Communications of the Association for Information Systems

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  • ISSN
    1529-3181

Publications in this journal

  • Communications of the Association for Information Systems 01/2014; 34(1):865-892.
  • Communications of the Association for Information Systems 01/2014; 34(1):11.
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    ABSTRACT: The phenomenon of social support―aid and assistance exchanged through social relationships and interpersonal transactions―has been studied extensively for decades. In the context of healthcare virtual support communities, researchers have focused on exploring community members’ support behavior and its effects on individuals’ health outcomes. This emphasis, however, has led to the neglect of another type of social interaction that also promotes individual health―companionship activities. We argue that in order to gain a deeper insight into the online support phenomenon, the consideration of companionship activities, in addition to social support exchange, is necessary. To bridge this gap in the literature, this article attempts to contrast community members’ support behavior and companionship activities in two large healthcare virtual support communities―one for patients with breast cancer and the other for patients with prostate cancer. Based on the identification of the two types of social activities from the two cancer support communities, the relationship between individuals’ participation in these activities, and gender differences in their activity engagement are also hypothesized and tested. Our goal is to advance the understanding of online socio-behavioral dynamics of virtual support communities. We also wish to provide insights into the design of such communities and the delivery of patient-focused healthcare interventions.
    Communications of the Association for Information Systems 01/2014; 34.
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    ABSTRACT: Mobile phones’ exponential growth is fuelling the emergence of mobile health (mHealth), thus contributing to healthcare services’ innovative transformation in developing countries. mHealth’s ubiquitous personalised capabilities obviate the access barriers and dismal performance of conventional systems, therefore gaining popularity among patients. Researchers have focused on service quality―a vital element of service adoption―and sustainability. For mHealth to become a robust alternative, how patients perceive mHealth vis-à-vis conventional services must be understood. Comparative analysis studies between mHealth and conventional systems are scarce yet would contribute to theory and strengthen the antecedent phases to service quality, that is, design and operation. mHealth is a viable alternative for fulfiling the unmet goal of quality of life for all. Prompted by these insights, this study is the first attempt to discover the differentiating characteristics of mHealth. Patients’ perceptions were analyzed by multiple discriminant analysis, a classification technique. The findings show that, in distinguishing between healthcare services, mHealth is a favourable alternative: service differentiation occurs along the dimensions of ubiquity, information-quality, and value. The findings’ implications for theory and practice and future research guidelines are also discussed.
    Communications of the Association for Information Systems 01/2014; 34(34).
  • Communications of the Association for Information Systems 01/2014; 34(6).
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    ABSTRACT: This article is a response to the assessment by IS scholars that there are significant research questions to be addressed in the important topic of information systems innovation. For example, Swanson concludes that current theory explains little about IS innovation; Avgerou describes it as a relatively unexplored subject, and Fichman identifies signs of exhaustion in the current research agenda. The result of our analysis is an adaptation of ecological systems theory (EST) in order to apply it to the IS innovation landscape. We then build on the theoretical framework to propose an agenda for future research in terms of research directions, research themes, and study designs. Finally, implications for researchers and practitioners are discussed.
    Communications of the Association for Information Systems 12/2013; 33(Article 26).
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    ABSTRACT: Business Process Management (BPM) is accepted globally as an organizational approach to enhance productivity and drive cost efficiencies. Studies confirm a shortage of BPM skilled professionals with limited opportunities to develop the required BPM expertise. This study investigates this gap starting from a critical analysis of BPM courses offered by Australian universities and training institutions. These courses were analyzed and mapped against a leading BPM capability framework to determine how well current BPM education and training offerings in Australia address the core capabilities required by BPM professionals globally. To determine the BPM skill-sets sought by industry, online recruitment advertisements were collated, analyzed, and mapped against this BPM capability framework. The outcomes provide a detailed overview on the alignment of available BPM education/training and industry demand. These insights are useful for BPM professionals and their employers to build awareness of the BPM capabilities required for a BPM mature organization. Universities and other training institutions will benefit from these results by understanding where demand is, where the gaps are, and what other BPM education providers are supplying. This structured comparison method could continue to provide a common ground for future discussion across university-industry boundaries and continuous alignment of their respective practices.
    Communications of the Association for Information Systems 12/2013; 33.
  • Communications of the Association for Information Systems 12/2013; 33(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The growing complexity and high rate of change in the technological and business environments, paired with resource constraints faced by educational institutions, make it difficult for IS programs to offer in-depth education across the variety of topics comprising the IS discipline. Specialization may be an effective way for IS educators to provide rigorous education, while incorporating material related to the latest technological and business developments. This opinion essay considers the area of business analysis as one such area of specialization. The essay examines the place of business analysis in IS research and practice, as well as the current state of business analysis coverage in IS curriculum. Recommendations regarding strengthening the area of business analysis are provided, including the creation of a stand-alone business analysis course in IS curriculum, defining business analysis as a specialization area or career track, and strengthening ties with professional associations.
    Communications of the Association for Information Systems 12/2013; 33(521-540).
  • Communications of the Association for Information Systems 01/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: In December 2012, the AIS Special Interest Group on Decision Support, Knowledge and Data Management Systems (SIGDSS) and the Teradata University Network (TUN) cosponsored the Business Intelligence Congress 3 and conducted surveys to assess academia’s response to the growing market need for students with Business Intelligence (BI) and Business Analytics (BA) skillsets. This panel report describes the key findings and best practices that were identified, with an emphasis on what has changed since the BI Congress efforts in 2009 and 2010. The article also serves as a “call to action” for universities regarding the need to respond to emerging market needs in BI/BA, including “Big Data.” The IS field continues to be well positioned to be the leader in creating the next generation BI/BA workforce. To do so, we believe that IS leaders need to continuously refine BI/BA curriculum to keep pace with the turbulent BI/BA marketplace.
    Communications of the Association for Information Systems 01/2013;
  • Communications of the Association for Information Systems 01/2013;

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