Psychoanalytic Social Work (Psychoanal Soc Work )

Publisher: Haworth Press

Description

Discontinued.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Psychoanalytic Social Work website
  • Other titles
    Psychoanalytic social work
  • ISSN
    1522-8878
  • OCLC
    40476150
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Haworth Press

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article offers a selective review of literature on the use of improvisation and play to promote “the bursting forth from the unknown in the moment” (Kindler, 2010, p. 224) in what I term the “theater of psychotherapy.” It presents an innovative Meditative Dialogue process through which clients and their t herapists are able to cultivate and access this “theater” as they co-create creative spaces in which transformative experiences are accessible. A brief vignette offers an illustration of how the Meditative Dialogue process helps to develop intimacy, presence, and focus through a collaborative positioning of curiosity, openness, and enlivenment in the therapeutic relationship. KEYWORDS collaboration, creativity, improvisation, mindfulness, play, sacred space, spirituality
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Eating disorders are no longer considered isolated or single symptom disorders. Numerous authors have noted difficulties categorizing and treating these “refractory” disorders, and over the past three decades the number of techniques, ideas, and approaches available to address these issues has expanded exponentially. While this provides therapists with a wide range of possible interventions, it also leaves open the question of how to choose from this wide field of possibilities. In this discussion I offer some ideas about bringing together disparate, even contradictory, therapeutic ideas and techniques into a relatively cohesive frame which will enhance the work of any therapist with clients with eating disorders.
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article proposes that an important aspect in treating adults with early parental loss is helping them retrieve a positive inner sense of the deceased parent. Not having an inner representation of the parent is experienced as a double loss: the actual loss due to death, and additionally, the loss due to a lack of memory and inner connection to the deceased. Access to memories and inner representations are often lost in the process of defending against layers of pain experienced at the death of the parent. This article first discusses salient issues to be dealt with when treating such adults and then speaks to the value of therapeutic work which encourages retrieving memories and positive identifications with the deceased parent.
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: While skin can be expressive of self-representation, skin can also be the origin of self-representations and of particular problems in self-representation. The significant part that skin has played in a four-year psychoanalysis is described. The article then focuses on one function of skin, that of containment, and relates this containment function to the patient's sense of herself and to thoughts about psychoanalytic work.
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article considers daydreams as a means of understanding the patient and fostering the therapeutic relationship. Daydreams are considered along with fantasies and reverie. The usefulness of the therapist's reverie in response to the daydreams of a patient who is conflicted about being seen and known is explored. Daydreams are considered in relation to creativity—both analytic and artistic; and as a way of bridging inner life and external reality.
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The parent–therapist relationship is one of the most important facets of child psychotherapy. Guilt and shame are common sources of rupture between parents and child therapists. Overlooking such ruptures with parents can interfere with or even halt psychotherapy with children. A review of empirical and theoretical literature on ruptures in the therapeutic relationship is followed by discussion of how clinicians might identify guilt- and shame-based ruptures in the parent–therapist relationship. The process of repairing parent-therapist ruptures is emphasized as one process that can assist parental growth and development, which in turn can create space for children to grow and develop in tandem with their parent(s). A case study illustrates how guilt and shame manifest in the form of a race-based rupture in the parent–therapist relationship. A discussion of guilt, shame, and oppression concludes this article.
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A hunger for ecstatic experience is happening right under our radar, but little attention has been paid to what is that strange state of mind known as ecstasy. Some will take life-threatening risks to attain it. The implication for mental health professionals and others concerned about those hungry for ecstasy is profound. If unable to identify and understand this phenomenon, they will be incapable of intervening optimally with many patients and loved ones, and lives may be lost.
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article introduces and describes the virtual holding environment—a space where supportive relationships can be developed and maintained through the use of technology over time—and its role in helping us thrive during our doctoral program, dissertation process, and subsequent career transitions. Here, we present concepts related to computer-mediated communication, distance education, and psychodynamic theory (Winnicott's holding environment, Bowlby's attachment theory, and Fonagy's mentalization/intersubjective process) that have helped shape this virtual holding environment. Also, we present individual vignettes that illustrate the role this virtual holding environment has played in our shared successes. Our partnership offers collaborative principles that may be applied to other forms of education and training which require independent work, yet benefit from mutual ongoing support. We provide several recommendations for strengthening learning experiences and computer-mediated communication across distance.
