Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology (Arch Insect Biochem Physiol )

Publisher: Entomological Society of America, John Wiley and Sons

Description

Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology is an international journal that publishes articles in English that are of interest to insect biochemists and physiologists. Generally these articles will be in or related to one of the following subject areas: Endocrinology Development Neurobiology Behavior Pharmacology Nutrition Carbohydrates Lipids Enzymes Proteins Peptides Nucleic Acids Molecular Biology Toxicology. ARCHIVES will publish only original articles. Articles that are confirmatory in nature or deal with analytical methods previously described will not be accepted.

  • Impact factor
    1.52
  • 5-year impact
    1.38
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.13
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.37
  • Website
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology website
  • Other titles
    Archives of insect biochemistry and physiology., Supplement., Archives of insect biochemistry and physiology (Online), Archives of insect biochemistry and physiology, Insect biochemistry and physiology
  • ISSN
    1520-6327
  • OCLC
    43007046
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

John Wiley and Sons

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • On personal web site or secure external website at authors institution
    • Deposit in institutional repositories is not allowed
    • JASIST authors may deposit in an institutional repository
    • Non-commercial
    • Pre-print must be accompanied with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'John Wiley and Sons' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Prophenoloxidase (PPO) is an essential enzyme in insect innate immunity because of its role in humoral defense. In this study, we have cloned a full-length cDNA of Antheraea pernyi prophenoloxidase (ApPPO) with an open-reading frame encoding 683 amino acids, and the deduced amino acid sequence of ApPPO exhibited a high similarity with those of lepidoptera. The expression of ApPPO was inducible so that the mRNA level was significantly upregulated in the microbial challenged tissues, including fat body, hemocytes, and midgut. To better investigate the enzymatic and immunological properties of ApPPO, recombinant ApPPO (rApPPO) was produced in Escherichia coli. Several functional verification experiments were performed after studying the enzymatic properties. It was found that rApPPO could be stimulated by the microbial challenged larvae hemolymph and then killed bacteria in the radial diffusion assay. Furthermore, rApPPO also induced the transcription of cecropins after injected into the larvae 24 h later.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 01/2015; 88(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Host animals combat invading pathogens by activating various immune responses. Modulation of the immune pathways by cytokines is critical for efficient pathogen elimination. Insects and mammals possess common innate immune systems, and individual immune pathways have been intensively studied over the last two decades. Relatively less attention, however, has been focused on the functions of cytokines in insect innate immunity. Here, we summarize our recent findings from studies of the insect cytokine, paralytic peptide, in the silkworm Bombyx mori. The content of this report was presented at the First Asian Invertebrate Immunity Symposium. Acute activation of paralytic peptide occurs via proteolysis after stimulation with the cell wall components of pathogens, leading to the induction of a wide range of cellular and humoral immune responses. The pathogenic bacterium Serratia marcescens suppresses paralytic peptide-dependent immune activation, which impairs host resistance. Studies of insect cytokines will broaden our understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying the interaction between host innate immunity and pathogenic agents.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 01/2015; 88(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Symbiotic bacteria are common in insects and intimately affect the various aspects of insect host biology. In a number of insect symbiosis models, it has been possible to elucidate the effects of the symbiont on host biology, whereas there is a limited understanding of the impact of the association on the bacterial symbiont, mainly due to the difficulty of cultivating insect symbionts in vitro. Furthermore, the molecular features that determine the establishment and persistence of the symbionts in their host (i.e., symbiotic factors) have remained elusive. However, the recently established model, the bean bug Riptortus pedestris, provides a good opportunity to study bacterial symbiotic factors at a molecular level through their cultivable symbionts. Bean bugs acquire genus Burkholderia cells from the environment and harbor them as gut symbionts in the