Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology (Arch Insect Biochem Physiol )

Publisher: Entomological Society of America, John Wiley & Sons

Description

Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology is an international journal that publishes articles in English that are of interest to insect biochemists and physiologists. Generally these articles will be in or related to one of the following subject areas: Endocrinology Development Neurobiology Behavior Pharmacology Nutrition Carbohydrates Lipids Enzymes Proteins Peptides Nucleic Acids Molecular Biology Toxicology. ARCHIVES will publish only original articles. Articles that are confirmatory in nature or deal with analytical methods previously described will not be accepted.

  • Impact factor
    1.52
  • 5-year impact
    1.38
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.13
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.37
  • Website
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology website
  • Other titles
    Archives of insect biochemistry and physiology., Supplement., Archives of insect biochemistry and physiology (Online), Archives of insect biochemistry and physiology, Insect biochemistry and physiology
  • ISSN
    1520-6327
  • OCLC
    43007046
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

John Wiley & Sons

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • On personal web site or secure external website at authors institution
    • Not allowed on institutional repository
    • JASIST authors may deposit in an institutional repository
    • Non-commercial
    • Pre-print must be accompanied with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'John Wiley and Sons' is an imprint of 'Wiley-Blackwell'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The polyphagous cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) and the oligophagous oriental tobacco budworm Helicoverpa assulta (Guenée) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) display contrasting heritable feeding preferences for cotton and pepper leaves. In this study, electrophysiological response patterns to cotton and pepper leaf saps in gustatory sensilla styloconica on the maxillae of these two species, their reciprocal F1 hybrids, and backcrossed lines were investigated using the tip recording technique. The identity of the neurons responding to the two leaf saps has been established using action potential waveform analysis. The two plant leaf saps elicited neural activity in at least six of the eight taste neurons innervating the lateral and medial sensilla styloconica of the parental species and crosses. Discriminant analysis of this multineural input predicted that correct classification occurred in 87 - 92% of the cases. Differences in taste neuron responses between insect lines to the two plant saps were consistent with differences in feeding preference behaviors. Comparisons of taste neuron response patterns of parental species, F1 hybrids and backcrosses indicate that autosomal loci contributed to the difference in gustatory response patterns between the two Helicoverpa species with the H. armigera derived alleles being partly dominant to those carried by H. assulta. These findings contribute to the understanding of gustatory codes for preference and provide insight into taste evolution of lepidopteran insects.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Trehalases (Tres) have been demonstrated to be the key enzymes that are involved in various trehalose-associated physiological processes in insects. However, little attention has been devoted to the Tres in the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. In this study, a soluble Tre (BtTre-1) and a membrane-bound Tre (BtTre-2) were cloned in the invasive cryptic species Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) of the whitefly B. tabaci complex. Alignment of deduced amino acids sequences of both BtTres revealed that they share common consensus regions and residues with Tres of other insect species. Levels of BtTres expression in various stages and tissues of the whitefly suggested that BtTre-2 may play a key role in trehalose catabolism during development of the whitefly, especially for oocyte development, while BtTre-1 may prevent trehalose in salivary gland from leaking and entering into plants along with saliva. Potential roles of trehalose catabolism in response to direct and/or plant-mediated indirect effects of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl China Virus (TYLCCNV) were also detected. Whiteflies feeding on virus-infected tobacco plants showed higher BtTres expressions and accordingly higher BtTres activity but lower trehalose content than those feeding on uninfected plants. The enhanced trehalose catabolism may be beneficial to oocyte development in ovary and attenuate plant defensive responses induced by trehalose in saliva. Viruliferous and nonviruliferous whiteflies feeding on cotton, a nonhost plant for TYLCCNV, differed significantly only in trehalose content. The higher trehalose content in viruliferous whiteflies may be conducive to resisting the stress inflicted by TYLCCNV.