Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: American Nephrology Nurses' Association

Journal description

The Nephrology Nursing Journal is a refereed clinical and scientific resource that provides current information on wide variety of subjects to facilitate the practice of professional nephrology nursing. Its purpose is to disseminate information on the latest advances in research, practice, and education to nephrology nurses to positively influence the quality of care they provide. The Nephrology Nursing Journal is designed to meet the educational and information needs of nephrology nurses in a variety of roles at all levels of practice. It also serves as a source for nonnephrology nurses. Its content expands the knowledge base for nephrology nurses, stimulates professional growth, guides research-based practice, presents new technological developments, and provides a forum for review of critical issues promoting the advancement of nephrology nursing practice.

Current impact factor: 0.77

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 0.765

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Nephrology Nursing Journal website
Other titles Nephrology nursing journal
ISSN 1526-744X
OCLC 42378837
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 03/2015; 42(2):155-166.
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    ABSTRACT: Patient safety culture has been studied in many practice settings, but there is a dearth of information on the culture of safety in nephrology nurse practice settings. This research study employed the use of an online survey to assess patient safety cultures in nephrology nurse practice settings. The survey was created using items from two Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) survey assessment tools – the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Select items from these tools were combined to address the safety of care delivered in hospital and outpatient nephrology nurse practice settings. Almost 1,000 nephrology nurses responded to the survey. Analysis of results and comparison with AHRQ comparative data found high ratings for teamwork, but indicted a continued need for additional education and attention related to hand hygiene, medication administration safety, communication, and prioritization in nephrology practice settings. Nurses in all nephrology nurse practice settings need to routinely assess and positively contribute to the culture of patient safety in their practice settings, and lead and engage in efforts to ensure that patients are safe.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 09/2014; 41(5):459-475.
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Problem/Purpose. To establish the evidence on which to base a protocol for monitoring capillary blood glucose in hospitalized patients with diabetes mellitus in the immediate post-acute hemodialysis period. Sample. Hospitalized, non-critically ill, adult patients (n = 68) with diabetes undergoing acute hemodialysis treatments. Methods. Capillary blood glucose was tested 30 minutes prior to the end of the hemodialysis treatment, at the end of the treatment, and 30 minutes and 60 minutes post-treatment. Data were analyzed to determine both within and between patient variability. Results. Glucose levels varied widely before, during, and after hemodialysis, with greatest variability at 60 minutes post-hemodialysis. Levels did not vary based on diabetes type or admitting diagnosis. Possible relationships were identified with length of treatment, insulin administration prior to treatment, and food consumed within an hour after treatment. Conclusions/Nursing Implications. Testing post-dialysis glucose levels earlier than 60 minutes post-treatment may miss the need for additional medication.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 09/2014; 41(5).
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    ABSTRACT: Placement of an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) prior to initiating dialysis can affect clinical outcomes for patients who subsequently initiate chronic hemodialysis treatments. Age-related variation in receipt of a functioning AVF prior to initiating dialysis is not well known. The purpose of this study was to examine age-related rates in use of AVF at the first outpatient dialysis treatment among U.S. incident patients on hemodialysis. Among 526,145 identified, the use of AVF at the first outpatient dialysis treatment was lower in the youngest (<55 year) and oldest (≥80 year) vs. both 55-66 year and 67-79 year age groups. These findings persisted after adjusting for demographics, lifestyle behavior, employment and insurance status, physical/functional conditions, and comorbid conditions. The presence of a functioning AVF at initial dialysis treatment varies by age. Modifying healthcare policy and/or expanding the role of the renal nurse practitioner should be considered to address this issue.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 09/2014; 41(5):507-518.
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    ABSTRACT: In 1999, patient safety moved to the forefront of health care based upon astonishing statistics and a landmark report released by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). This report, To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System, caught the attention of the media, and there were headlines across the nation about the safety (or lack of safety) for patients in healthcare organizations. In the ensuing years, there have been many efforts to reduce medical errors. Clinicians reviewed their practices, researchers looked for better ways of doing things, and safety and quality organizations focused attention on the topic of patient safety. Initiatives and guidelines were established to define, measure, and improve patient safety practices and culture. Nurses remain central to providing an environment and culture of safety, and as a result, nurses are emerging as safety leaders in the healthcare setting. This article discusses the history of the patient safety movement in the United States and describes the concepts of patient safety and patient safety culture as the foundations for excellent health care delivery.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 09/2014; 41(5):447-459, 505.
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    ABSTRACT: A comprehensive literature review was conducted to determine the effect of diabetic foot checks on patient awareness, satisfaction, and outcomes. An algorithm was developed based on evidence-based practice, best practice guidelines, and current literature that can be used by nurses and medical staff in the management of foot-related problems in patients with diabetes on dialysis. An educational resource guide was also developed for use when education is required for foot-related problems.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 07/2014; 41(4):381-90; quiz 391.
  • Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 07/2014; 41(4):341.
