Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery

Publisher: Arthroscopy Association of North America; International Society of Arthroscopy, Knee Surgery, and Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, WB Saunders

Journal description

Nowhere is minimally invasive surgery explained better than in Arthroscopy, the leading peer-reviewed journal in the field. Every issue enables you to put into perspective the usefulness of the various emerging arthroscopic techniques. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods -- along with their applications in various situations -- are discussed in relation to their efficiency, efficacy and cost benefit. New in 2000 - paid subscribers to the journal also receive access to the journal's expanded website. New online features include full text of all articles, video clips, short reports, and Medline links to related articles.

Current impact factor: 3.19

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 3.191
2012 Impact Factor 3.103
2011 Impact Factor 3.024
2010 Impact Factor 3.317
2009 Impact Factor 2.608
2008 Impact Factor 2.503
2007 Impact Factor 2.296
2006 Impact Factor 1.574
2005 Impact Factor 1.42
2004 Impact Factor 1.582
2003 Impact Factor 1.616
2002 Impact Factor 1.799
2001 Impact Factor 1.313
2000 Impact Factor 1.217
1999 Impact Factor 1.318
1998 Impact Factor 0.806
1997 Impact Factor 0.959
1996 Impact Factor 1.296
1995 Impact Factor 0.524

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.51
Cited half-life 7.20
Immediacy index 0.67
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 1.10
Website Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery website
Other titles Online short reports., Arthroscopy (Online), Arthroscopy
ISSN 1526-3231
OCLC 42084448
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

WB Saunders

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject-based repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • 'WB Saunders' is an imprint of 'Elsevier'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: With or without cells, scaffold-based cartilage treatments show promising results. Clinical study focuses on autologous stem cells, but in vitro, basic science biologics research favors mesenchymal stem cells. MSCs vary by cell type and concentration, and may be expanded ex vivo. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; 31(4). DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.02.014
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    ABSTRACT: Arthritis treatment must be analyzed with regard to outcome. Pain is one important outcome measure. Pain relief is variable among individual patients; individually discerning, personalized, or precision medical indications for nonsurgical treatment of osteoarthritis must be more specifically determined. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; 31(4). DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.02.012
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    ABSTRACT: Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) shows greater durability, lower failure rates, and is effective for larger lesions, compared with microfracture. In addition, membrane-ACI (M-ACI) is technically simpler with fewer complications of cartilage hypertrophy than first-generation ACI using periosteum. However, second-generation, M-ACI is not yet approved for general use in the United States. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; 31(4). DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.02.018
  • Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; 31(4). DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2014.11.036
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    ABSTRACT: Fracture biology healing requires scaffolds, growth factors, and cells. Biologics definitions are clarified in terms of osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity, and osteogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; 31(4). DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.02.016
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    ABSTRACT: First, editorial commentary: editorial commentary may be educational and may be controversial, but above all else, authors come first. Second, The Spin Move: The Spin Move is effective, cost-effective, and ubiquitous because, while many techniques are specific to a single joint, The Spin Move can be performed as a part of any arthroscopic and related procedure. However, like many advanced procedures, The Spin Move, when poorly executed, entails substantial risk. Preoperative planning is essential, and The Spin Move must be reviewed by inexperienced practitioners, in detailed text, figures tables, and video, at www.arthroscopytechniques.org. Practice makes perfect. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; 31(4). DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.02.015