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Natural bioactive preparations that will boost apian resistance, aid body detoxification, or fight crucial bee diseases are in demand. Therefore, we examined the influence of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, 2,3-dimethoxy, 5-methyl, 6-decaprenyl benzoquinone) treatment on honeybee lifespan, Nosema resistance, the activity/concentration of antioxidants, proteases and protease inhibitors, and biomarkers. CoQ10 slows age-related metabolic processes. Workers that consumed CoQ10 lived longer than untreated controls and were less infested with Nosema spp. Relative to controls, the CoQ10-treated workers had higher protein concentrations that increased with age but then they decreased in older bees. CoQ10 treatments increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, GPx, catalase, glutathione S-transferase), protease inhibitors, biomarkers (aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase), the total antioxidant potential level, and concentrations of uric acid and creatinine. The activities of acidic, neutral, and alkaline proteases, and concentrations of albumin and urea were lower in the bees that were administered CoQ10. CoQ10 could be taken into consideration as a natural diet supplement in early spring before pollen sources become available in the temperate Central European climate. A response to CoQ10 administration that is similar to mammals supports our view that Apis mellifera is a model organism for biochemical gerontology.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Insect immunity is innate and highly efficient to defend against various pathogens. However, uncontrolled excessive immune responses would be highly detrimental and energy-consuming processes. An insect cytokine, plasmatocyte-spreading peptide (SePSP), induces hemocyte-spreading behavior as well as activates phenoloxidase (PO) in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua. A hemocyte transcriptome of S. exigua contains a partial sequence of a putative PSP-binding protein (SePSP-BP1). SePSP-BP1 was expressed in most larval stages except in the last instar. However, a bacterial challenge induced SePSP-BP1 expression in the last instar especially in hemocytes and fat body. Injecting a double-stranded RNA specific to SePSP-BP1 (dsPSP-BP1) suppressed the induction of SePSP-BP1 expression in response to bacterial challenge. The larvae treated with dsPSP-BP1 suffered high mortality to infection of nonpathogenic bacteria due to uncontrolled high PO activity. SePSP significantly induced PO activity. The eicosanoid synthesis inhibitor, dexamethasone (DEX), inhibited SePSP-mediated PO activation. However, treatment with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) induced a transient increase of PO activity under DEX treatment. Treatment of dsPSP decreased the duration of PO activation induced by PGE2 , while treatment of dsPSP-BP1 increased the induced period. These results suggest that prostaglandin mediates PSP signals in both upregulation of PO activity and its subsequent downregulation via SePSP-BP1.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The Middle East-Minor 1 cryptic species (MEAM1), Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is a globally invasive pest. It spreads widely due to its high fecundity and mutualistic interactions with the virus they vector. Feeding on virus (tomato yellow leaf curl China virus, TYLCCNV)-infected host plants improves their fecundity, however, the key factor regulating the signaling transduction in reproduction of whitefly remains to be identified. Here, we cloned a full length cDNA encoding an insulin-like peptide in MEAM1 (BtILP1) and investigated its expression profile, functions, and the expression induced by feeding on virus-infected tobacco plants. The full length cDNA of BtILP1 was 590 bps and encoded an open reading frame containing 149 amino acid residues. Multiple sequences alignment results showed BtILP1 contained the structural features typical of the insulin family. Expression dynamics associated with development showed the expression level of BtILP1 peaked at 5 days posteclosion (PE). During 1 to 3 days PE, BtILP1 was expressed highly in the head and abdomen of female adults and highly in the head during 5 to 7 days PE. Knockdown of the BtILP1 expression also impaired vitellogenin gene expression at both transcript and protein levels. Downregulating BtILP1 expression decreased fecundity of female adults and hatching rate of eggs. Feeding on virus-infected tobacco increased BtILP1 expression in MEAM1 female adults. We infer feeding on begomovirus-infected tobacco enhances the reproduction of MEAM1 by inducing BtILP1 expression. Our results give a new sight into the mutualistic interactions between virus and its insect vector.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: As the main group of detoxification enzymes, cytochrome P450 monoxygenases (P450s) catalyse an extremely diverse range of reactions that play an important role in the detoxification of foreign compounds. Transcription profiling of 12 Lymantria dispar P450 genes from the CYP6 subfamily believed to be involved in insecticide metabolism was performed in this study. Life-stage transcription profiling of CYP6 genes revealed significant variations between eggs, larvae, pupae, and adult males and females. Exposure of larvae to sublethal doses of deltamethrin, omethoate, and carbaryl enhanced the transcription of most of the CYP6 P450 genes, with induction peaking between 24 and 72 h after exposure. Transcription profiles were dependent on the levels of insecticide exposure and the various developmental stages.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The PAR-domain protein 1 (PDP1) is essential for locomotor activity of insects. However, its functions in insect growth and development have not been studied extensively, which prompted our hypothesis that PDP1 acts in energy metabolism. Here we report identification of TcPDP1 in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and its functional analysis by RNAi. Treating larvae with dsTcPDP1 induced pupae developmental arrestment, accompanied by accelerated fat body degradation. dsTcPDP1 treatments in adults resulted in reduced female fecundity. Disruption of TcPDP1 expression affected the transcription of genes involved in insulin signaling transduction and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. These results support our hypothesis that TcPDP1 acts in energy metabolism in T. castaneum.