Journal of Clinical Neuroscience (J CLIN NEUROSCI )

Publisher: Neurosurgical Society of Australasia, Elsevier

Journal description

The aims of the Journal of Clinical Neuroscience are to publish work relating primarily to clinical neurosurgery and neurology, and the related neurosciences such as neuro-pathology, neuro-radiology, neuro-ophthalmology and neuro-physiology. The journal has a broad international perspective, and emphasises the advances occurring in Asia, the Pacific Rim region, Europe and North America. The Journal acts as a focus for publication of major clinical and laboratory research, as well as publishing solicited manuscripts on specific subjects from experts, case reports and other information of interest to clinicians working in the clinical neurosciences.

Current impact factor: 1.32

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013/2014 Impact Factor 1.318
2012 Impact Factor 1.253
2011 Impact Factor 1.247
2010 Impact Factor 1.165
2009 Impact Factor 1.17
2008 Impact Factor 1.19

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.31
Cited half-life 4.40
Immediacy index 0.22
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.39
Website Journal of Clinical Neuroscience website
Other titles Journal of clinical neuroscience
ISSN 1532-2653
OCLC 31197430
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pseudoaneurysms of the superficial temporal artery (STA) are rare vascular lesions of the external carotid artery system and are most often incurred after blunt head trauma. Diagnosis can be made on clinical grounds, and is confirmed by ultrasonography (US) or CT angiography. Surgical ligation and excision of the aneurysm remains a definitive treatment modality. Patients with STA pseudoaneurysms are often referred to a neurovascular specialist given the neurovascular origin and gross anatomic location of these lesions. Three patients presented to our neurovascular service several weeks following blunt head injury to the anterolateral skull surface with progressive, palpable, pulsatile masses. Each patient underwent CT angiography, which demonstrated a pseudoaneurysm of the frontal branch of the STA, followed by operative ligation and en bloc excision. The present series highlights the anatomical considerations relevant to STA injury and pseudoaneurysm formation following blunt head trauma and reviews the necessary diagnostic and treatment considerations.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A 56-year-old man suffered a high velocity linear acceleration closed head injury, resulting in skull fractures including bone dehiscence at the planum sphenoidale and tuberculum sellae. After regaining consciousness, he reported blurry vision and episodic diplopia. Visual field testing showed a bitemporal hemianopia. Ocular motility testing uncovered no misalignment. Brain MRI revealed post-traumatic encephalomalacia within the optic chiasm, resulting in the visual field defect and subsequent hemifield slide. Normally, cerebral processing of overlap between the visual field prevents hemifield slide, which is caused by episodic loss of visual field overlap with subsequent slipping or sliding apart of images.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Dementia is the severe loss of global cognitive ability in a previously healthy person. This study examined the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection (HP-I) and non-Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) by using a nationwide population-based dataset. The International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for dementia were used to define dementia patients; in addition, we examined the association of dementia with other comorbidities. Patients aged ⩾40 years with newly diagnosed HP-I (ICD-9 code 041.86) during 1998–2010 were identified as the HP-I cohort. The comparison cohort consisted of people aged ⩾40 years without HP-I (non-HP-I) randomly selected from the database at a ratio of 1:4 in the same time period. The controls were frequency matched according to the age (every 5 years), sex, and index year of patients in the HP-I cohort. Follow-up was performed for all patients until the date of dementia diagnosis (ICD-9 codes 290.0–290.4, 294.1, 331.0–331.2), date of withdrawal from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance program, date of death, or until December 31 2010. Compared with patients without HP-I, HP-I patients were 1.60-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32–1.95) more likely to develop non-AD. There was no statistical association between HP-I and AD. The adjusted hazard ratio of dementia increased from 1.48 (95% CI 1.22–1.79) for patients who had HP-I once to 2.19 (95% CI 1.13–4.25) for patients who had HP-I two or more times. Our study revealed that HP-I might be a critical risk factor for the development of non-AD. A trial study to examine the microbe–dementia connection may provide further proof of the association between HP-I and dementia.