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Writing offers opportunities to remember, witness, honor, memorialize, and work through various permutations of trauma and loss. The author demonstrates, via clinical and personal vignettes, how finding a “literal voice” can deepen and advance the treatment in unique ways for both the patient and the therapist. Analytic termination is also explored as a preparatory experience for dealing with subsequent parental loss. Various theorists as well as literary sources are cited to further illustrate creative ways to deal with the mourning process.
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article discusses disability as a neglected aspect of cultural competency in the diversity literature. It identifies some of the sociocultural concepts that contribute to the avoidance of people with disabilities in the general population, the psychodynamic and psychoanalytic profession, literature, and discourse. Personal and cultural aspects of unanalyzed countertransference and transference are examined. The impact of those internalized sociocultural concepts on the clinical dyad is also explored. Through anecdote, parallel processing, and the literature, it will be shown how some of the transference issues toward the disabled clinician can become assets in the therapeutic alliance.
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Drawing on recent theory of the origin and development of gender orientation, this article explores the dynamics in the treatment of a 16-year-old female to male transgender adolescent. The debate over whether surgery, to change the body, or psychotherapy, to change the mind, is the appropriate treatment became a central conflict for the therapist in understanding the dynamics of her transgender patient whose goal was to be “cleared for surgery.”
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2014; 21.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article continues the project begun in the previous article titled: “The Self as a Complex Adaptive System. Part I: Complexity, Metapsychology, and Developmental Theories” (Palombo, 2013). Using systems theory and a complexity perspective, that article provided a critique of psychoanalytic developmental theories. This contribution addresses some of the methodological issues related to data collection on development and the effects of the observer on the observed. It introduces the Level of Analysis perspective as a heuristic that permits the use of a complexity view applicable to the construct of the self as a complex adaptive system. It proposes three levels, each of which is associated with a platform from which phenomena are observed, a neuropsychological level (L-1), an introspective level (L-2), and an interpersonal level (L-3). The article concludes with a plea for a unifying psychoanalytic paradigm that brings together the data from these three levels and that would lay the groundwork for a clinical theory that would bring together the major existing psychoanalytic theories.
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2013; 20(2).
  • Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2013; 20(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence-based treatment (EBT) supports different types of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Yet, a growing body of evidence shows a high therapy dropout rate and non-response rate among PTSD patients, especially patients with complex PTSD. A different, short-term therapeutic approach is therefore needed which combines CBT and psychodynamic therapy (PDT) because it is better for patients with chronic and/or complex PTSD to work with clarified stages and an end of treatment in mind. The patient's mental structure is conceptualized as a continuum, and functional problems are regarded as stemming from cognitive structures and unresolved developmental conflict. The five phases of the phenomenon of hope model proposed in an earlier article—a connection phase; an agency and pathway phase (developing a goal-oriented decision-making pattern and learning to plan toward goal achievement); a reconstruction phase; a phase of processing the conflict characteristic of PTSD by utilizing the natural power of hope; and a summary and separation phase—advance a short-term therapy that combines CBT and PDT techniques. This integrated therapy is based on notes that were kept relating to the case study of a chronic PTSD patient.
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2013; 20(2).
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    ABSTRACT: This article examines the term potential space in the therapeutic session and the pathological situations in which this space collapses. The article suggests that such failures occur in the weaving of transference and countertransference between patient and therapist. The potential to free and repair this space can be found in emotional thinking that occurs between the therapist and the patient. When the object-therapist can play or dream, the infant-patient can do so too. Thus, a new shared experience may be created in the therapeutic session and in the patient's mind. This article reviews the different types of collapse of the potential space, as suggested by Ogden, and offers a new additional type.
    Psychoanalytic Social Work 01/2013; 20(2).