specialized posterior midgut. The genome of the Burkholderia symbiont was sequenced, and the genomic information was used to generate genetically manipulated Burkholderia symbiont strains. Using mutant symbionts, we identified several novel symbiotic factors necessary for establishing a successful association with the host gut. In this review, these symbiotic factors are classified into three categories based on the colonization dynamics of the mutant symbiont strains: initiation, accommodation, and persistence factors. In addition, the molecular characteristics of the symbiotic factors are described. These newly identified symbiotic factors and on-going studies of the Riptortus–Burkholderia symbiosis are expected to contribute to the understanding of the molecular cross-talk between insects and bacterial symbionts that are of ecological and evolutionary importance.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 01/2015; 88(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Organisms are known to be equipped with an adaptive plasticity as the phenotype of traits in response to the imposed environmental challenges as they grow and develop. In this study, the effects of extreme changes in oxygen availability and atmospheric pressure on physiological phenotypes of Drosophila melanogaster were investigated to explore adaptation mechanisms. The changes in citrate synthase activity (CSA), lifespan, and behavioral function in different atmospheric conditions were evaluated. In the CAS test, hyperoxia significantly increased CSA; both hypoxia and hyperbaric conditions caused a significant decrease in CSA. In the survivorship test, all changed atmospheric conditions caused a significant reduction in lifespan. The lifespan reduced more after hypoxia exposure than after hyperbaria exposure. In behavioral function test, when mechanical agitation was conducted, bang-sensitive flies showed a stereotypical sequence of initial muscle spasm, paralysis, and recovery. The percentage of individuals that displayed paralysis or seizure was measured on the following day and after 2 weeks from each exposure. The majority of flies showed seizure behavior 15 days after exposure, especially after 3 h of exposure. The percentage of individuals that did not undergo paralysis or seizure and was able to move in the vial, was also tested. The number of flies that moved and raised the higher level of the vial decreased after exposure. Animal's speed decreased significantly 15 days after exposure to extreme environmental conditions. In summary, the alteration of oxygen availability and atmospheric pressure may lead to significant changes in mitochondria mass, lifespan, and behavioral function in D. melanogaster. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Serine protease inhibitors (PIs) have been described in many plant species and are universal throughout the plant kingdom, where trypsin inhibitors is the most common type. In the present study, trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory activity was detected in the seed flour extracts of 13 selected cultivars/accessions of cowpea. Two cowpea cultivars, Cream7 and Buff, were found to have higher trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory potential compared to other tested cultivars for which they have been selected for further purification studies using ammonium sulfate fractionation and DEAE-Sephadex A-25 column. Cream7-purified proteins showed two bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) corresponding to molecular mass of 17.10 and 14.90 kDa, while the purified protein from Buff cultivar showed a single band corresponding mass of 16.50 kDa. The purified inhibitors were stable at temperature below 60°C and were active at wide range of pH from 2 to 12. The kinetic analysis revealed noncompetitive type of inhibition for both inhibitors against both enzymes. The inhibitor constant (Ki ) values suggested high affinity between inhibitors and enzymes. Purified inhibitors were found to have deep and negative effects on the mean larval weight, larval mortality, pupation, and mean pupal weight of Spodoptera littoralis, where Buff PI was more effective than Cream7 PI. It may be concluded that cowpea PI gene(s) could be potential insect control protein for future studies in developing insect-resistant transgenic plants. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The ATPsyn-b encoding for subunit b of ATP synthase in Drosophila melanogaster is proposed to act in ATP synthesis and phagocytosis, and has been identified as one of the sperm proteins in both Drosophila and mammals. At present, its details of functions in animal growth and spermatogenesis have not been reported. In this study, we knocked down ATPsyn-b using Drosophila lines expressing inducible hairpin RNAi constructs and Gal4 drivers. Ubiquitous knockdown of ATPsyn-b resulted in growth defects in larval stage as the larvae did not grow bigger than the size of normal second-instar larvae. Knockdown in testes did not interrupt the developmental excursion to viable adult flies, however, these male adults were sterile. Analyses of testes revealed disrupted nuclear bundles during spermatogenesis and abnormal shaping in spermatid elongation. There were no mature sperm in the seminal vesicle of ATPsyn-b knockdown male testes. These findings suggest us that ATPsyn-b acts in growth and male fertility of Drosophila.