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Forkhead (Fox) transcription factors display functional diversity and are involved in various metabolic and developmental processes. The Spodoptera exigua Fox (SeFox) encodes a protein of 353 amino acids with a theoretical molecular mass of approximately 38.99 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.86. qPCR results revealed that SeFox was expressed mainly in the brain, fat body, epidermis, midgut, Malpighian tubules, and testis. SeFox was expressed, with some changes, throughout development in the fat body and whole body. Injection of dsSeFox (SeFox dsRNA) into larvae resulted in incidences of albino plus molting deformity (4.8%), molting deformity (26.2%), and albino phenotypes (69.1%). dsSeFox injection resulted in approximately 50% knockdown of transcript levels at 36 h. Compared with control groups, hexokinase (HK) expression was reduced to approximately 40% at 48 h postinjection. Chitin synthase A (CHSA) expression was reduced to two-thirds at 24 h, but increased at 72 h. Compared with untreated control and green fluorescent protein-treated groups, Chitin synthase B (CHSB) expression decreased to 33% following dsSeFox injection by 36 h. We infer from our results that forkhead transcription factors act in chitin synthesis in S. exigua.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) are olfactory-specific, two-transmembrane proteins. Previous publications reported that SNMP1 is expressed on the dendrite membrane of pheromone-sensitive neurons in Heliothis virescens and is an essential cofactor for pheromone detection in Drosophila. In this study, we cloned two SNMP genes (GenBank accession nos. JX469106 and JX469107) from the antenna of the beet armyworm moth Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Hübner). These SNMP genes are classified into two highly conserved subclades, indicating their importance in physiological activity of lepidopteran insects. SexiSNMP1 is antenna-specific in male and female adults, while SexiSNMP2 is antenna-abundant but also expressed in other chemosensory tissues, particularly proboscises and maxillary palps of adults both sexes. In situ hybridization revealed that both SNMPs are broadly expressed in long and short trichoid and basiconic sensilla. We infer that SNMP1 and SNMP2 act in the detection of the sex pheromone and general odorants.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies have identified paracrine and endocrine cells in the midgut of larval Drosophila melanogaster as well as midgut and hindgut receptors for multiple neuropeptides implicated in the control of fluid and ion balance. Although the effects of diuretic factors on fluid secretion by isolated Malpighian tubules of D. melanogaster have been examined extensively, relatively little is known about the effects of such factors on gut peristalsis or ion transport across the gut. We have measured the effects of diuretic hormone 31 (DH31), drosokinin and allatostatin A (AST-A) on both K(+) transport and muscle contraction frequency in the isolated gut of larval D. melanogaster. K(+) absorption across the gut was measured using K(+) -selective microelectrodes and the scanning ion-selective electrode technique. Allatostatin A (AST-A; 1 μM) increased K(+) absorption across the anterior midgut but reduced K(+) absorption across the copper cells and large flat cells of the middle midgut. AST-A strongly inhibited gut contractions in the anterior midgut but had no effect on contractions of the pyloric sphincter induced by proctolin. DH31 (1 μM) increased the contraction frequency in the anterior midgut, but had no effect on K(+) flux across the anterior, middle, or posterior midgut or across the ileum. Drosokinin (1 μM) did not affect either contraction frequency or K(+) flux across any of the gut regions examined. Possible functions of AST-A, DH31, and drosokinin in regulating midgut physiology are discussed.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Chitin synthase (CHS) is the key regulatory enzyme in chitin synthesis and excretion in insects, and a specific target of insecticides. We cloned a CHS B gene of Bombyx mori (BmChsB) and showed it to be midgut specific, highly expressed during the feeding process in the larva. Knockdown of BmChsB expression in the third-instar larvae increased the number of nonmolting and abnormally molting larvae. Exposure to nikkomycin Z, a CHS inhibitor, reduced the amount of chitin in the peritrophic membrane of molted larvae, whereas abnormally elevated BmChsB mRNA levels were readily detected from the end of molting and in the newly molted larvae. Exogenous 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and methoprene, a juvenile hormone analogue, significantly upregulated the expression of BmChsB when the levels of endogenous molting hormone (MH) were low and the levels of endogenous juvenile hormone (JH) were high immediately after molting. When levels of endogenous MH were high and those of endogenous JH were low during the molting stage, exogenous 20E did not upregulate BmChsB expression and exogenous methoprene upregulated it negligibly. When the endogenous hormone levels were low during the mulberry-leaf intake process, BmChsB expression was upregulated by exogenous methoprene. We conclude that the expression of BmChsB is regulated by insect hormones, and directly affects the chitin-synthesis-dependent form of the peritrophic membrane and protects the food intake and molting process of silkworm larvae.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 01/2014; 85(1):36-47.
