Journal of Pharmacy Practice (J Pharm Pract )

Publisher: SAGE Publications

Description

Today's pharmacist needs to know the basics in many areas of practice. Many are turning to the Journal of Pharmacy Practice for a quick - yet comprehensive - background to specific topics vital to the profession. This is because each timely issue focuses in-depth on a single theme. Recent themes included: Asthma Pharmacotherapy, Emergency Toxicology, Chemical Dependency, Interdisciplinary Carepaths, Biotechnology, Diet Drug Disaster, Drug Information, Pain Management, Critical Care. The Journal of Pharmacy Practice is presented in a scholarly peer-review format. Guest editors are selected for particular expertise in the subject area, and then recruit contributors from that practice specialty, and bring the information together in a relevant and timely fashion for the pharmacist reader.

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
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  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice website
  • Other titles
    Journal of pharmacy practice (Online), Journal of pharmacy practice
  • ISSN
    1531-1937
  • OCLC
    44708155
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

SAGE Publications

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors retain copyright
    • Pre-print on any website
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website, departmental website, institutional website or institutional repository
    • On other repositories including PubMed Central after 12 months embargo
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Post-print version with changes from referees comments can be used
    • "as published" final version with layout and copy-editing changes cannot be archived but can be used on secure institutional intranet
  • Classification
    ‚Äč green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), with a reported incidence ranging from 0.49 to 2 events per 1000 deliveries. Risk factors include advanced maternal age, obesity, smoking, and cesarian section. Women with a history of previous VTE are at a 4-fold higher risk of recurrent thromboembolic events during subsequent pregnancies. Additionally, the presence of concomitant thrombophilia, particularly factor V Leiden (homozygosity), prothrombin gene mutation (homozygosity), or antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), increases the risk of pregnancy-related VTE. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and unfractionated heparin (UFH) are the drugs of choice for anticoagulation during pregnancy. LMWH is preferred due to ease of use and lower rates of adverse events. Women with high thromboembolic risk particularly those with a family history of VTE should receive antepartum thromboprophylaxis. Women with low thromboembolic risk or previous VTE caused by a transient risk factor (ie, provoked), who have no family history of VTE, may undergo antepartum surveillance. Postpartum anticoagulation can be considered in women with both high and low thromboembolic risk.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Acquired thrombophilia is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the most prevalent acquired thrombophilia and is associated with both venous and arterial thromboses. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is another form of acquired thrombophilia. Risk factors associated with VTE in this population include those related to the disease itself, host factors, and the pharmacotherapy for HIV. A significant proportion of VTE events occur in patients with malignancies. There is an increase in mortality associated with patients having cancer who experience VTE when compared to patients having cancer without VTE. Combination oral contraceptive (COC) use infers risk of thromboembolic events. The risk is dependent upon the presence of an underlying inherited thrombophilia, the estrogen dose, and generation of progestin. Patients at highest risk of VTE include those receiving high-dose estrogen and fourth-generation, progesterone-containing contraceptives. With the exception of APS, thrombophilia status does not alter the acute treatment of an initial VTE in nonpregnant patients.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 04/2014;
  • Journal of Pharmacy Practice 04/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although controversial, screening for thrombophilia has become common. Testing for antiphospholipid antibodies is indicated in order to guide treatment decisions if there is clinical suspicion for antiphospholipid syndrome. The utility of identifying other thrombophilias in symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) is questionable, as the risk of recurrence does not appear to be increased by an appreciable degree with the most common disorders (heterozygosity for factor V Leiden or prothrombin mutation). Although recurrence appears to be increased in those with homozygous or multiple abnormalities and potentially deficiencies in natural anticoagulants, screening to detect these conditions is difficult to justify based on their rarity. The American College of Chest Physicians' current guidelines note the increased risk of recurrence with idiopathic, proximal events regardless of thrombophilia status. They suggest duration of anticoagulation therapy be based on location and provoking factors rather than whether or not the individual has a thrombophilia. Because routine prophylaxis in asymptomatic individuals with thrombophilia is not recommended, screening of asymptomatic family members is difficult to justify. Screening prior to prescribing combination oral contraceptives is not cost effective, may result in unwanted pregnancies, and may have little effect on the overall rate of VTE.