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study was undertaken in view of the paucity of data regarding the profile of prothrombotic factors in children with ischemic stroke. Sixty-four children with ischemic stroke were prospectively evaluated for presence of prothrombotic factors over a 2 year period. The blood samples were analyzed for protein C (PC), protein S (PS), activated protein C resistance (APCR), factor V Leiden (FVL), anti-thrombin-III (AT-III), lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], lupus anticoagulant (LA), anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL) immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG, homocysteine, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) at least 3 months after the onset of stroke. At least one prothrombotic factor was identified in 45.3% children (29/64). These included hyperhomocysteinemia (11/64), PC deficiency (9/64), aCL (8/64), PS deficiency (5/64), APCR (3/64), AT-III deficiency (2/64) and LA (1/64). Multiple factors were coexistent in 17.2% (11/64). The prevalence of PC deficiency, PS deficiency and co-existence of multiple abnormalities observed were similar to the published literature. Elevated Lp(a) and APCR were less prevalent. FVL and MTHFR were not seen in any of the study children. Forty-five percent of children had at least one prothrombotic abnormality. Hyperhomocysteinemia, PC deficiency, aCL and PS deficiency were the most frequent prothrombotic abnormalities.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Neonatal brain injury caused by extreme prematurity remains a great challenge for prevention. Erythropoietin (EPO) has shown neuroprotective effects in a series of neonatal experimental models and recent clinical trials of premature infants. In this meta-analysis of seven clinical trials, EPO was associated with a highly reproducible reduction in the risk of neurodevelopmental disability in preterm infants. Meanwhile there was no difference in the risk for morbidity, cerebral palsy, visual deficit, severe hearing deficit, necrotizing enterocolitis, intracranial hemorrhage and patent ductus arterisus. The use of EPO, to some extent, is associated with reduction of neurodevelopmental disability in preterm infants. More double blind randomized controlled trials are needed to establish the best therapeutic approach for neuroprotection in preterm infants.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Homozygous presence of trinucleotide expansions in the frataxin (FXN) gene responsible for Friedreich’s ataxia. However, the heterozygous trinucleotide expansion in FXN results in a decreased expression of frataxin, a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and is associated with a subclinical metabolic phenotype. In this study we investigated whether heterozygous FXN trinucleotide expansion is a risk factor or modifier for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Genomic DNA from familial and sporadic ALS patients and control individuals was tested for extended FXN trinucleotide repeats by polymerase chain reaction analysis. Screening of 652 ALS patients and 238 controls revealed a lower overall frequency of heterozygously extended FXN repeats than expected. A significant difference in the frequency of the FXN expansion or an associated modification of the disease phenotype in ALS was not detected. Our findings strengthen the view that different DNA repeat expansions are toxic on the basis of specific biological mechanisms.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Movement disorders are common following cerebrovascular accidents and they can be hyperkinetic, like hemichorea and hemiballism, or hypokinetic, as seen in parkinsonian features. Monochorea has also been reported due to stroke, albeit rarely. We report a 47-year-old gentleman who presented with history of sudden onset choreiform movement in his left lower limb. On clinical examination his motor power was normal and there was no abnormal movement in any other limbs. MRI of his brain was suggestive of an infarct in the right globus pallidus interna extending up to the posterior limb of the internal capsule. He was treated with clonazepam and trihexyphenidyl. His movements improved significantly within 3 months. Monochorea in a lower limb due to an infarct in the globus pallidus interna is unusual and highlights the complexity of the pathophysiology of chorea.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A cephalic aura is a common sensory aura typically seen in frontal lobe epilepsy. The generation mechanism of cephalic aura is not fully understood. It is hypothesized that to generate a cephalic aura extensive cortical areas need to be excited. We report a patient who started to have cephalic aura after right frontal lobe resection. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed interictal spike and ictal change during cephalic aura, both of which were distributed in the right frontal region, and the latter involved much more widespread areas than the former on MEG sensors. The peculiar seizure onset pattern may indicate that surgical modification of the epileptic network was related to the appearance of cephalic aura. We hypothesize that generation of cephalic aura may be associated with more extensive cortical involvement of epileptic activity than that of interictal activity, in at least a subset of cases.