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This report concerns the effect of heat shock on host–pathogen interaction in Galleria mellonella infected with Bacillus thuringiensis. We show enhanced activity against Gram-positive bacteria in the hemolymph of larvae pre-exposed to heat shock before infection with B. thuringiensis. Heat shock influenced the protein pattern in the hemolymph of infected larvae: more peptides with a molecular weight below 10 kDa were detected in comparison with nonshocked animals. Additionally, we noticed that the amount of apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) in the hemolymph decreased transiently following infection, which was considerably higher in larvae pre-exposed to heat shock. On the other hand, its expression in the fat body showed a consequent infection-induced decline, observed equally in shocked and nonshocked animals. This suggests that the amount of apoLp-III in the hemolymph of G. mellonella larvae is regulated at multiple levels. We also report that this protein is more resistant to degradation in the hemolymph of larvae pre-exposed to heat shock in comparison to nonshocked larvae. Two-dimensional analysis revealed the presence of three isoforms of apoLp-III, all susceptible to proteolytic degradation. However, one of them was the most abundant, both in the protease-treated and untreated hemolymph. Taking into consideration that, in general, apoLp-III has a stimulative effect on different immune-related hemolymph proteins and peptides, the reported findings bring us closer to understanding the effect of heat shock on the resistance of G. mellonella to infection.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Cecropin A is a novel 37-residue cecropin-like antimicrobial peptide isolated from the cecropia moth, Hyalophora cecropia. We have demonstrated that cecropin A is an antibacterial agent and have investigated its mode of action. In this study, we show that cecropin A has potent antimicrobial activity against 2 multidrug resistant organisms—Acinetobacter baumanii and—Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interactions between cecropin A and membrane phospholipids were studied using tryptophan blue shift experiments. Cecropin A has a strong interaction with bacterial cell mimetic membranes. These results imply that cecropin A has selectivity for bacterial cells. To address the potential the rapeutic efficacy of cecropin A, its anti-inflammatory activities and mode of action in mouse macrophage-derived RAW264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were examined. Cecropin A suppressed nitrite production, mTNF-α, mIL-1β, mMIP-1, and mMIP-2 cytokine release in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, cecropin A inhibited intracellular cell signaling via the ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathway, leading to the prevention of COX-2 expression in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. These results strongly suggest that cecropin A should be investigated as a potential agent for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory diseases.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Males absent on the first (MOF) was originally identified as an essential component of the X chromosome dosage compensation system in Drosophila melanogaster, and is also a member of the MYST family of histone acetyltransferases. MOF has been extensively studied in D. melanogaster and mammals. However, whether MOF is involved in dosage compensation and/or other vital functions for newly emerging model insects such as Tribolium castaneum, is unclear. We cloned the mof from T. castaneum, named Tcmof. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that mof is highly conserved in eukaryotes but lost in birds. qPCR showed that Tcmof was most highly expressed in the early embryo stage and equally expressed in males and females. Treating larvae with ds-Tcmof led 79.1% of the insects to arrest during its eclosion; the remaining insects died either in the larval stage or immediately following eclosion. Treating pupae with the same construct eliminated the fertility of T. castaneum. This effect was rescued by reciprocal crosses with wild-type females, but not males. We infer that the mof gene is essential for larval/pupal development and female fertility in T. castaneum.