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    ABSTRACT: Much of the evidence supporting a focus on end-of-life care for persons with kidney disease is in the form of expert opinion and professional practice guidelines based on multi-disciplinary input and an exploration of the known illness trajectory for renal disease. Limited intervention studies or randomized control trials related to palliative or hospice care for patients in the U.S. with ESRD remain, providing rich opportunities for nephrology researchers. Nephrology nurses should remain vigilant and open to opportunities to participate in research related to improving end-of-life care for persons with ESRD and should be at the forefront of designing evidence-based practice projects for end-of-life care options for this population.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 07/2014; 41(4):416-9, 423.
  • Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 07/2014; 41(4):424-8.
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we described the content and characteristics of 40 non-proprietary websites offering information about chronic kidney disease (CKD) and evaluated their information quality using the DISCERN scale and readability using Flesch Reading Ease and Flesch-Kincaid grade level. The areas in which the websites scored the lowest on the DISCERN scale were whether the website discussed knowledge gaps, presented balanced information, and was clear about the information source. Websites that rated higher quality on the DISCERN scale were more difficult to read. The quality and readability of many websites about CKD to be used as meaningful educational resources for patients who desire to learn more about CKD and treatment options remain inadequate.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 07/2014; 41(4):355-63; 364.
  • Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 07/2014; 41(4):343-4.
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    ABSTRACT: Urgent-start peritoneal dialysis (PD) refers to the initiation of dialysis soon after a PD catheter placement and is a treatment option available to the late-referred patient with advanced kidney disease. This article reviews nursing aspects of urgent-start PD and can serve as a guide for this evolving clinical pathway that can provide renal replacement therapy for a critical segment of the population with Stage 5 chronic kidney disease who require renal replacement therapy.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 07/2014; 41(4):347-52; quiz 353.
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    ABSTRACT: Nephrology nurse shortages have historically been viewed as a subset of the overall nursing supply in the United States. Not-here-to-fore considered as a contributing factor are the effects of word-of-mouth and Internet-based word-of-mouth communications from nurses who have had disappointing work experiences in hemodialysis clinics. This article discusses the potential effects of word-of-mouse communications and posits that negative word-of-mouse communications may discourage new and experienced nurses from considering the specialty of nephrology nursing, thus contributing to a nephrology nursing shortage.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 07/2014; 41(4):371-6; quiz 377.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the occurrence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a Alaskan Native/American Indian healthcare network using two diagnostic methods: single measure and repeat measures according to current guidelines. This descriptive study of laboratory data (n = 15,515) found that the diagnosis of CKD was overstated when single measures (9.6%) were used compared to multiple measures (5.0%). Occurrence rates of CKD varied significantly depending on the method used for diagnosis.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 07/2014; 41(4):409-14; quiz 415.
  • Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 07/2014; 41(4):420-3.
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    ABSTRACT: Vaccine rates in patients on hemodialysis are substantially lower than the Healthy People 2020 targets. The purpose of this study is to utilize the perceptions and cues for action constructs of the Health Belief Model (HBM) to assess the attitudes of patients receiving outpatient hemodialysis regarding acceptance of the seasonal influenza, pneumococcal, and hepatitis B virus vaccines. Vaccine acceptance is defined as receiving the vaccine. Study findings suggest age, perceived susceptibility, and perceived severity increase the odds of getting some vaccines. Findings have implications for the development of patient education materials, interdisciplinary team assessments, and plan of care strategies to increase vaccine acceptance.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 07/2014; 41(4):393-406; quiz 407.
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    ABSTRACT: Conflict is common in healthcare settings and can affect the functioning of a dialysis clinic. Unresolved conflict can decrease staff productivity and teamwork, and potentially decrease the quality of patient care. This article discusses the causes and effects of conflict, describes the five basic conflict-handling styles that can be useful when dealing with conflict (avoidance, accommodation, competing, compromise, and collaboration), and provides resources for resolving patient-provider conflict.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 07/2014; 41(4):365-8; quiz 369.
  • Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 05/2014; 41(3):243-4.
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    ABSTRACT: Isothermal hemodialysis to improve intradialytic tolerance in hypotension-prone patients has been effective in outpatient settings. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine thermal control in an acute care setting and describe comfort issues associated with thermal control Although complaints of cold or shivering occurred more frequently with the isothermal hemodialysis group, cold discomfort was managed by nursing interventions and was not a cause of significant discomfort. No statistically significant difference was observed in blood pressure or patient's comfort level between standard and isothermal dialysis. However, isothermal hemodialysis may be an appropriate hemodialysis option for control of intradialytic hypotension in the acute care setting. Further research is recommended.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 05/2014; 41(3):275-80; quiz 281.
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    ABSTRACT: Dry weight has most frequently been defined by the patient becoming symptomatic when fluid removal is attempted Hypervolemia and fluid removal require ongoing evaluation and the use of a number of strategies. This article reviews strategies for removing fluid during hemodialysis, hemodynamics of fluid removal, and interventions associated with the strategies for fluid removal.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 05/2014; 41(3):257-63; quiz 264.