Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery

Publisher: Arthroscopy Association of North America; International Society of Arthroscopy, Knee Surgery, and Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Elsevier

Description

Nowhere is minimally invasive surgery explained better than in Arthroscopy, the leading peer-reviewed journal in the field. Every issue enables you to put into perspective the usefulness of the various emerging arthroscopic techniques. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods -- along with their applications in various situations -- are discussed in relation to their efficiency, efficacy and cost benefit. New in 2000 - paid subscribers to the journal also receive access to the journal's expanded website. New online features include full text of all articles, video clips, short reports, and Medline links to related articles.

Impact factor 3.10

  • 5-year impact
    3.51
  • Cited half-life
    7.20
  • Immediacy index
    0.67
  • Eigenfactor
    0.02
  • Article influence
    1.10
  • Website
    Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery website
  • Other titles
    Online short reports., Arthroscopy (Online), Arthroscopy
  • ISSN
    1526-3231
  • OCLC
    42084448
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • James H. Lubowitz M.D., Matthew T. Provencher M.D., Jefferson C. Brand M.D., Michael J. Rossi M.D.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 02/2015;
  • Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 02/2015;
  • Stephen S. Burkhart M.D.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 02/2015;
  • Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 01/2015;
  • Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 01/2015;
  • T. Sean Lynch M.D., Ronak M. Patel M.D., Alex Benedick B.S., Nirav H. Amin M.D., Morgan H. Jones M.D., Anthony Miniaci M.D.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Suture repair of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has been widely abandoned in favor of ACL reconstruction, largely because of the high rates of failure and unreliability of the outcomes after suture repair. However, there have been recent basic science studies that suggest that combining a suture repair with a biological adjunct may improve the results of suture repair of the ACL, with several studies in large animal models showing equivalent strength of an ACL treated with bio-enhanced repaired to that of an ACL graft at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. In addition, the groups treated with bio-enhanced repair had significantly less osteoarthritis when compared with the animals undergoing ACL reconstruction. These findings have led to a renewed interest in bio-enhanced primary repair as a way to make repair of the ACL a viable option for a select group of patients in the future.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: To establish the rate of use of various void fillers in the setting of opening-wedge osteotomy around the knee, the types of fixation used, and the rates of delayed union or nonunion related to these variables. In addition, this review addressed short-term to midterm outcomes and complication rates associated with such procedures. The electronic databases Medline, Embase, and PubMed were searched using the methodology for systematic review as recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration. The search terms used were as follows: knee, osteotomy, knee joint, bone grafting, opening osteotomy, opening wedge, tibial osteotomy, femoral osteotomy, and bone substitute. We screened 1,383 articles and applied exclusion criteria. Fifty-six articles were included. We included 3,033 cases of osteotomy in 2,910 patients. The mean age of patients was 50 years, with a mean follow-up period of 42 months. Male patients comprised 52% of patients. The mean alignment change was 10.8°, shifting the mechanical axis to 5.1° valgus. Delayed union/nonunion rates were 2.6%, 4.6%, and 4.5% for autograft, allograft bone, and synthetic bone substitutes, respectively (P = .03). Delayed union/nonunion rates were significantly lower for autograft compared with allograft (P = .03) and for autograft and allograft compared with synthetic bone substitutes (P < .0001). Non-locking plates (n = 2,148) had a rate of delayed union/nonunion of 3.7% and a mean loss of correction over time of 0.5°. Locking plates (n = 681) had a rate of delayed union/nonunion of 2.6% and a loss of correction of 2.3°. All mean knee outcome scores improved, and an overall complication rate of 14% was found. Opening-wedge osteotomy had good short-term to midterm outcomes with acceptable complication rates. The lowest rates of delayed union/nonunion were in autograft bone-filled osteotomies. Plate type does not appear to affect osteotomy union or loss of correction. Level IV, systematic review of Level I to IV studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: To systematically review the current literature for evidence that would substantiate the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures. We performed a systematic search in PubMed and Embase of studies written in the English and Spanish languages that compared the use of PRP with a control group in patients with ACL injuries assessing graft-to-bone healing, graft maturation, and/or clinical outcomes and were randomized controlled trials or prospective cohort studies. Eleven studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria, comprising 516 patients (266 ACL reconstructions using PRP and 250 ACL reconstructions without PRP). Six studies reported a statistically significant difference (4 studies) or tendency toward faster graft maturation in the platelet group (2 studies). One study found no differences. Regarding tunnel healing/widening, 1 study showed faster healing in the PRP group and 5 studies showed no differences between the 2 groups. Considering