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) has advantages for exploring deeper epileptic foci. Nevertheless, SEEG can only sample isolated cortical areas and its spatial limitation, with the inability to record contiguous cortical regions, may cause difficulties in interpretation. In light of these limitations, the authors describe the hybrid technique of SEEG and subdural strip electrode placement. The hybrid technique was used for a presurgical evaluation in four patients with intractable epilepsy. Initially, the depth electrodes were inserted with a robotic stereotactic system. Thereafter, a skin incision and a small craniectomy were performed at the entry point of the strip electrode trajectory. The dura was opened and, under live fluoroscopic guidance, strip electrodes were slid into the subdural space. In these patients, the additional subdural strip electrodes provided (1) information regarding the precise description of seizure spread in the cortical surface adjacent to the subdural space, (2) identification of epileptogenic zone located near the crown, (3) more precise definition of functional cortex and (4) a better delineation of the interface between epileptogenic zones and functional cortex. This hybrid technique provides additional data, offering better understanding of the dynamics of the epileptic activity and its interaction with functional cortical areas.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Shunt infections are most common within the first 6 months following implantation. A shunt infection 19 years after implantation secondary to uterine ablation has not been reported to our knowledge. Office hysteroscopic procedures have become commonplace in gynecologic practice. Infectious complication rates are low, but peritonitis has been described. We present a patient with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection following a uterine ablation for dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Three days following the ablation she developed abdominal pain. CT scan of the abdomen 5 months after the procedure revealed a pseudocyst. She then underwent removal of her shunt with intra-operative cultures revealing Streptococcus agalactiae. Definitive treatment consisted of shunt explantation and antibiotic treatment with complete resolution of her pain and pseudocyst. Consideration for prophylactic antibiotics should be made when a patient with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt undergoes any transvaginal procedure.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Adult brainstem astrocytomas are a rare and heterogeneous group of malignancies. Most reports represent low-grade gliomas. This study used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database to analyze the association between survival and demographic factors, tumor histology, and treatment characteristics among adult patients with high-grade brainstem astrocytoma (HGBSA). Adult patients with histologically confirmed diagnoses of primary HGBSA were studied. In univariate and multivariate analysis, we investigated the effect of demographics, tumor histology and treatment modality on survival. Overall median survival in the cohort of 240 adult patients was 7 months, with 1, 2, 5 and 10 year survival rates of 33.2%, 19.7%, 10.1%, and 8.3%, respectively. Age >50 years (hazard ratio [HR] 1.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45 –2.70, p < 0.001) and grade IV versus grade III tumor (HR 1.61, 95% CI 1.15–2.26, p = 0.006) were associated with statistically significant increased mortality in multivariate analyses. Surgical intervention trended toward association with lower mortality (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.47–1.01, p = 0.055). Our findings suggest that in patients with HGBSA, younger age and lower-grade histology are associated with better prognosis. Surgical intervention trended towards a significant association with better outcome, while radiation treatment was not associated with a statistically significant benefit in survival.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Herpesviruses, including human herpesvirus-6 and varicella zoster virus have been implicated in the disease aetiology of multiple sclerosis. These viruses are capable of reactivation, reminiscent of the relapsing-remitting nature of multiple sclerosis. However, viral DNA has also been reported present in healthy controls, often at similar prevalence rates. This study aimed to determine whether prevalence could be associated with different stages of activity of the disease as well as the inflammatory status of the patients. Polymerase chain reaction assays were used to screen for human herpesvirus-6 and varicella zoster virus DNA in blood from 31 Caucasian patients with multiple sclerosis and 30 healthy age, sex and race matched control subjects. The patients were screened for inflammation using C-reactive protein as a marker and were also categorized according to their remitting/relapsing status. Results showed a positive finding for human herpesvirus-6 in blood from only one patient (3.2%) and human herpesvirus-6 DNA was not present in any control subjects. Varicella zoster virus was not detected in either the patients or control subjects. Similar to some other studies we saw an absence or very low viral positivity in blood from both patients and controls. These findings were irrespective of relapse episodes, increased inflammatory status or duration of the disease. Results therefore do not support a causative role for either human herpesvirus-6 or varicella zoster virus in the disease aetiology of multiple sclerosis, but rather that prevalence in patients may be linked to that of the general population.