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    ABSTRACT: When a female varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), invades a honey bee brood cell, the physiology rapidly changes from feeding phoretic to reproductive. Changes in foraging and malvolio transcript levels in the brain have been associated with modulated intra-specific food searching behaviors in insects and other invertebrates. Transcription profiles for both genes were examined during and immediately following brood cell invasion to assess their role as potential control elements. Vdfor and Vdmvl transcripts were found in all organs of varroa mites with the highest Vdfor transcript levels in ovary-lyrate organs and the highest Vdmvl in Malpighian tubules. Changes in transcript levels of Vdfor and Vdmvl in synganglia were not associated with the cell invasion process, remaining comparable between early reproductive mites (collected from the pre-capping brood cells) and phoretic mites. However, Vdfor and Vdmvl transcript levels were lowered by 37 and 53%, respectively, in synganglia from reproductive mites compared to early reproductive mites, but not significantly different to levels in synganglia from phoretic mites. On the other hand, in whole body preparations the Vdfor and Vdmvl had significantly higher levels of transcript in reproductive mites compared to phoretic and early reproductive, mainly due to the presence of both transcripts accumulating in the eggs carried by the ovipositing mite. Varroa mites are a critical component for honey bee population decline and finding varroa mite genes associated with brood cell invasion, reproduction, ion balance and other physiological processes will facilitate development of novel control avenues for this honey bee parasite.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: The sexual difference in gene expression in fat body between 8- and 10-day-old male and female Bactrocera dorsalis was examined using suppression subtractive hybridization. A total of 952 clones were sequenced and searched using BLAST from the subtracted cDNA library. About 22% of these clones showed homology with detoxification enzymes including cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) and glutathione S-transferase. NADH dehydrogenases, distributed to energy metabolism, constituted about 9% of these clones. About 10% of these clones were cecropin, an antimicrobial peptide. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis showed that four transcripts were expressed at a higher level in fat body of males, compared to females. Bactrocera dorsalis cyp6g2 (Bdcyp6g2) was cloned (accession number KF469179) and the temporal profile of transcriptional expression showed that Bdcyp6g2 mRNA increased with age in males from day 3 after eclosion, but only on days 0-3 in females. Compared to females, the susceptibility of 9-day-old males to three insecticides was significantly less. These results suggested the genes expressed at a higher level in male act in its survival.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Gene fragments encoding the large subunit (LS) of Rubisco (RBCL) were cloned from various species of host plants of phytophagous Lepidoptera and expressed as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Recombinant RBCLs were compared among each other along with casein and native Rubisco as proteinaceous substrates for measuring total midgut protease activities of fourth instar larvae of Helicoverpa armigera feeding on casein, Pieris brassicae feeding on cauliflower, and Antheraea assamensis feeding on Litsea monopetala and Persea bombycina. Cognate rRBCL (from the pertinent host plant species) substrates performed similar to noncognate rRBCL reflecting the conserved nature of encoding genes and the versatile use of these recombinant proteins. Casein and recombinant RBCL generally outperformed native Rubisco as substrates, except where inclusion of a reducing agent in the enzyme assay likely unfolded the plant proteins. Levels of total midgut protease activities detected in A. assamensis larvae feeding on two primary host species were similar, suggesting that the suite(s) of digestive enzymes in these insects could hydrolyze a plant protein efficiently. Protease activities detected in the presence of protease inhibitors and the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) suggested that recombinant RBCL was a suitable protein substrate for studying insect proteases using in vitro enzyme assays and substrate zymography.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, larvae of silkworm Bombyx mori were subjected to low temperature, hypoxia, and viral infection to evaluate stressor-mediated oxidative stress (OS) and the induction of antioxidant enzymes (AOEs). Exposure to cold, hypoxia, and nuclear polyhedral virus for 24 h resulted in a significant increase in hydrogen peroxide generation with concomitant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonyl levels in midgut and hemocytes. AOEs such as superoxide dismutase and catalase also increased significantly in both the tissues and the increased AOEs reverted to control values during recovery. Ontogenic stages of the larvae showed a diminishing ability of the tissues to overcome OS induced by the stressors. A significant increase in AOE activity during short stress period indicated a possible transitory defense mechanism to avoid OS-induced cell damage.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 11/2013;

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