clinical outcomes, 1 study showed better clinical outcomes with PRP use and 5 studies showed no benefits with the use of PRP. Concerning ACL graft maturation, there is promising evidence that the addition of PRP could be a synergic factor in acquiring maturity more quickly than grafts with no PRP, with the clinical implication of this remaining unclear. Regarding tunnel healing, it appears that there is not an improvement with the addition of PRP. There is no proof that clinical outcomes of ACL surgery are enhanced by the use of PRP. Level III, systematic review of Level I through III studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Multiple meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials have been conducted to compare clinical and functional outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using metallic interference screw (MIS) versus bioabsorbable interference screw (BIS) fixation, but discrepancies in their findings have prevented a consensus conclusion. The purposes of this study were (1) to conduct a systematic review of meta-analyses comparing MISs and BISs in ACL reconstruction, (2) to provide surgical treatment recommendations for ACL graft fixation based on the highest available evidence, and (3) to propose future research avenues in areas of practice lacking high-level evidence. The literature was systematically reviewed to identify meta-analyses comparing MISs and BISs in ACL reconstruction. Data were extracted for clinical and functional outcomes, and methodologic quality was assessed using the validated Quality of Reporting of Meta-analyses and Oxman-Guyatt systems. To determine which meta-analyses provided the current best available evidence, the Jadad decision algorithm was used. One Level I and 2 Level II meta-analyses were included. None showed differences between BISs and MISs in validated outcome scores, pivot-shift testing, KT arthrometry (MEDmetric, San Diego, CA), or loss of knee motion. Subgroup analyses found no differences in clinical outcomes or knee stability across biomaterials. All meta-analyses were of high quality according to the Quality of Reporting of Meta-analyses and Oxman-Guyatt systems. Two meta-analyses were determined by the Jadad algorithm to represent the current best available evidence. Both studies showed prolonged knee effusion with BIS use, with 1 also showing an increased incidence of femoral tunnel widening and screw breakage with BIS use. Whereas clinical and functional outcomes are similar with MISs and BISs, prolonged knee effusion, femoral tunnel widening, and screw breakage are more common with BIS use. Future cost-effectiveness analyses may help weigh the known advantages of BISs against their costs and adverse-event profile. Level II, systematic review of Level I and II studies. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to compare surgical treatment options for young patients with glenohumeral arthritis. A systematic review of the English-language literature was conducted by searching PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus with the following term: "(shoulder OR glenohumeral) AND (arthritis OR osteoarthritis) AND (young OR younger)." Studies that reported clinical or radiological outcomes of nonbiologic surgical treatment of generalized glenohumeral arthritis in patients younger than 60 years of age were included. Data were extracted to include study and patient characteristics, surgical technique, outcome scores, pain relief, satisfaction, functional improvement, return to activity, health-related quality of life, complications, need for and time to revision, range of motion, and radiological outcomes. Study quality was assessed with the Modified Coleman Methodology Score. Thirty-two studies containing a total of 1,229 shoulders met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Pain scores improved significantly more after total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) than after hemiarthroplasty (HA) (P < .001). Patient satisfaction was similar after HA and TSA. Revision surgery was equally likely after HA, TSA, and arthroscopic debridement (AD). Complications were significantly less common after AD than after HA (P = .0049) and TSA (P < .001). AD and TSA afforded better recovery of active forward flexion and external rotation than did HA. At radiological follow-up, subluxation was similarly common after HA and TSA. According to current Level IV data, TSA and HA provide greater improvement of pain and range of motion than does HA in the surgical treatment of young patients with glenohumeral arthritis. AD is an efficacious and particularly safe alternative in the short term for young patients with concerns about arthroplasty. Level IV, systematic review of Level IV studies. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The autograft of choice for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remains controversial. Recently, there has been an increase in interest in the quadriceps tendon as an autologous graft option for ACL reconstruction. The purposes of this study were to provide an in-depth review of quadriceps tendon anatomy, histology, and biomechanics and to synthesize reported clinical outcomes of ACL reconstructions using quadriceps tendon autografts. We hypothesize that (1) published studies on the anatomic, histologic, and biomechanical data regarding the quadriceps tendon support its use as a graft option for ACL reconstruction and (2) clinical outcomes of ACL reconstruction using quadriceps tendon autograft have similar clinical outcomes to bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts with less donor-site morbidity. We performed a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the anatomy, histology, and biomechanical studies of the quadriceps tendon, as well as a systematic review of clinical studies (Level of Evidence I-III) evaluating outcomes after ACL reconstruction