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the sole etiological treatment for Wilson disease (WD), but several neurological complications after OLT have been reported. We report a WD patient who developed a unilateral wing-beating tremor 6 years after OLT. New neurological symptoms develop immediately after OLT in most cases. In our patient, the onset of extrapyramidal symptoms was significantly after OLT. To our knowledge this is the first patient with delayed appearance of extrapyramidal symptoms after OLT in WD where the pathophysiology of these late extrapyramidal symptoms is still unknown.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Intra-arterial (IA) therapy for stroke is an increasingly utilised management approach for acute ischaemic stroke. We aimed to correlate radiological characteristics and recanalisation success with radiological and functional outcomes at 90 days in patients treated with IA therapy. This was a single centre, retrospective study investigating the correlation between pre-procedural Computed Tomography-Angiogram Source Image (CTA-SI) Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score (ASPECTS), recanalisation success, and functional outcome at 90 days in patients with an acute ischaemic stroke from 2007–2012. Outcome measures were pre-procedural non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT), CTA-SI, and post-procedural NCCT ASPECTS that were obtained and analysed by three blinded reviewers, recanalisation success (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction [TICI] 2b–3) and favourable clinical outcome (90 day modified Rankin scale [mRS] score ⩽ 2). Forty-four patients satisfied the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 64.2 years (standard deviation: 14.9; median: 66.5; interquartile range [IQR]: 54.5–76.5). The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 17 (IQR: 13.5–20). Twenty-one (47.7%) patients achieved a mRS score ⩽ 2. The 90 day mortality rate was 25.0% (n = 11). Of the patients who achieved TICI 2b–3, 65.5% (19/29) achieved mRS ⩽ 2. There was a statistically significant association between recanalisation success (TICI ⩾ 2b) and favourable neurological outcome at 90 days (odds ratio [OR] 25.22, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.86–222.37, p < 0.005). Patients with high pre-procedural CTA-SI ASPECTS are significantly more likely to have high post-procedural NCCT score (OR 23.36, 95% CI: 3.26–166.92, p = 0.002). Recanalisation success was strongly associated with good clinical outcome, unaffected by known predictive factors, which included age and stroke severity. This association was unattenuated by CTA-SI ASPECTS.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Dyskinesias are one of the most frequent and disabling complications of the long-term treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although the cause is not completely understood, it appears that an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory inputs from the basal ganglia to the motor cortex leads to overactivation of motor and premotor areas. Overactivation of the supplementary motor area (SMA) has been observed in neuroimaging studies in dyskinetic PD patients. We investigated the effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the SMA on levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) and motor performance in PD. We tested whether longer duration (10 days) and higher number of total pulses (1800 pulses) would enhance the beneficial effect. Seventeen dyskinetic PD patients were randomly assigned to real rTMS or sham (placebo) rTMS, and 1 Hz rTMS or sham rTMS was applied over the SMA for 10 consecutive days. Patients were assessed at baseline and 1 day after the last rTMS with a levodopa challenge test, and video recordings were taken. Dyskinesias and motor performance were rated off-line by two blinded raters using video recordings. After 10 days of treatment with rTMS, we observed that 1 Hz rTMS delivered over the SMA had decreased LID lasting for 24 hours without a change in motor performance, whereas sham rTMS induced no significant change in dyskinesia scores. These results support a possible therapeutic effect of low-frequency rTMS in LID. However, in order to suggest rTMS as an effective treatment, long-term observations and further investigations with a larger patient population are essential.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Granular cell astrocytoma (GCA) is an uncommon malignant glial tumour that is associated with a poor prognosis. GCA cells have some morphological and immunohistochemical similarities to macrophages. In this case, a small biopsy contained no typical astrocytoma and large rounded lesional cells were interpreted as negative for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100 and positive for CD68, a commonly used marker for macrophages. A diagnosis of a histiocytosis was made. When the patient failed to respond to first and second line therapy, tumour resection was undertaken and the pathology then showed typical morphologic and immunohistochemical features of glioblastoma (astrocytoma World Health Organization grade IV).
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014; 21(8).
