Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society (J Inform Comm Ethics Soc )

Publisher: Emerald

Description

The Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the impacts of new media, information and communication technologies on society, organizations, the environment and individuals.

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  • 5-year impact
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  • Cited half-life
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  • Website
    Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society website
  • Other titles
    Journal of information, communication and ethics in society, Information, communication & ethics in society, ICES
  • ISSN
    1477-996X
  • OCLC
    52925194
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Emerald

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Voluntary deposit by author of author's pre-print or author's post-print allowed on author's personal website or Institutional repository, where there is no mandate to deposit
    • If mandated by a funding agency, the author's post-print may be deposited in any open access repository after a 24 months embargo period
    • Author's pre-print and Author's post-print not allowed on subject-based repository
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set statement
    • Non-commercial
    • Publisher last contacted on 02/04/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to examine institutional influences on the customer service (CS) and complaints handling (CH) practices of the Australian Internet industry. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The study adopted a qualitative research methodology using semi-structured interview as a research method. The study was informed by constructivist/interpretive research paradigm approaches to knowledge. Eleven senior executives from key Internet industry stakeholder organizations were interviewed. Findings ‐ Using the neo-institutional theory lens, this study found that the institutional forces (regulatory, customer and competition pressures) played a pivotal role in bringing all Internet industry stakeholders together to address CS/CH shortcomings in the old Telecommunications Consumer Protection (TCP) Code 2007. This led to significant changes to the CS/CH practices detailed in the revised TCP Code 2012. The study findings revealed that frequent and fateful collaborations between central institutional actors have led to the emergence of organizational fields. The actors identified in the emerging organizational fields actively influence the CS/CH practices and the subsequent implementation of the practices in vLISPs. Research limitations/implications ‐ The study focused on the functional aspects of service quality (SQ). Technical aspects of SQ is equally important, and future research needs to consider both aspects of SQ when assessing overall performance of vLISPs. Practical implications ‐ The study findings encourage vLISP managers to continue collaboration with external stakeholders and develop customer-friendly practices that deliver desirable CS/CH outcomes. Social implications ‐ The study findings revealed that when all vLISP industry stakeholders collaborate with each other on a focal issue, there is noticeable progress towards development of CS practices that will contribute to a better CS experience. Originality/value ‐ An evidence-based approach was used towards understanding and explaining how and why institutional actors of technology-based service organizations act together. A significant contribution arising from this study is the identification and discussion of emerging organizational fields comprising the central actors in the Internet industry. These emerging organizational fields have the potential to develop into mature organizational fields and inform future CS/CH practices and consumer protection policies in the Australian Internet industry.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 08/2014; 12(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this study is to explain cross-cultural differences in online self-disclosure (SD) between Indonesians, who live in a highly collectivist culture, and Poles ‐ a hierarchical individualist culture. Various psychological factors have been taken into consideration, such as the need for popularity (NfP), the need to belong (NtB) and self-esteem (SE). Design/methodology/approach ‐ This study was designed as a quantitative study. First, a one-way ANOVA was performed to compare online SD and specific behaviours online between Indonesians and Poles. Second, correlational analysis between online SD and other psychological factors (NfP, NtB, SE) was conducted. Findings ‐ Indonesians were more likely than Poles to disclose information on Facebook. On the other hand, Poles showed a tendency to disclose more positive content than Indonesians. It was also found that SE was significantly correlated with positive content of online SD for both countries. Furthermore, online SD on Facebook is more closely associated with NfP than NtB. Research limitations/implications ‐ This study possesses several limitations in regard to the lack of generalization; this is due to the choice in scales and the sampling procedure. Thereby, further studies must take into consideration the proportion of genders, the differences in the construction of the "self" between individualist and collectivist cultures and the interpretation of culture orientation based on the primary data. Furthermore, several results related to the online SD would need to be verified by further studies to get a holistic explanation. Originality/value ‐ The current research is for all means and purposes original, as it investigates the differences of online behaviours between cultures ‐ Polish and Indonesian ‐ basing on the premise that there are crucial differences between collectivist and individualist cultures. No prior articles attempted the comparison between those nationalities in online behaviour.