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Thrombophilia alters normal hemostasis, shifting the balance in favor of thrombus formation. Inherited conditions include factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin G20210A mutation, deficiencies in natural anticoagulants (antithrombin [AT], protein C, and protein S), hyperhomocysteinemia, and elevations in clotting factors (factors VIII and XI). Although FVL and prothrombin mutation are common disorders, deficiencies in the natural anticoagulants are rare. The risk of initial thrombosis conferred by inherited thrombophilia varies with the highest risk in those homozygous for either FVL or prothrombin mutation, or with AT deficiency. In the nonpregnant patient, the presence of a thrombophilia does not affect treatment of an acute event. Although vitamin B supplementation has been shown to decrease the levels of homocysteine, the treatment has failed to show a benefit in thrombus prevention and is therefore not recommended.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective:To review the evidence of an association between olmesartan medoxomil and symptoms mimicking celiac disease.Data Sources:Literature was searched in PubMed (1965-November 2013) using the key words or MeSH terms olmesartan, enteropathy, celiac disease, sprue, and diarrhea. References from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Dipiro's Pharmacotherapy eighth edition textbook were also reviewed.Data Synthesis:There have been recent implications of olmesartan medoxomil being linked to symptoms mimicking celiac disease. Investigators first identified the association in 22 patients who presented with presumed refractory celiac disease. Upon further evaluation, it was discovered that these symptoms improved when olmesartan was discontinued. In response to this report, additional case studies have been published. DeGaetani et al also further analyzed patients with seronegative villous atrophy from the Celiac Disease Center and found that olmesartan accounted for 22% of previously unclassified sprue cases. Conversely, the authors of the ROADMAP trial, which compared olmesartan to placebo, found no significant differences in the incidence of gastrointestinal adverse effects.Conclusions:There is growing evidence supporting the association between olmesartan and sprue-like symptoms; however, further research is warranted. These symptoms can be life threatening and clinicians should be aware of the potential association.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence and mortality of melanoma are on the rise. Historically, patients diagnosed with metastatic melanoma were faced with a grim prognosis, with survival rates of 15% at 5 years. Prior to 2011, no drug or therapeutic regimen had been shown to improve overall survival (OS) in metastatic melanoma. Chemotherapeutic agents, such as dacarbazine or temozolomide, are often given to patients for palliative purposes; high-dose interleukin 2 and biochemotherapy are immunotherapeutic options that could be offered to patients with a good performance status at specialized centers. Neither has been shown to impact OS, but durable complete responses are seen in a minority of patients. Since 2011, 4 new drugs have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of metastatic melanoma, all of which improve survival. Three of these agents (vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib) are targeted therapies, with ipilimumab being the only new immunotherapy. With a focus on immunotherapeutic agents, this review seeks to summarize the treatment options currently available for metastatic melanoma and to examine those on the near horizon.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective:To examine the factors impacting postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) residents' self-perceived readiness for residency.Methods:A total of 1801 residents who matched in American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP)-accredited PGY1 programs were e-mailed individualized invitations to take an online survey. The survey collected self-ratings of readiness for residency training competencies including time management and organization, foundational knowledge, clinical practice, project management, and communication. Key Findings:Data from 556 completed surveys were analyzed. Residents agreed they were ready to perform activities requiring time management and organization (median = 4, mean = 4.08), foundational knowledge (median = 4, mean = 3.83), clinical practice (median = 4, mean = 3.67), and communication (median = 4, mean = 4.05). Residents who completed at least 1 academic advance pharmacy practice experience (APPE), 5 clinical APPEs, or held a bachelors degree felt more confident than their counterparts in regard to project management (P < .001, <.001, and .01, respectively).Conclusion:PGY1 residents generally felt prepared for time management and organization, foundational knowledge, and communication residency training competencies. This was significant for those who completed 1 or more academic APPEs, 5 or more clinical rotations, or a bachelors degree. Study results may assist pharmacy schools in preparing students for residency training, prospective resident applicants in becoming more competitive candidates for residency programs, and residency program directors in resident selection.