Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association (Nephrol Nurs J )

Publisher: American Nephrology Nurses' Association

Description

The Nephrology Nursing Journal is a refereed clinical and scientific resource that provides current information on wide variety of subjects to facilitate the practice of professional nephrology nursing. Its purpose is to disseminate information on the latest advances in research, practice, and education to nephrology nurses to positively influence the quality of care they provide. The Nephrology Nursing Journal is designed to meet the educational and information needs of nephrology nurses in a variety of roles at all levels of practice. It also serves as a source for nonnephrology nurses. Its content expands the knowledge base for nephrology nurses, stimulates professional growth, guides research-based practice, presents new technological developments, and provides a forum for review of critical issues promoting the advancement of nephrology nursing practice.

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  • Website
    Nephrology Nursing Journal website
  • Other titles
    Nephrology nursing journal
  • ISSN
    1526-744X
  • OCLC
    42378837
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 05/2014; 41(3):326.
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    ABSTRACT: The growing incidence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) has resulted in an ever-increasing demand for hemodialysis services throughout the country. Unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP), including dialysis technicians or patient care technicians (PCTs), and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) or licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) perform a vital role in the care of patients undergoing hemodialysis and are a critical staff component in hemodialysis facilities. This analysis provides a broad overview of the positions of states with respect to the administration of heparin and saline via peripheral and central lines by PCTs and LPNs/LVNs in the hemodialysis setting.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 05/2014; 41(3):247-54; quiz 255.
  • Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 05/2014; 41(3):243-4.
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    ABSTRACT: In 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) enacted a requirement for the mandatory certification of non-licensed hemodialysis patient care technicians (PCTs) effective in 2010. This study examined the perceived status of PCT training and the impact of the mandatory certification on patient care. Results indicated that there are differences between the current and ideal elements of PCT training programs; the use of electronic education materials and online education courses and programs is limited, and infection control practices, vascular access care, and patient safety are the most needed areas for future PCT education. Respondents were mixed in their perceptions of the impact certification has had on patient care.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 05/2014; 41(3):265-73, 287; quiz 274.
  • Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 05/2014; 41(3):241, 254.
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    ABSTRACT: Isothermal hemodialysis to improve intradialytic tolerance in hypotension-prone patients has been effective in outpatient settings. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine thermal control in an acute care setting and describe comfort issues associated with thermal control Although complaints of cold or shivering occurred more frequently with the isothermal hemodialysis group, cold discomfort was managed by nursing interventions and was not a cause of significant discomfort. No statistically significant difference was observed in blood pressure or patient's comfort level between standard and isothermal dialysis. However, isothermal hemodialysis may be an appropriate hemodialysis option for control of intradialytic hypotension in the acute care setting. Further research is recommended.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 05/2014; 41(3):275-80; quiz 281.
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    ABSTRACT: Dry weight has most frequently been defined by the patient becoming symptomatic when fluid removal is attempted Hypervolemia and fluid removal require ongoing evaluation and the use of a number of strategies. This article reviews strategies for removing fluid during hemodialysis, hemodynamics of fluid removal, and interventions associated with the strategies for fluid removal.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 05/2014; 41(3):257-63; quiz 264.
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    ABSTRACT: This hermeneutic-phenomenological study explores the lived experiences of patients on hemodialysis in regard to the adherence to treatment and quality of life. Fifteen patients were interviewed, including six women and nine men from three dialysis centers in Chile. Two main themes derived from the analysis: 1) embracing the disease and dialysis, and 2) preventing progression of the disease through treatment management. The findings suggest that patients recognize adherence to treatment and quality of life as conditions that derive from self-care and environmental conditions, which the healthcare provider must constantly assess for care planning to improve the adherence and quality of life in this population.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 05/2014; 41(3):289-97, 316; quiz 298.
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    ABSTRACT: Long-term central venous catheter (CVC) use among patients on hemodialysis increases the risk of infection, morbidity, and mortality. This article describes the use of Kotter's process of change to establish a multidisciplinary vascular access team to facilitate the replacement of CVCs with long-term accesses. Through the implementation of vascular access teams and the execution of Kotter's eight-step process for leading change, hemodialysis clinics will have the tools needed to reduce CVC utilization rates and improve patient healthcare outcomes.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 05/2014; 41(3):283-7; quiz 288.
  • Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 05/2014; 41(3):311-6; quiz 317.
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined whether a change infrequency of administration of erythropoietin-stimulating agent affected hemoglobin levels in patients on peritoneal dialysis. Data were extracted from the Australian Renal Anaemia Management database for the years 2002 and 2008. Less frequent dosing and increasing age were associated with higher hemoglobin levels, while increasing ferritin levels and later years were associated with lower hemoglobin levels.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 03/2013; 40(2):135.
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    ABSTRACT: Fatigue is common for individuals receiving hemodialysis and can lead to decreased physical function, quality of life, and survival. Because fatigue is frequently reported as bothersome, nurses must discover effective ways to assist patients to manage this symptom. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of non-pharmacologic interventions used to minimize fatigue. Interventions found to significantly reduce fatigue included exercise and Eastern medicine-based therapies.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 03/2013; 40(5):407-27; quiz 428.