using quadriceps tendon autograft. Stability outcomes, functional outcomes, range of motion, patient satisfaction, morbidity, and complications were comprised. Fourteen studies were included in the review of clinical results, including 1,154 ACL reconstructions with quadriceps tendon autograft. Six studies directly compared quadriceps tendon autografts (n = 383) with bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts (n = 484). Stability outcomes (Lachman, pivot-shift, and instrumented laxity testing), functional outcomes (International Knee Documentation Committee and Lysholm scores), overall patient satisfaction, range of motion, and complications were similar between quadriceps tendon and other graft options. Less donor-site morbidity was seen in patients who underwent quadriceps tendon ACL reconstructions. Use of the quadriceps tendon autograft for ACL reconstruction is supported by current orthopaedic literature. It is a safe, reproducible, and versatile graft that should be considered in future studies of ACL reconstruction. Level III, systematic review of Level I, II, and III studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes after arthroscopically assisted coracoclavicular (CC) fixation using a single adjustable-loop-length suspensory fixation device for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to report intraoperative and postoperative complications. Eighteen consecutive patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation underwent arthroscopically assisted CC fixation using a single TightRope (Arthrex, Naples, FL). Using the Rockwood classification, 3 patients had grade III dislocations, one patient had a grade IV dislocation, and 14 patients had grade V dislocations. The preoperative CC distance of the injured shoulder was 16.1 ± 2.7 mm (range, 11.2 to 21.0 mm), and it increased by 99% ± 36% (range, 17% to 153%) on average compared with the contralateral shoulder. The average CC distance was 10.5 ± 2.5 mm (range, 7.7 to 15.5 mm), and it increased by 30% ± 30% (range, -9.4% to 90%) at the final follow-up. Compared with immediate postoperative radiographs, the CC distance was maintained in 12 patients, increased between 50% and 100% in 4 patients, and increased more than 100% in 2 patients at final follow-up. However, there was no statistical difference in Constant scores between 6 patients with reduction loss (95.6 ± 4.5) and 12 patients with reduction maintenance (98.4 ± 2.5; P = .17). Perioperative complications occurred in 8 patients, including one case of acromioclavicular arthritis, one case of delayed distal clavicular fracture at the clavicular hole of the device, 3 cases of clavicular or coracoid button failures, and 3 cases of clavicular bony erosion. Satisfactory clinical outcomes were obtained after CC fixation using the single adjustable-loop-length suspensory fixation device for acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation. However, CC fixation failure of greater than 50% of the unaffected side in radiological examinations occurred in 33% of the patients within 3 months after the operation. Additionally, 8 patients (44%) had complications associated with the adjustable-loop-length suspensory fixation device and surgical technical problems. Despite acceptable shoulder function restoration, adequate care should be exercised in surgical treatment of acute acromioclavicular dislocation with a single adjustable-loop-length suspensory fixation device for optimal radiological outcomes. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of preoperative osteoarthritis (OA) that precludes benefit from hip arthroscopy by systematically reviewing the literature on hip arthroscopy in the setting of OA. We searched the Medline and PubMed databases using the following Medical Subject Heading terms: arthritis, osteoarthritis, chondral damage, chondral injury, chondral delamination, and hip arthroscopy. Two authors independently reviewed the literature and included articles if they were in the English language; commented on preoperative factors, parameters, physical examination, or diagnostic testing that may be evidence of cartilage damage and/or arthritis; contained outcome data on patients undergoing hip arthroscopy; and had a sample size of at least 10 patients with arthritic changes in the hip. We excluded review articles, technique articles, articles with overlapping patient populations, articles with hip arthroscopy used as an adjunct to an open procedure, articles with inflammatory and septic arthritis, and articles with a mean age younger than 18 years. Our search identified 518 articles, of which 15 met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Two thousand fifty-one hips underwent arthroscopy at a mean patient age of 40.2 years. Of these, 1,195 hips had signs of OA. There were 345 conversions to total hip arthroplasty/surface replacement arthroplasty. Of these patients, 274 had OA. Eight patient-reported outcome instruments were used. Factors influencing outcomes were preoperative OA, age, chondral damage, femoroacetabular impingement, and duration of symptoms. Current evidence is insufficient to define a cutoff for how much arthritis is too much for hip arthroscopy. However, this analysis shows that patients with a Tönnis grade of 1 or greater or a joint space of 2 mm or less are less likely to benefit from hip arthroscopy and more likely to require conversion to total hip arthroplasty/surface replacement arthroplasty. Postoperative scores on patient-reported outcome instruments are lower in the arthritic population at follow-up compared with their nonarthritic counterparts. Level IV, systematic review of Level III and IV studies. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review of the available literature to define the level of quality evidence for determining the sensitivity and specificity of different radiographic views in detecting knee osteoarthritis and to determine the impact of different grading systems on the ability to detect knee osteoarthritis. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify studies that evaluated the standing anteroposterior (AP) and 45° posteroanterior (PA) views for tibiofemoral and patellofemoral arthritis and those comparing the use of the Kellgren-Lawrence versus the joint space narrowing (JSN) radiographic grading systems using arthroscopy as the gold standard. A comprehensive search of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, the Cochrane Database, Clinicaltrial.gov, and EMBASE was performed using the keywords “osteoarthritis,” “knee,” “x-ray,” “sensitivity,” and “arthroscopy.” Results Six studies were included in the evaluation. The 45° flexion PA view showed a higher sensitivity than the standing AP view for detecting severe arthritis involving either the medial or lateral tibiofemoral compartment. There was no difference in the specificities for the 2 views. The direct comparison of the Kellgren-Lawrence and the JSN radiographic grading systems found no clinical difference between the 2 systems regarding the sensitivities, although the specificity was greater for the JSN system. Conclusions The ability to detect knee osteoarthritis continues to be difficult without using advanced imaging. However, as an inexpensive screening tool, the 45° flexion PA view is more sensitive than the standing AP view to detect severe tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. When evaluating the radiograph for severe osteoarthritis using either the Kellgren-Lawrence or JSN grading system, there is no clinical difference in the sensitivity between the 2 methods; however, the JSN may be more specific for ruling in severe osteoarthritis in the medial compartment. Level of Evidence Level I, systematic review of Level I studies.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the association between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of tunnel communication and increased graft signal intensity (SI) and clinical evaluation of knee stability and outcome after double-bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods Fifty-nine patients were evaluated with 1.5 T MRI and with clinical evaluation 2 years after DB ACL reconstruction. The MRI finding of tunnel communication was defined as the absence of a bony bridge between the anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) tunnels. The SI of the intra-articular portion of both grafts was analyzed on proton-density (PD)-weighted and T2-weighted images and graded on a scale, with I being a normal SI similar to that of the posterior cruciate ligament, II being > 50% of the graft having a normal SI, and III being < 50% of the graft having a normal SI. The clinical evaluation of knee stability and function included KT-1,000 arthrometric side-to-side difference, pivot shift test, and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm knee evaluation scores. The association between the MRI findings and the clinical findings was calculated using the Fisher exact test and the 2-tailed t test. Results Tunnel communication was seen in the femur in 10% of patients and in the tibia in 27% of patients. Increased graft SI was seen in 15% of the AM grafts and 59% of the PL grafts. No statistically significant association (P < .05) between the MRI findings of tunnel communication or increased graft SI and knee laxity was found. Conclusions The MRI findings of tunnel communication or increased graft SI were not associated with knee laxity 2 years after DB ACL reconstruction. Tibial tunnel communication was associated with increased range of movement with flexion, and increased AM graft SI was associated with reduced range of flexion in the knee. Level of Evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose This study was conducted to assess whether a single-row suture anchor repair of a bony Bankart lesion comprising 19% of the glenoid length restores peak translational force and glenoid depth compared with the intact shoulder. Methods Nine thawed adult cadaveric shoulders were dissected and mounted in 45° of abduction and 30° of external rotation. A bony Bankart lesion was simulated with an anterior longitudinal osteotomy, parallel to the superoinferior axis of the glenoid, equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length. The humeral head was displaced 10 mm anteriorly at a speed of 2 mm/s with a 50-N compressive load applied. Testing was performed with the glenoid intact, a simulated lesion, and the lesion repaired with 3 single-row suture anchors. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) peak translational force and glenoid depth were reported. The Friedman test and post hoc comparisons with the Wilcoxon signed rank test were used for between-group analyses. Results Peak translational force decreased after osteotomy (13.7 N; IQR, 9.6 to 15.5 N; P = .01) and increased after the repair (18.3 N; IQR, 18.3 to 20.6 N; P = .01) compared with the intact shoulder (23.7 N; IQR, 16.4 to 29.9 N). Glenoid depth significantly decreased after the osteotomy (0.2 mm; IQR, −0.6 to 0.7 mm) compared with baseline (1.7 mm; IQR, 1.3 to 2.0 mm; P = .01) and increased after repair (0.8 mm; IQR, 0.1 to 1.0 mm; P = .03) compared with the osteotomized shoulder. The glenoid depth of the repair was less than the baseline value (P = .01). Conclusions Repair of an anterior bony Bankart lesion equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length with 3 suture anchors restored the peak translational force needed to anteriorly displace the humerus relative to the glenoid; however, this technique failed to restore the natural glenoid depth in a laboratory setting. Clinical Relevance Our findings describe the inability of a single-row suture anchor repair to provide anatomic fixation of the bony Bankart lesion equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 12/2014;