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 08/2014; 12(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ This study aims to investigate the perceptions, acceptance, usage and access to social media by students and academics in higher education in informatics programs in Malaysia. A conceptual model based on Connectivism and communities of practice (CoPs) learning theory was developed and were used as a basis of mapping the research questions to the design frameworks and the research outcomes. A significant outcome of this study will be the development of a design framework for implementing social media as supporting tools for student engagement and teaching and learning of informatics programs in higher education institutions (HEIs) in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach ‐ A mixed-method research methodology with a significant survey research component was employed for this research. This methodology focused on collecting and analyzing quantitative and qualitative data to better understand the research problems. For this study, a mixed-method sequential transformative research strategy based on a QUAN-Qual model was used in the data collection process. Mixed-method research methodology is considered to be most appropriate for this study, as it allows the researcher to gather multiple forms of data from diverse audiences such as educators, administrators and students. Findings ‐ The findings show the close matched of the ownership, amount of hours spent online, types of social media technologies (SMTs) used and pattern of usage between informatics and non-informatics students. It also shows that many students and instructors have started to explore and accept the use of SMTs as a tool for engaging with their institution and their peers as well as for teaching and learning purposes. Innovative institutions need to understand the critical success factors and the barriers that restrict the implementation of SMTs within the HEI to take advantage of the opportunities offered by SMTs in higher education. Research limitations/implications ‐ The surveys and interview participant, in part, are self-selecting, so the data collected cannot be claimed to be representative of the population. However, because of the relatively large number of participants, it can be considered that the findings are indicative. Other limitation includes the depth of data that can be collected using this methodology. Practical implications ‐ There is wide range of social media usage in educational settings now being reported, but many issues are still unexamined. Limited studies have been focusing on the educators' readiness, acceptance or refusal in integrating social media into their courses, the perceived effectiveness of the tools and student outcomes for their learning. The central outcome of this research will be the development of a design framework that will be used as a guide for Malaysian HEIs and informatics academics to engage students using SMTs in creating effective learning communities for informatics programs. Social implications ‐ The framework will have implication for the social interaction and engagement of students with their institution. Originality/value ‐ Very little work has been reported on student and academic engagement, their perspectives and perceived effectiveness of social media usage in higher education, especially in the Malaysia context. Most of the research focused only on the quantitative research with students from universities in the USA and Australia, with an emphasis mainly on student's perception and acceptance. There are calls for more research to examine how social media is perceived and accepted by students and academics for teaching and learning, especially in Malaysia.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 08/2014; 12(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The aim of this study is to study the implementation of G2B initiatives for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Hong Kong, focusing on the underlying importance, benefits and challenges. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The context of this study was initially established based on comparisons with B2B initiatives. However, it is also learned from the literature that the transformational aspect of e-Government development has not been materialized, whereas the extended web assessment method (EWAM), the three-ring model and DeLone and McLean's IS success model were therefore identified to derive and build the theoretical G2B success model, thereby developing the online survey instrument of this study. Specifically, a positivist paradigm was adopted to investigate the impact of each G2B success factor on the overall satisfaction with using the G2B systems under examination from the perspective of SMEs, rather than simply placing emphasis on the number of electronic services provided and the investments spent. Findings ‐ The research findings were compiled based on both the multiple regression analysis and EWAM analysis results, thus making the necessary improvements in the appropriate service aspects of the G2B systems concerned. Originality/value ‐ The main study concluded that prevalent G2B initiatives in Hong Kong have been largely connected to pursuing conservative paradigms in public service provision. The new e-Government strategic agenda is therefore laid out for increasing the overall transparency of new public management based on the provision of resilient-based public services, thereby advancing the democratic empowerment of all the G2B stakeholders involved and also maximizing the multifold effects of value creations.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 08/2014; 12(3).