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    ABSTRACT: Empowering interventions can improve person-centered care. A pre- and post-evaluation using interactive research involving two years of empowering interventions was designed to improve quality of care in outpatients with chronic kidney disease who were pre-dialysis. The results showed significantly increased empowerment in the intervention group. Interactive research facilitated the implementation of the empowerment intervention, which may increase sustainability over time.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 01/2012; 39(4):285-93; quiz 294.
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    ABSTRACT: The sale of solid organs is illegal in many countries, but the reality is that it happens. This study investigated and identified the structure of sacrificing something important among compensated kidney donors in the Philippines by conducting in-depth, face-to-face dialogues from 13 participants in the town of Baseco, Manila, Philippines. The structure of sacrificing something important among compensated kidney donors emerges from the extrinsic intent of adversity and the intrinsic intent of altruism, which is instrumental to the struggle of making a difficult decision, emerging in the act with reciprocation, and although resulting in the consequences of health deterioration and loss, resilience makes bouncing back possible.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 01/2012; 39(2):107-17; quiz 118.
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    ABSTRACT: Nephrology nurses are often faced with the responsibility of triage. Shortness of breath in a patient receiving chronic dialysis is a frequently heard complaint. Clinicians, at first glance, will consider volume expansion as the probable cause for the shortness of breath, and most often, they are correct. However, for some, that assumption may prove to be detrimental, and moreover, life-threatening. This article discusses pulmonary embolism as a possible consideration when patients present with the complaint of shortness of breath. The incidence, pathogenesis, evaluation, and treatment of pulmonary embolism in patients with chronic kidney disease are reviewed.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 01/2011; 38(2):127-37, 152; quiz 138.
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    ABSTRACT: Patient knowledge of hemodialysis and end stage renal disease (ESRD) is crucial to effective self-management and improved outcomes. This project evaluated the effect on patient knowledge of a short-term, one-on-one educational program for patients with ESRD. Twenty-six participants completed a knowledge survey before and after the educational intervention. The structured one-on-one sessions on ESRD education improved overall knowledge scores from an average of 66% to 90% on pre- and post-test assessment, respectively. Findings showed a significant improvement in ESRD knowledge post-intervention (p < 0.000), which could lead to improved self management and better outcomes.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 01/2011; 38(6):483-8; quiz 489.
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    ABSTRACT: When individuals with chronic kidney disease require ongoing assistance with activities of daily living and disease management, the consistent care provided by family caregivers often averts the need for institutional placement These caregivers may experience physical and mental burden when supports are not in place to provide occasional help and relief In some states, public programs have been developed to provide assistance to family caregivers, such as respite care, caregiver training, and tax credits. However, policies among the states are not consistent. This study identified factors that have influenced the development of family caregiver-friendly policies and programs in two study states, Connecticut and New Jersey. The case study method used in this research utilized data from informant interviews, document review, and observation of select meetings and hearings to identify 11 factors or themes that impacted public policy development benefiting family caregivers. Two primary factors, state fiscal environment/philosophy and advocacy, were found to be critical to the policymaking process. Based on these findings, specific measures are described that nephrology nurses can take to help influence adoption of policies benefiting caregivers. In addition, information to help caregivers access available programs through agencies, organizations, and informational Web sites is identified.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 01/2011; 38(5):395-402; quiz 403.
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    ABSTRACT: In 2003, the Nephrology Section at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center embraced a new concept for providing care that included a continuing care manager and a nephrologist working together with the patient to introduce stage-based education and clinical interventions. This study compares the outcomes of patients initiating hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis who received CKD care using a multidisciplinary care model (n = 89) with those who received traditional nephrology care (n = 82). Overall, the findings in this study support the use of the multidisciplinary clinic as a method for improving care of the patient with CKD initiating dialysis, and reducing hospital admissions and costs. The care coordination provided in the multidisciplinary setting improved the number of fistulas placed (60.7% vs. 21%, p < 0.001), the number of fistulas used for dialysis initiation (40.4% vs. 12.3, p < 0.001), and the management of anemia with higher hemoglobin levels prior to dialysis initiation (10.9 g/dL vs. 10.0 g/dL, p = 0.003). Patients receiving multidisciplinary care were 42% less likely to be admitted to the hospital for dialysis initiation, had significantly fewer days hospitalized (p = 0.001), fewer admissions (p = 0.005), and reduced charges for a 90-day period (p = 0.003) after dialysis initiation.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 01/2011; 38(2):165-71.
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    ABSTRACT: Racial bias, stigma, stereotyping and health disparities are pervasive in health care across America. The purposes of this research study were to assess if there was a significant difference in cultural knowledge and awareness in college health science students before and after receiving education about Native Americans receiving hemodialysis. Pre- and post-surveys were administered to assess cultural attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge. The intervention included a one-hour presentation on the findings of a research study. The qualitative component included students' writing a critical reflection paper related to a case study of a young Native American with chronic kidney disease. There was a statistically significant difference in the pre- and post-test, suggesting that students can learn cultural awareness from Native Americans receiving dialysis and can apply culturally aware interventions following an education session based on clinical research. The themes of this study were a) approaching the patient with an open mind; b) developing trust, c) assessing beliefs, culture, and knowledge; d) educating and re-educating with patient and family; e) convincing the patient to have dialysis; and f) creating a sacred space. Nephrology nurses can partner with local colleges to present findings from research and help facilitate culturally relevant care.
    Nephrology nursing journal: journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association 01/2011; 38(1):21-30; quiz 31.

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