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    ABSTRACT: Disturbed sleep is common in Parkinson’s disease and has a detrimental impact on functioning and quality of life. While the progression of the disease contributes to the aetiology of sleep problems in Parkinson’s disease, it is unknown whether an individual’s beliefs and attitudes about sleep play a role. In this study we sought to investigate whether dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep could be related to subjective and objective measures of sleep disturbance in Parkinson’s disease. Ninety-three patients with Parkinson’s disease completed the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep 16 item questionnaire, which comprises four domains: Expectations, Worry/Helplessness, Consequences and Medication. Patients also completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaire and Beck Depression Inventory-II. Patients wore actigraphy watches and completed sleep diaries for 2 consecutive weeks, recording measures of sleep disturbance including Sleep Onset and Offset, Wake After Sleep Onset, Sleep Efficiency, and Wake Bouts per hour. Greater dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes in the domains of Worry/Helplessness and Medication were associated with lower perceived sleep quality and greater depressive symptoms. However, no relationships were found between dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep and any objective actigraphic measure of sleep disturbance. These findings suggest that beliefs and attitudes about sleep in Parkinson’s disease are associated with mood disturbance, rather than objective measures of sleep. Thus it is possible that interventions targeting mood may lead to more accurate perceptions of sleep and improved quality of life in Parkinson’s disease patients.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The activation of hemostatic systems has been detected in spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients. The influence of plasma D-dimer levels on clinical outcome remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the impact of elevated plasma D-dimer levels on early mortality and long-term functional outcome in spontaneous ICH. A total of 259 spontaneous ICH patients (<24 hours from ictus) between November 2010 and October 2011 were included. Clinical information and radiological findings were collected at admission. Spearman correlation analyses revealed that D-dimer concentrations were correlated with midline shift, hematoma volume, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) score and Glasgow Coma Scale score. Patients with subarachnoid extension had significantly higher D-dimer levels than those without SAH extension. Comparison of patients with IVH and those without yielded a similar result. Multivariate stepwise backward logistic analysis identified plasma D-dimer levels as an independent risk factor for 7 day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.237, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.017–1.504, p = 0.033) and 3 month poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale score ⩾3) (adjusted OR = 2.279, 95% CI 1.130–6.595, p = 0.026). The mechanisms by which elevated D-dimer affects the prognoses of spontaneous ICH patients remain unclear and require clarification in future studies.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This cross sectional study assessed the prevalence of behavioral comorbidity and its association with epilepsy-related factors in children and adolescents with epilepsy. One hundred consecutive patients with active epilepsy, aged 6–16 years, were screened for behavioral comorbidity using the Child Behavior Checklist and those who qualified as having behavioral comorbidity were compared with those who did not have it. Behavioral comorbidity was found in 43 of 100 participants. Being treated with antiepileptic drug polytherapy (odds ratio 6.3, 95% confidence interval 1.4–17.3, p = 0.01) independently predicted behavioral comorbidity in the patients studied. The demonstrated high frequency of behavioral comorbidity in children with epilepsy suggests that pediatrician and pediatric neurologists should be sensitive to this fact in order to identify behavioral comorbidity in children with epilepsy.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder that causes muscle weakness, disability, respiratory failure, and eventually death. However, some ALS patients are diagnosed only after developing respiratory failure. To study the reason for delayed diagnosis of ALS, we reviewed cases of ALS patients with respiratory failure. We retrospectively reviewed all 200 patients diagnosed with sporadic ALS in our hospital from January 2001 to April 2011. Among them, we focused on seven patients who were diagnosed only after developing respiratory failure. We reviewed their clinical characteristics and demographics. The mean time from onset to a correct diagnosis was 15.6 ± standard deviation of 8.0 months. Two patients had already been intubated at a previous hospital because they presented with severe respiratory failure and required emergency intubation. One patient was intubated upon arrival to our hospital. We identified three reasons for the delay in diagnosis: delayed referral to a neurologist (four patients); a shortage of neurologists in rural areas (three patients); and an atypical clinical course with respiratory failure as the initial symptom (two patients). Three patients had undergone emergency intubation without giving informed consent. To provide an informed choice and to avoid unwanted intubation for ALS patients, we suggest extending neurological knowledge of ALS to general practitioners.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 08/2014;