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    ABSTRACT: Tri-calcium phosphate, calcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite/tri-calcium phosphate, or hydroxyapatite synthetic graft choices are associated with favorable outcomes for high tibial osteotomy, particularly in contrast to allograft. Smokers are at high risk of complications. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; 31(4). DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.02.017
  • Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; 31(4). DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.02.002
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    ABSTRACT: To compare diameter-based glenoid bone loss quantification with a true geometric calculation for the area of a circular segment. By use of Maxima 12.01.0 mathematics modeling software (Macysma, Boston, MA), the diameter-based glenoid bone loss equation (% Bone loss = [Defect width (w)/Inferior glenoid circle diameter (D)] × 100%) was compared with a true geometric calculation for the area of a circular segment of the glenoid (Wolfram Research, Champaign, IL) rearranged in terms of w and D: Percent bone loss = (100/2π) (2 × arccos [1 - 2 (w/D)] - sin {2 × arccos [1 - 2 (w/D)]}). Percent error was calculated by taking the difference between the diameter equation and the true geometric calculation at varying true glenoid defect widths (w) (0% to 50% of diameter). The commonly used diameter equation overestimated true glenoid bone loss at all values of w except at 0% and 50% of the diameter. The mean overestimation error was 3.9% ± 1.9% (range, 0.0% to 5.8%), with the maximum error occurring when w was 20% of the diameter: At this value, w/D × 100% (diameter equation) predicts 20% bone loss when true bone loss is actually 14.2%. Diameter-based glenoid bone loss quantification overestimates true glenoid bone loss, with the maximum error occurring when theorized bone loss is 20%. To address situations for which a diameter-based bone loss quantification method must be performed or to improve the accuracy of surface-area calculations in previous diameter-based bone loss estimations, a corrective factor can be applied. Clinicians quantifying glenoid loss to make treatment decisions should be aware of the measurement methods used in the biomechanical studies on which they are basing their surgical decisions. Diameter-based glenoid bone loss quantification overestimates true glenoid bone loss, with the maximum error occurring when theorized bone loss is 20%, a commonly used threshold for bone grafting. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; 31(4). DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.02.020
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    ABSTRACT: Autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is promising for osteoarthritis pain and may effect cartilage repair. Platelets are growth factor factories. Commercially available PRP is heterogeneous. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; 31(4). DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.02.011
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoarticular (OA) transplant hyaline cartilage may deteriorate, and ultimately result in "fibrocartilage" at 2 years. Long-term OA transplant outcomes may be inferior to autologous chondrocyte transplantation, yet this conclusion is based on a single, prospective comparative study. The promise of an ideally conceived, tissue-engineered, OA transplantation graft remains distant. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; 31(4). DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.02.019
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    ABSTRACT: Osteochondral (OC) allografts are an effective treatment for large OC lesions. OC allografts are hyaline. Allograft limitations and OC graft limitations are well known. Five year survivorship is similar to autologous chondrocyte implantation. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; 31(4). DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.02.013
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome, return to sporting activity, and postoperative articular cartilage and bony morphology of shoulders that underwent arthroscopic suture anchor repair of bony Bankart lesions. The inclusion criteria for this retrospective study were anterior glenoid rim fractures after traumatic shoulder instability that were treated with arthroscopic suture anchor repair. Patients were surveyed by a questionnaire including sport-specific outcome, Rowe score, Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, and Oxford Instability Score. Three-tesla magnetic resonance imaging could be performed in 30 patients to assess osseous integration, glenoid reconstruction, and signs of osteoarthritis. From November 1999 to April 2010, 81 patients underwent an anterior bony Bankart repair in our department (50 arthroscopic suture anchor repairs, 5 arthroscopic