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Apolipophorin-III (ApoLp-III) acts in lipid transport, lipoprotein metabolism, and innate immunity in insects. In this study, an ApoLp-III gene of Antheraea pernyi pupae (Ap-ApoLp-III) was isolated and characterized. The full-length cDNA of Ap-ApoLp-III is 687 bp, including a 5′-untranslated region (UTR) of 40 bp, 3′-UTR of 86 bp and an open reading frame of 561 bp encoding a polypeptide of 186 amino acids that contains an Apolipophorin-III precursor domain (PF07464). The deduced Ap-apoLp-III protein sequence has 68, 59, and 23% identity with its orthologs of Manduca sexta, Bombyx mori, and Aedes aegypti, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Ap-apoLp-III was close to that of Bombycoidea. qPCR analysis revealed that Ap-ApoLp-III expressed during the four developmental stages and in integument, fat body, and ovaries. After six types of microorganism infections, expression levels of the Ap-ApoLp-III gene were upregulated significantly at different time points compared with control. RNA interference (RNAi) of Ap-ApoLp-III showed that the expression of Ap-ApoLp-III was significantly downregulated using qPCR after injection of E. coli. We infer that the Ap-ApoLp-III gene acts in the innate immunity of A. pernyi.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are crucial for insects to detect food, mates, predators, or other purposes. They are mostly located on antennae and other olfactory sensilla. In this study, we identified an OBP from the venom of Pteromalus puparum, designated as PpOBP. The cDNA of PpOBP is 517 bp in length, encoding 132 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PpOBP was clustered with OBP68 and OBP67 of Nasonia vitripennis. PpOBP was highly expressed in the venom apparatus at the transcriptional and translational levels. PpOBP was located in all parts of venom apparatus including venom gland, venom reservoir, and Dufour's gland. During 0–6 days post adult eclosion, the PpOBP mRNA level peaked at 2 days in the venom apparatus, whereas the protein remained at a high level. In the venom apparatus, the PpOBP mRNA was significantly upregulated following feeding with honey and parasitization. We propose that PpOBP is involved in parasitoid-host interactions.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Insecticide synergists biochemically inhibit insect metabolic enzyme activity and are used both to increase the effectiveness of insecticides and as a diagnostic tool for resistance mechanisms. Considerable attention has been focused on identifying new synergists from phytochemicals with recognized biological activities, specifically enzyme inhibition. Jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.), black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP.), balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.), and tamarack larch (Larix laricina (Du Roi) Koch) have been used by native Canadians as traditional medicine, specifically for the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties based on enzyme inhibitory activity. To identify the potential allelochemicals with synergistic activity, ethanol crude extracts and methanol/water fractions were separated by Sephadex LH-20 chromatographic column and tested for in vitro glutathione S-transferase (GST) inhibition activity using insecticide-resistant Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) midgut and fat-body homogenate. The fractions showing similar activity were combined and analyzed by ultra pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A lignan, (+)-lariciresinol 9′-p-coumarate, was identified from P. mariana cone extracts, and L. laricina and A. balsamea bark extracts. A flavonoid, taxifolin, was identified from P. mariana and P. banksiana cone extracts and L. laricina bark extracts. Both compounds inhibit GST activity with taxifolin showing greater activity compared to (+)-lariciresinol 9′-p-coumarate and the standard GST inhibitor, diethyl maleate. The results suggested that these compounds can be considered as potential new insecticide synergists.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The Chinese white wax scale insect (Ericerus pela) is sexually dimorphic with holometabolous males and hemimetabolous females. Holometabolous insects were assumed to originate from hemimetabolous ancestors. Therefore, the male pupal stage is a major innovation compared with hemimetabolous female insects. Here, the protein profiles of the male pupae were obtained by high-throughput proteomics and analyzed using bioinformatics methods. A total of 1,437 peptides were identified and assigned to 677 protein groups. Most of the proteins had molecular weights below 40 kDa and isoelectric points from 4 to 7. Gene Ontology terms were assigned to 331 proteins, including metabolic process, developmental process, and cellular process. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes annotations identified 142 pathways and most proteins were assigned to metabolism events. Pathways involved in cell growth and death, signal transduction, folding, and sorting and degradation were also identified. Six proteins that had undergone positive selection were classified into four groups, protein biosynthesis, protein degeneration, signal transduction, and detoxification. Many of the high-abundance proteins were enzymes involved in carbohydrate, lipid, and amino acid metabolism; signal transduction; degradation; and immunization, which indicated that metabolism, disruption, and development occurred intensely at the pupal stage. These processes are closely related to the physiological status of pupae. The results also suggested that these related proteins may be fundamental factors in the formation of pupae. This study describes pupal characterization at the molecular level and provides a basis for further physiological studies.