-offs. Tamoxifen significantly improved 5 years disease-free survival in ER/PR-positive, but not in ER/PR-negative, cases even using immunohistochemical >0% cut-off. Cases with ≥67% ER/PR expressing cells responded to tamoxifen by far the best. Patients having tumors without any ER/PR-positive cells should be excluded from endocrine therapy, whereas this therapy should be strongly recommended for those with ≥67% ER/PR-positive cells.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Determining sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in breast cancer staging involves subjective interpretation by the surgeon. We hypothesized patient and tumor characteristics influence number of SLNs harvested.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: There are around 40,000 healthcare applications (apps) available for smartphones. Apps have been reviewed in many specialties. Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in females with almost 1.38 million new cases a year worldwide. Despite the high prevalence of breast disease, apps in this field have not been reviewed to date. We have evaluated apps relevant to breast disease with an emphasis on their evidence base (EB) and medical professional involvement (MPI).
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Haematogenous spread of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) is the principle mechanism for development of metastases. Research into the enumeration and characterisation of CTCs, particularly in the last decade, has allowed the introduction of semi-automated CTC assessment in the clinical setting. In breast cancer, CTC enumeration is being used as a prognostic biomarker, a predictive biomarker of treatment response and is being assessed to guide treatment in both the early and metastatic setting. CTC characterisation has the potential to direct targeted therapies, such as HER2 therapies in HER2 negative primary breast tumour patients. However, CTC assessment has considerable challenges. Capture and identification of these very rare cells is currently largely dependent on a presumed homogeneity of phenotype. In addition, high throughput assays are lacking. The clinical significance of CTCs is incompletely understood. A large proportion of CTC positive patients have no evidence of metastases, raising the issue of either inconsequential tumour dormancy or non-viable CTCs. CTCs may have additional clinical sequelae such as promoting venous thrombosis. However CTCs provide a real-time liquid biopsy of the tumour and represent an exciting, minimally invasive method of assessing disease status and also a novel therapeutic target for malignancy.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 08/2014;
  • Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Optimal outcome for early breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy requires adequate dose delivery, commonly defined as >85% of planned dose of chemotherapy agents. Outside the clinical trial setting, reports from community oncology centres have demonstrated that a significant proportion of patients fail to receive this dose intensity, with neutropenia being the most commonly cited reason for sub-optimal treatment. Data collected prospectively on 1655 patient treated in a single breast cancer centre demonstrates that patients at risk of sub-optimal dose delivery can be identified by routine assessment of neutropenic events during the first cycle. The uniform administration of secondary G-CSF for all subsequent cycles enables dose delivery ≥85%, which was shown to lead to improved survival outcomes when compared with those patients who received <85%.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 08/2014;