screw fixations, and 26 open repairs). The 55 arthroscopic repairs comprised a consecutive cohort of patients treated by a single surgeon. Of the 50 patients in the suture anchor group, 45 (90%) were available for evaluation. At 82 ± 31 months postoperatively, the mean Rowe score was 85.9 ± 20.5 points, the mean Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index score was 89.4% ± 14.7%, and the mean Oxford Instability Score was 13.6 ± 5.4 points. Compared with the contralateral shoulder, all scores showed a significantly reduced outcome (P < .001, P < .001, and P < .001, respectively). A redislocation occurred in 3 patients (6.6%). Regarding satisfaction, 35 patients (78%) were very satisfied, 9 (20%) were satisfied, and 1 was partly satisfied. Overall, 95% of patients returned to any sporting activity after surgery. The number of sports disciplines (P < .001), duration (P = .005), level (P = .02), and risk category (P = .013) showed a significant reduction compared with the pretrauma condition. However, only 19% of patients reported that shoulder complaints were the reason for the reduction in activity. Nonunion occurred in 16.6%, with a higher frequency in patients with chronic lesions (P = .031). Anatomic reduction was achieved in 72%, the medial step-off in patients with nonanatomic reduction averaged 1.8 ± 0.9 mm, and the remaining glenoid defect size averaged 6.8% ± 7.3%. Full-thickness cartilage defects of the anterior glenoid were detected in 70% of patients. Arthroscopic suture anchor repair may enable an anatomic reduction of bony Bankart lesions with no or only minimal articular steps and provides successful midterm outcomes concerning clinical scores, recurrence, and patient satisfaction. The return to activity is limited for various, mostly non-shoulder-related causes. Chronic lesions may have an inferior healing potential; therefore early surgical stabilization of acute Bankart fragments is suggested to avoid possible nonunion. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.03.005
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to evaluate the quantity and quality of articles from different countries involving arthroscopy to investigate the characteristics of worldwide research productivity. Web of Science was searched for arthroscopy articles published between 1999 and 2013. The numbers of articles and citations were analyzed to assess the contributions of different countries. Publication activity was adjusted by country population and gross domestic product (GDP). A total of 12,553 articles were published worldwide. The time trend for the number of articles showed an increase of 2.27-fold between 1999 and 2013. North America, Western Europe, and Eastern Asia were the most productive areas. High-income countries published 90.86% of the articles; middle-income countries, 9.11%; and lower-income countries, only 0.02%. The United States published the most articles (35.40%), followed by Germany (9.53%), the United Kingdom (6.80%), the Republic of Korea (5.45%), and Japan (4.76%), and had the highest total citations (78,161). However, Sweden had the highest mean citations (35.56), followed by Switzerland (23.39) and the Netherlands (18.90). There were positive correlations between the number of publications and population/GDP (P < .01). When normalized to population, Switzerland ranked the highest, followed by Finland and Sweden. When adjusted by GDP, the Republic of Korea ranked first, followed by Finland and Turkey. The number of publications on arthroscopy increased significantly from 1999 to 2013, with a more than 2-fold increase in volume. The United States was the most productive country as measured by total publications, but when adjusted for population, Switzerland published the highest number of articles, followed by Finland and Sweden. When publications were adjusted for GDP, the Republic of Korea ranked first, with Finland second and Turkey third. Bibliometric analysis allows us to understand contributions of different world regions in scientific research in the field of arthroscopy and gives insight into the quantity and quality of articles related to arthroscopy. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.03.009