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose:Identify and summarize articles that describe the value that pharmacy residency training offers to sponsoring health systems.Summary:There is a tremendous gap between the number of resident applicants and the number of pharmacy residencies available. Informing health-system administration executives about the proven value of residency training is key to expanding the number of available positions. To address this disparity, a comprehensive and systematic literature search to identify publications highlighting the value that pharmacy residency training provides to the sponsor hospital or health system was conducted. Articles were identified through query of PubMed and SciVerse SCOPUS and through review of bibliographies from relevant articles. Twenty articles were identified and summarized in this annotated bibliography that demonstrate perceived and quantitative value of pharmacy residency training for health systems that sponsor residency training.Conclusion:Pharmacy residency training programs are essential for pharmacists that will primarily engage in direct patient care activities. This annotated bibliography includes key publications that provide evidence of the value that pharmacy residents provide to the sponsoring health system. This manuscript will aid prospective residency directors interested in developing new residency positions at new institutions or for residency program directors interested in expanding the total number of resident positions available at the existing sites.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic and substance of abuse. Numerous effects can result from the abuse of ketamine. Death from acute direct toxicity is rare. Ketamine can alter numerous functions in the brain including color perception, memory, attention, cognition, reaction time, and sense of time and can produce psychological addiction. Chronic ketamine abuse can produce toxicity to the gastrointestinal and urinary tract. Gastrointestinal changes include epigastric pain, hepatic dysfunction, and impaired gallbladder activity. The most common urological condition from ketamine is cystitis but renal failure has been reported.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background:Recommendations for treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) emphasize early empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics. However, appropriate antibiotic de-escalation is also critical for optimal patient care.Materials and Methods:We examined how often intensivists in our institution appropriately de-escalated antibiotics in cases of suspected VAP, and whether decision support by intensive care unit pharmacists could improve rates of antibiotic targeting and early antibiotic discontinuation in low-risk patients.Main Results:A total of 92 (observation phase = 50; intervention phase = 42) patients with suspected VAP were identified. During the observation phase, 39 cases yielded positive sputum cultures, but in only 23 (59%) were antibiotics targeted to culture results. This rate improved during the intervention phase when 29 (91%) of 32 cases with positive cultures were targeted (P value .003). There were 48 cases in which the risk of pneumonia was considered low. Of the 26 low-risk cases in the observation phase, 5 (19%) had antibiotics discontinued early versus 5 (23%) of the 22 cases in the intervention phase.Conclusions:Decision support by clinical pharmacists significantly improved rates of appropriate antibiotic targeting in cases of culture-positive suspected VAP but did not have a significant effect on early antibiotic discontinuation in patients at low risk of true pneumonia.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose:This article identifies, prioritizes, and summarizes the published literature on the medication use process (MUP) from calendar year 2012 that can impact health-system pharmacists' daily practice.Summary:The MUP is the foundational system that provides the framework for safe patient care within the health care environment. The MUP is defined in this article as having the following components: prescribing/transcribing, dispensing, administration, and monitoring. A PubMed search was conducted in January 2013 for calendar year 2012 using targeted Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) keywords, providing a total of 944 articles. A thorough review identified 46 potentially significant articles: 14 for prescribing/transcribing, 12 for dispensing, 10 for administration, and 10 for monitoring. Peer review led to the selection of key articles from each category. These articles are briefly summarized, with a mention of why this article is important within health-system pharmacy. The other articles are listed for further review and evaluation.Conclusion:It is important to routinely review the published literature and to incorporate significant findings into daily practice. Health-system pharmacists have an active role in improving the MUP in their institution and awareness of the significant published studies can assist in changing practice at the institutional level.