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    ABSTRACT: The increase usage and employment of Social Media Technologies (SMTs) in personal, business and education activities is credited to the advancement of Internet broadband services, mobile devices, smart phones and web-based technologies. Informatics programs are technological-oriented in nature, hence students and academics themselves would arguably be quite adept at using SMTs. Students undertaking Informatics programs are trained to thrive in challenging, advanced technical environments as manifestations of the fast-paced world of Information Technology. Students must be able to think logically and learn “how to learn” as “knowledge upon demand” is one of the expected capabilities of Informatics graduates. This rapid change in knowledge and skill sets requires learners to not only be lifelong learners, but to be constantly connected to the field of computing science. SMTs may be the conduit that supports these needs. Despite being an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) hub and having advanced ICT Infrastructure nationally, the use of social media beyond young people in Malaysia for education purposes is still relatively new and little is known about the user experience, intentions, perceptions and acceptance of these technologies by students. This paper reports on a work-in-progress that investigates the perceptions, acceptance, usage and access to social media by undergraduate Informatics students in higher education institutions in Malaysia. Preliminary findings from 331 responses collected from an online questionnaires administered to students, academics and administrators from Informatics and Non-Informatics programs show that whilst students reported SMTs use mainly for personal social activities, the data from online questionnaires show that many students and instructors have started to explore and accept the use of SMTs as a tool for engaging with their Institution and their peers as well as for teaching and learning purposes. The paper also presents a conceptual model based on Connectivism and Communities of Practice (CoP) that has been developed to inform the study in terms of the role SMTs can play in building virtual learning communities. The intended outcome from this study is the development of a design framework for implementing SMTs as supporting tools for student engagement and to inform future practice.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 08/2014; 12(3):177-194.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper explores similarities and differences between robots, invasive biological species, and genetically modified organisms. These comparisons are designed to better understand the potential effects of robots on human society.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Ubiquitous computing and "big data" have been widely recognized as requiring new concepts of privacy and new mechanisms to protect it. While improved concepts of privacy have been suggested, the paper aims to argue that people acting in full conformity to those privacy norms still can infringe the privacy of others in the context of ubiquitous computing and "big data". Design/methodology/approach ‐ New threats to privacy are described. Helen Nissenbaum's concept of "privacy as contextual integrity" is reviewed concerning its capability to grasp these problems. The argument is based on the assumption that the technologies work, persons are fully informed and capable of deciding according to advanced privacy considerations. Findings ‐ Big data and ubiquitous computing enable privacy threats for persons whose data are only indirectly involved and even for persons about whom no data have been collected and processed. Those new problems are intrinsic to the functionality of these new technologies and need to be addressed on a social and political level. Furthermore, a concept of data minimization in terms of the quality of the data is proposed. Originality/value ‐ The use of personal data as a threat to the privacy of others is established. This new perspective is used to reassess and recontextualize Helen Nissenbaum's concept of privacy. Data minimization in terms of quality of data is proposed as a new concept.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 05/2014; 12(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to present a novel mnemonic, ACTIVE, inspired by Mason's 1985 PAPA mnemonic, which will help researchers and IT professionals develop an understanding of the major issues in information ethics. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Theoretical foundations are developed for each element of the mnemonic by reference to philosophical definitions of the terms used and to virtue ethics, particularly MacIntyrean virtue ethics. The paper starts with a critique of the elements of the PAPA mnemonic and then proceeds to develop an understanding of each of the elements of ACTIVE ethics, via a discussion of the underpinning virtue ethics. Findings ‐ This paper identifies six issues, described by the mnemonic, ACTIVE. ACTIVE stands for: autonomy, the ability of the individual to manage their own information and make choice; community, the ethical effect of an information systems on the community which it supports; transparency, the extent to which the derivation of content and process in an information system is made clear; identity, the social and ethical effect of an information system on the definition and maintenance of the distinctive characteristics of a person; value, the value or moral worth placed on information associated with an individual and hence on the relationship with the individual; and empathy, the ability of the information systems professional to emotionally connect with the user and the extent to which the information system distances or connects. Originality/value ‐ The paper applies virtue ethics to developing a tool to help information professionals reflect on their ethical practice in developing and supporting information systems.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 03/2014; 12(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The paper is a conceptual investigation of the metaphysics of personal identity and the ethics of biometric passports. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Philosophical argument, discussing both the metaphysical and the social ethics/computer ethics literature on personal identity and biometry. Findings ‐ The author argues for three central claims in this paper: passport are not simply representations of personal identity, they help constitute personal identity. Personal identity is not a metaphysical fact, but a set of practices, among them identity management practices (e.g. population registries) employed by governments. The use of biometry as part of these identity management practices is not an ethical problem as such, nor is it something fundamentally new and different compared to older ways of establishing personal identity. It is worrisome, however, since in the current political climate, it is systematically used to deny persons access to specific territories, rights, and benefits. Originality/value ‐ The paper ties together strands of philosophical inquiry that do not usually converse with one another, namely the metaphysics of personal identity, and the topic of identity in social philosophy and computer ethics.