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether an acetabular labral repair technique would be superior to another repair technique based on clinical outcomes measured by patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores. We identified 465 patients who underwent labral base repair or circumferential suture repair from February 2008 to February 2012. The type of repair performed was based on labral size and tear type. The 2 groups were pair matched for age within 5 years, sex, crossover sign within 15%, coxa profunda, Workers' Compensation status, and microfracture (femur, acetabulum, or none). Data were prospectively collected and retrospectively reviewed. PROs included a visual analog scale score and the modified Harris Hip Score, Non-Arthritic Hip Score, Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living, and Hip Outcome Score-Sports-Specific Subscale. One hundred ten patients met the inclusion criteria for labral base repair and were pair matched on a 1:1 basis with 110 patients who underwent circumferential suture repair. The mean follow-up period was 30 months for both groups, with a range of 19.2 to 60 months for the labral base repair group and 19.2 to 67 months for the circumferential suture repair group. Radiographic data were similar between groups with respect to the lateral center-edge angle (P = .906), acetabular inclination (P = .329), anterior center-edge angle (P = .208), alpha angle (P = .387), and joint space width (P = .388). All preoperative PRO scores were statistically similar. Both groups showed significant improvements in all PROs. There were no statistical differences in postoperative PRO scores at latest follow-up (modified Harris Hip Score, P = .215; Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living, P = .839; Hip Outcome Score-Sports-Specific Subscale, P = .561; Non-Arthritic Hip Score, P = .333; visual analog scale score, P = .373; and satisfaction, P = .483). There were similar rates of revision (n = 10 for both groups) and conversion to arthroplasty (n = 2 for both groups). On the basis of PRO scores at 2 years' follow-up, there is no difference in outcomes based on the type of labral repair performed. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.03.004
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the best angle to drill the femoral tunnels of the superficial medial collateral ligament (sMCL) and posterior oblique ligament (POL) with concomitant posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction to avoid either short tunnels or tunnel collisions. Eight cadaveric knees were studied. Double-bundle PCL femoral tunnels were arthroscopically drilled. Drilling of the sMCL and POL tunnels was performed in 4 different combinations of 0° and 30° axial (anteriorly directed) and coronal (proximally directed) angulations. Specimens were scanned with computed tomography to document the relations of the sMCL and POL tunnels to the intercondylar notch and PCL tunnels. A minimum tunnel length of 25 mm was required. When the sMCL femoral tunnel was drilled at 0° axial and 30° coronal (proximally directed) angulations or 30° axial (anteriorly directed) and 0° coronal angulations, the risk of tunnel collision with the PCL tunnels increased in comparison with the remaining evaluated angulations (P < .001). No POL tunnels collided with either PCL tunnel bundle with the exception of tunnels drilled at 0° axial and 30° coronal (proximally directed) angulations, which did so in 3 of 8 cases (P < .001). The minimum required tunnel length was obtained in all the sMCL and POL tunnels (P < .001 and P = .02, respectively). However, some of those angled at 0° on the axial plane violated the intercondylar notch. When one is performing posteromedial reconstructions with concomitant PCL procedures, the sMCL and POL femoral tunnels should be drilled anteriorly and proximally at both 30° axial and 30° coronal angulations. The POL femoral tunnel may also be angled 0° in the coronal plane. Tunnels at 0° axial angulations showed a shorter distance to the intercondylar notch and a higher risk of collision with the PCL tunnels. Specific drilling angles are necessary to avoid short tunnels or collisions between the drilled tunnels when sMCL and POL femoral tunnels are placed with concomitant PCL reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.03.007
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and the Single Assessment Numerical Evaluation (SANE) scores after rotator cuff repair, rotator cuff revision, and SLAP repair. This study was a retrospective review of a prospectively filled database of 262 patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery for rotator cuff tears or SLAP lesions between 1999 and 2007. All patients were operated on by the same surgeon, with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. The patient database included preoperative and outcome measures, such as pain, range of motion, and notably postoperative ASES and SANE scores. Any patient with incomplete data was removed from the study. Three groups were identified: primary rotator cuff repair (n = 135), rotator cuff revision (n = 73), and SLAP repair (n = 54). The overall mean ASES and SANE scores after surgery were 82.7 (± 20.2) and 83.3 (± 19.6), respectively. The Pearson correlation coefficient (r) between both scores was 0.8 (P < .001), demonstrating a very good correlation. In subgroup analysis, the correlation was highest in the cuff revision group (r = 0.88; P < .001) followed by the SLAP group (r = 0.78; P < .001) and primary cuff group (r = 0.75; P < .001). This study shows that there is a significant correlation between postoperative SANE and ASES rating methods in rotator cuff and SLAP repairs. We recommend the SANE score as a reliable outcome indicator for iterative follow-up, which can then be combined with a more clinically informative score such as the ASES or other process-based scores for preoperative and final workup. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.03.010