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common heterogeneous psychiatric disorder manifesting with obsessions and compulsions. Obsessions are intrusive, recurrent, and persistent unwanted thoughts. Compulsions are repetitive behaviors or mental acts that an individual feels driven to perform in response to the obsessions. The heterogeneity of OCD includes themes of obsessions, types of rituals, presence or absence of tics, etiology, genetics, and response to pharmacotherapy. Complications of OCD include interpersonal difficulties, unemployment, substance abuse, criminal justice issues, and physical injuries. Areas of the brain involved in the pathophysiology include the orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate gyrus, and basal ganglia. Overall, OCD may be due to a malfunction in the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit in the brain. Neurotransmitters implicated in OCD include serotonin, dopamine, and glutamate. Numerous drugs such as atypical antipsychotics and dopaminergic agents can cause or exacerbate OCD symptoms. The etiology includes genetics and neurological insults. Treatment of OCD includes psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy, transcranial magnetic simulation, and in extreme cases surgery. Exposure and response prevention is the most effective form of psychotherapy. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the preferred pharmacotherapy. Higher doses than listed in the package insert and a longer trial are often needed for SSRIs than compared to other psychiatric disorders. Alternatives to SSRIs include clomipramine and serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Treatment of resistant cases includes augmentation with atypical antipsychotics, pindolol, buspirone, and glutamate-blocking agents.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Quality-related events (QREs), including medication errors and near misses, are an inevitable part of community pharmacy practice. As QREs have significant implications for patient safety, pharmacy regulatory authorities across North America are increasing their expectations regarding QRE reporting and learning. Such expectations, commonly encapsulated as standards of practice (SoP), vary greatly between pharmacy jurisdictions and may range from the simple requirement to document QREs occurring within the pharmacy, all the way to requiring that quality improvement plans have been put in place. This research explores the uptake of QRE reporting and learning SoP and how this uptake varies based on pharmacy characteristics including location, prescription volume, and pharmacy type. Secondary data analysis of 91 community pharmacy assessments in Nova Scotia, Canada, was used to explore uptake of QRE standards. Overall, pharmacies are performing relatively well on reporting QREs. However, despite initial success with basic QRE reporting, community pharmacy uptake of QRE learning activities is lagging.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives:To investigate the potential cost savings of using functional platelet assays to confirm the diagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT).Methods: This was a single-center study conducted in the United States. We performed a retrospective cost of illness analysis of suspected HIT, comparing patients with the serotonin release assay (SRA) ordered as part of their diagnostic evaluation to those who did not. The primary clinical end point was a composite of mortality and major bleed.Results: A total of 147 patients met the study's inclusion criteria. An SRA was ordered in 53 patients of whom 17% were positive. Overall, SRA use did not reduce the composite primary clinical end point (32.1% vs 33%, P = .911). Also, there was no difference in the total cost of hospital stay (US $84781.1 vs US $78534.4, P = .409) nor in the direct medical costs related to HIT management (US $7473.5 vs US $8402.4, P = .393). Early ordering of the SRA (within 48 hours) was associated with shorter length of stay (20 vs 27 days, P = .029) but without a difference in cost of treatment.Conclusion: The use of SRA did not reduce the costs or improve clinical outcomes in patients with suspected HIT.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose:Alogliptin is the newest dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitor approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes either alone or in combination with other antidiabetic agents. The purpose of this review is to highlight the clinical studies that led to Food and Drug Administration approval of alogliptin and to provide insight into the place in therapy for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.Summary:As a DPP-4 inhibitor, alogliptin raises postprandial levels of glucagon-like peptide 1, leading to insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. When given as monotherapy, alogliptin has the ability to reduce glycoslate hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by 0.4% to 1.0%. Combination therapy yielded similar reductions with some variability depending on the agent with which alogliptin was combined. The mean HbA1c reduction seen with alogliptin is relative to the degree of HbA1c elevation at baseline. Alogliptin appears to be weight neutral and is relatively well tolerated with few adverse effects. Furthermore, alogliptin has proven to result in comparable efficacy and tolerability in the elderly as in the younger population.Conclusion:Alogliptin alone or in combination with other antidiabetic agents has shown a significant reduction in HbA1c while remaining safe and tolerable. The efficacy profile of alogliptin is comparable to other DPP-4 inhibitors. Additional long-term research is necessary with regard to long-standing efficacy and effects on beta-cell function.
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice 02/2014;