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The dark black chafer, Holotrichia parallela, is an economically important pest in China and worldwide. Traps based on chemical communication are being developed as an alternative control measure to pesticides for this pest, and studies to reveal chemical communication mechanisms in this pest are highly desirable. To systematically analyze genes potentially involved in chemical communication in this pest, we generated a comprehensive transcriptome with combined samples derived from multiple tissues and developmental stages. A total of 43,967 nonredundant sequences (unigenes) with average length of 806 bp were obtained. These unigenes were annotated into different pathways using gene ontology analysis and cluster analysis of orthologous groups of proteins, and kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes. In total, 25 transcripts encoding odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and 16 transcripts encoding chemosensory proteins (CSPs) were identified based on homology searches. Tissue-specific expression profile indicates that OBP17 and CSP7 are likely responsible for male sex pheromone recognition, whereas OBP1–4, OBP9, OBP13–14, OBP17–18, OBP20, OBP22, OBP25, CSP1–7, CSP11, and CSP12–15 are likely responsible for chemical communication between the beetle and environments. Our data shall provide a foundation for further research on the molecular aspects of chemical communication of this insect, and for comparative genomic studies with other species.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) specifically bind to peptidoglycans, and play crucial roles as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in mediating innate immune responses. In this study, we identified and characterized a PGRP (HaPGRP-D) from the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Sequence analysis indicated that HaPGRP-D is an amidase-type PGRP. Expression of HaPGRP-D was upregulated in the hemocytes of H. armigera larvae after injecting Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, or chromatography beads. To test the biological activity of HaPGRP-D, purified recombinant protein was prepared. Subsequent analysis showed that rHaPGRP-D (i) could bind and agglutinate Gram-negative E. coli and Gram-positive S. aureus in a zinc-dependent manner, (ii) functioned as an amidase to degrade peptidoglycans in the presence of Zn2+, (iii) strongly inhibited the growth of E. coli and S. aureus in the presence of Zn2+, (iv) could bind to the surface of hemocytes, (v) increased the phagocytosis of E. coli cells by hemocytes in vitro, and (vi) promoted hemocyte encapsulation on chromatography beads in vitro. These results suggest that HaPGRP-D plays important roles as PRR, amidase, and opsonin in H. armigera humoral and cellular immune responses.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 08/2014; 86(4).
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    ABSTRACT: RNA interference (RNAi) signal can spread from the point where the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) was initially applied to other cells or tissues. SID-related genes in Caenorhabditis elegans help in the spreading of this signal. However, the mechanisms of systemic RNAi are still not unveiled in insects. In this study, we cloned a full-length cDNA of sid-1-like gene, Pxylsid-1, from Plutella xylostella that contains 1,047 bp opening reading frame encoding a putative protein of 348 amino acids. This transcript is very much similar to the sil-1 in Bombyx mori (68.8%). The higher expression levels of Pxylsid-1 were found at the adult and fourth-instar stages compared to the second-instar stage with 21.48- and 10.36-fold increase, respectively. Its expression levels in different tissues were confirmed with the highest expression in the hemolymph, which showed 21.09-fold increase than the midgut; however it was lower in other tissues. The result of RNAi by feeding bacterially expressed dsRNA targeting Pxylace-1, which showed that the mRNA level of Pxylace-1 decreased by 34.52 and 64.04% after 36- and 72-h treatment, respectively. However, the mRNA level of Pxylsid-1 was not significantly induced when the Pxylace-1 was downregulated. Furthermore, we found that downregulation of Pxylsid-1 did not affect the RNAi effect of Pxylace-1. Hence, the Pxylsid-1 may not be involved in absorption of dsRNA from the midgut fluid. A further study is needed to uncover the function of Pxylsid-1.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 08/2014;