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the initial minimal tension for restoring knee stability during double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in vivo. Patients who underwent primary double-bundle ACL reconstruction with an autologous semitendinosus tendon during 2012 were included. The bundles were fixed to a graft-tensioning system during surgery. Initial graft tensions were set to the following tensions per 6 mm in graft diameter: (1) 30 N, (2) 25 N, and (3) 20 N. Bundle tension was recorded during knee flexion-extension and in response to anterior or rotatory loads. In addition, anterior knee laxity was measured with the KT-1000 arthrometer (MEDmetric, San Diego, CA), and the pivot-shift test was evaluated. Sixty patients were evaluated. The tension curves of both bundles among different initial tension settings were significantly different (P < .0001), with the tension in the 30-N setting being highest and that in the 20-N setting being lowest. The tension in both bundles showed reciprocal pattern during flexion-extension (P = .019). The tension of the posterolateral bundle graft was significantly lower than that of the anteromedial bundle graft in response to the anterior load at all settings (P = .0017, P = .0019, and P = .0021 at 30° in the 30-N, 25-N, and 20-N settings, respectively, and P < .0001 at 90° at all settings), whereas the tensions in both bundles in response to rotatory loads were equivalent. Two cases showed a grade 1 pivot shift in the 20-N setting, whereas no case showed a positive pivot shift in the other settings. KT measurements in the 30-N and 25-N settings showed no difference. In double-bundle ACL reconstruction, initial tension could be set as low as 25 N; however, initial tension of 20 N is not recommended because it might result in residual pivot shift in some cases, although the pivot-shift difference was not significant. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.03.012
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether the local application of platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) in hydrogel sheets would promote healing and improve histologic characteristics and biomechanical strength after rotator cuff (RC) repair in rats. To assess the effect of PDGF-BB on tendon-to-bone healing we divided 36 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with bilateral surgery to repair the supraspinatus tendon at its insertion site into 3 groups: group 1 = suture-only group; group 2 = suture and gelatin hydrogel sheets impregnated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS); and group 3 = suture and gelatin hydrogel sheets impregnated with PDGF-BB (0.5 μg). Semiquantitative histologic evaluation was carried out 2, 6, and 12 weeks later; cell proliferation was assessed 2 and 6 weeks postoperatively by immunostaining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and biomechanical testing, including ultimate load to failure, stiffness, and ultimate stress to failure, was performed 12 weeks after the operation. At 2 weeks, the average percentage of PCNA-positive cells at the insertion site was significantly higher in group 3 (40.5% ± 2.4%) than in group 1 (32.1% ± 6.9%; P = .03) and group 2 (31.9% ± 3.7%; P = .02). At 2 and 6 weeks, the histologic scores were similar among the 3 groups. At 12 weeks, the histologic score was significantly higher in group 3 (10.3 ± 0.8) than in group 1 (8.5 ± 0.5; P = .002) or group 2 (8.8 ± 0.8; P = .009), whereas ultimate load to failure, stiffness, and ultimate load to stress (normal control population, 44.73 ± 9.75 N, 27.59 ± 4.32 N/mm, and 21.33 ± 4.65 N/mm(2), respectively) were significantly higher in group 3 (28.28 ± 6.28 N, 11.05 ± 2.37 N/mm, and 7.99 ± 2.13 N/mm(2), respectively) than in group 1 (10.44 ± 1.98 N, 4.74 ± 1.31 N/mm, and 3.28 ± 1.27 N/mm(2), respectively; all P < .001) or group 2 (11.85 ± 2.89 N, 5.86 ± 1.75 N/mm, and 3.31 ± 0.80 N/mm(2), respectively; all P < .001). The placement of a PDGF-BB-impregnated hydrogel sheet just lateral to a transected and acutely reattached supraspinatus tendon produced significantly more PCNA-positive cells at 2 weeks and greater collagen fiber orientation, ultimate failure loads, stiffness, and stress to failure at 12 weeks than did a PBS-impregnated hydrogel sheet. No differences in vascularity or cellularity were observed. The local application of PDGF-BB-impregnated gelatin hydrogel may help to promote tendon-to-bone healing after RC repair in humans. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.arthro.2015.03.008