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 03/2014; 12(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Tabletop online role-playing games enable active learning appropriate for different ages and learner capabilities. They have also been implemented in computer and engineering ethics courses. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach ‐ This paper presents the experience of implementing role-playing in several courses embedded in Web 2.0 environment, with an intention to confront complex and sometimes mutually conflicting concepts, and integrate them into a whole. Findings ‐ Typical examples introducing two basic scenarios representing individual and collaborative learning scripts are presented together with the detailed analysis how the games were performed, the effort to participate in, and to maintain them. Particular attention is paid to student feedback. Originality/value ‐ The paper concludes with the basic findings of the effects of role-playing in current learning computer ethics and social responsibilities courses, and recommendations for future implementation of similar asynchronous learning online activities in order to increase their academic value and prepare students for their forthcoming professional integration.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 03/2014; 12(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The paper aims to represent a response to the invited paper by Ellen Christiansen: "From ethics of the eye to ethics of the hand in participatory design and development of digital technologies". Design/methodology/approach ‐ The response takes departure in Christiansen's view points regarding dialogue-oriented collaborative prototyping as a mean to address values in design. Findings ‐ The response points to the limitations of Christiansen's approach in claiming that dialogue cannot by itself ensure integration of ethics into the practice of design. Originality/value ‐ The response addresses methodological issues related to ethical design and stresses the importance of a pro-active design approach in order to implement values in design.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 03/2014; 12(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ This paper aims to focus on the modern development of bionics and linking new technologies with the human nervous system or other biological systems that cause changes of the human biological structure. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The paper is a discursive evaluation of technological progress and new systems where computers and machines integrate, making a single matrix entity ‐ the cyborg. Here fundamental questions arise, such as what it means to be human and what is (descriptive aspect) and what should be (normative aspect) a human being? Findings ‐ The paper argues for the value of twenty-first century human enhancement techniques and other emerging technologies that promised to "help" humans become "more than human", trying to create human beings with greatly enhanced abilities, to improve human mental and physical characteristics and capacities. Modern man is gradually disappearing as a natural being and increasingly turning into an artificial creature "cyborg" that leads into the question, what will ultimately remain human in a human body? Originality/value ‐ The paper contributes to the existing debates about further development of cyborgisation and examines boundaries that will strictly divide man from a cyborg in the near future. In order to protect man from the omnipotence of technology and its unethical application is necessary to establish cyborgoethics that would determine the implementation of an artificial boundary in the natural body.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 01/2014; 12(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Research described in this paper focuses on a need to consult inhabitants about a new technical solution introduced in a country-wide scale like it is in the case of a smart metering system ‐ finally, all energy consumers will become its users. Its social acceptance is required. So it is a good example of an ethical approach to introduce an innovative solution in the society. The conducted research was intended to help developing strategy to build appropriate relationships with energy consumers during the planned exchange of energy meters and to prepare energy consumers to make use of all functionality of the installed meters. The course of the conducted research and its results are presented. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The described forms of cooperation with people are direct interviews in focus groups and a questionnaire survey involving representative social sample (surveys have been conducted during direct meetings and via internet). They are described as a case study. An agenda of each interview and also a content of a questionnaire cover topics within the area of natural environment protection, a need to save energy, individual activities leading to energy saving, smart metering, its benefits and potential threats including risk of intrusion privacy. Selected results are included. Findings ‐ Consultations (with energy consumers) based on focus groups and questionnaire surveys have been well accepted by the participants. Respondents feel a need to express their opinions on a given subject. Citizens' attention concerns mostly the economic aspects of a new system. Energy consumers are able to formulate and declare strong and weak points of smart meters. Some threats concerning intrusion of privacy have been expressed by respondents and included in the paper. Practical implications ‐ General conclusion is the following ‐ each large system is not only a set of technical devices and software routines but it is also a system built by humans and for humans. Wide consultations on a smart metering bring benefits and help ensuring social acceptance. The raising social awareness of the need to save energy is one more benefit from the undertaken activities. An importance of consulting people about new solution involving all inhabitants is emphasized. Direct and structured interviews are the preferred form of social consultations. it is highlighted by some of the pollsters involved in the survey that respondents tell the truth rather in a direct conversation than in a remote mode via internet (involved pollsters have had an opportunity to check if respondents' statements are true). Originality/value ‐ The described research took place in November 2012. Earlier only technical experts and academia were involved in discussions concerning smart metering. Selected data are included to show results of the research. The presented approach may help interested parties to introduce new solution and to avoid social opposition, rejection of the idea and misunderstandings.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 01/2014; 12(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to introduce the term Slow Tech as a way of describing information and communication technology (ICT) that is good, clean and fair. These are technologies that are human centred, environmentally sustainable and socially desirable. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The paper's approach is based on a qualitative discourse that justifies the introduction of Slow Tech as a new design paradigm. Findings ‐ The limits of the human body, and the need to take into account human wellbeing, the limits of the planet and stakeholders' interests in decision making, all suggest the need for a new paradigm, Slow Tech, in the design of ICT and ICT systems. Three scenarios are described as case studies. Practical implications ‐ In order to prepare the next generation of researchers and computer professionals, many different actions need to be taken. Universities and colleges need to redesign education programmes for computer scientists and engineers by introducing subjects related to the social and ethical implications of computing (currently, only few countries, like the UK, have already done this), and computer professionals' associations need to introduce a code of ethics or ethical analysis into their members' career development. As a result, future computer professionals who are familiar with the Slow Tech approach will be able to collaborate much more easily across the kind of cross disciplinary teams suited to design human centred, sustainable and desirable technologies. Social implications ‐ Rather than simply focusing on the role of computer professionals, all members of society are called to play a new role in the design of future ICT scenarios. Starting a societal dialogue that involves computer professionals, users, researchers, designers, ICT industrialists, and policy makers is very much needed. Originality/value ‐ The value of this paper is in its call for reflection followed by action. Based on an holistic approach to the design of new ICT systems, the paper advocates a new starting point for systems design: it should be based on a long-term view of the desirability and social importance of technologies, their environmental impact and sustainability, and the fairness and equity of the conditions of workers involved in the computing manufacturing processes.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 01/2014; 12(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The aim of this paper is to answer the question: how can judgment about good and bad behavior of a device or service under development be included in the development process? Design/methodology/approach ‐ By distinguishing between detached good/bad judgment, called "ethics of the eye", and judgment about good and bad behavior embedded in doing and dialogue, called "ethics of the hand", two examples of designer judgment are examined, one embedded and one detached. The outcome is explained by means of an application of Ricoeur's hermeneutics, where he shows how narration comprises pre-figuration, con-figuration and re-figuration. An examination of collaborative prototyping in Krzysztof Wodiczko's work on building a vehicle together with homeless people in Manhattan, New York, is contrasted with an example of the detached evaluation of use in Joseph Weizenbaum's account for use of his computer therapy program Eliza. Findings ‐ The difference is identified as the difference between joint making and dialogue, resulting in re-configuration, and detached evaluation, which sticks with the pre-figuration. The paper concludes that for engineering and design at large "ethics of the hand", the collaborative doing and dialogue, where the engineering and the designerly way of understanding come together over a prototype, brings out a shared frame, which makes ethics an integrated part of the development process. Originality/value ‐ The paper discusses how judgment about good and bad behavior of a device or service under development can be included in the development process and shows that the answer is collaborative prototyping.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 01/2014; 12(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to present a descriptive literature review and a classification scheme for studies on sustainable development, e-learning and Web 3.0 that contribute toward sustainable e-learning. The aims are to discover and highlight some ideas on developing a sustainable learning in higher education in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The paper examines the elements of e-learning, technology, application, sustainable development and teaching and learning principles that contribute toward a sustainable e-learning through a descriptive literature review approach and a classification scheme. Findings ‐ The findings show that even though sustainable e-learning research is still limited, contributions to sustainable e-learning were recognized and some ideas and perspectives for the development of a sustainable e-learning framework were identified. Furthermore, this paper identified the gaps in the findings; therefore, this paper will try to minimize these gaps through the initial sustainable e-learning framework. Originality/value ‐ The paper is expected to provide further ideas of developing a sustainable e-learning framework, as well as the importance of a sustainable e-learning to provide quality learning through technology, application, sustainable development and teaching and learning principles perspectives.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 01/2014; 12(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to examine the ethical implications of Google's Knowledge Graph. The paper argues that in the advent and implementation of said Knowledge Graph, the role of Google in users' lives and the power held by Google as the key intermediary of information must be scrutinized. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Revisiting existing literature on Google and its impact on knowledge culture, the paper seeks to assess whether the implementation of The Knowledge Graph represents a significant shift in the nature (or use) of the service. Findings ‐ The paper concludes that the extension to Google Search, The Knowledge Graph, can serve to radicalize Google's position as a key intermediary of information in users' lives. Rather than simply serving as a gatekeeper supplying the user with an array of links matching a given query, Google now conveniently disseminates information on their own site, roughly rendering the remainder of the web superfluous. Considering both the commercial nature and the opacity of the service, Google as a de facto solo editor of information is worrying from both a democratic and ethical perspective. A culture of emphatic insistence on convenience and consumption is likely to contribute to the impediment of autonomous information retrieval and digital literacy. Research limitations/implications ‐ The paper must be considered a preliminary inquiry into Google's reliability as an editor of the body of knowledge. As of yet, no literature specifically has remarked on The Knowledge Graph. Originality/value ‐ This paper examines whether the newest extension of Google Search, The Knowledge Graph, poses any significant changes to the assessment of the service and its role in the culture. Fostering critical, digital literacy in search engine users is deemed of even more vital importance to society with the implementation of The Knowledge Graph. This paper, preliminary and far from exhaustive, seeks to initiate a discussion on the future responsibilities of Google, scholars and users in securing the ideal of critical digital literacy.
    Journal of Information Communication and Ethics in Society 11/2013; 11(4).