Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Maney Publishing

Journal description

Current impact factor: 0.22

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
ISSN 1474-9009

Publisher details

Maney Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo for STEM (science, technology, engineering and medicine) journals
    • 2 years embargo for HSS (humanities and social science) journals
  • Conditions
    • Authors' pre-print on author's personal website or institutional website, or institutional repository, or subject-based repository
    • Author's post-print on institutional repository, or subject-based repository
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with citation
    • On a non-profit server
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 06/2015; 124(2):69-72. DOI:10.1179/1743286315Y.0000000003
  • Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 05/2015; DOI:10.1179/1743286315Y.0000000008
  • Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 05/2015; 124(2):78-82. DOI:10.1179/1743286315Y.0000000005
  • Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 05/2015; 124(2):73-77. DOI:10.1179/1743286315Y.0000000004
  • Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 04/2015; 124(2):1743286315Y.000. DOI:10.1179/1743286315Y.0000000007
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    ABSTRACT: A refinement of the traditional Mine-to-Mill integration opportunity for copper block cave mines is introduced here as a Cave-to-Mill production management concept. This is essentially the integration of underground mine production scheduling and monitoring with surface mineral processing management based upon fragment size and geometallurgical ore characteristics. Cave-to-Mill defines ore block models with respect to both mine and mill performance. Linkages between key cave and mill parameters have been established so that coordinated efforts towards maximizing net present value (NPV) can be made. Discrete fracture network (DFN) based methods were found to hold significant value within the Cave-to-Mill approach. The variable and relatively uncontrollable nature of cave fragmentation is considered to be a key distinguishing feature of Cave-to-Mill when compared with typical Mine-to-Mill strategies established for open-pit mines. It is envisioned that Cave-to-Mill will be an important design and operational strategy for block cave mines.
    Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 03/2015; 124(1):47-55. DOI:10.1179/1743286315Y.0000000001
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pre-splitting is a controlled blasting technique with applications in open pit mines. The main objectives of pre-splitting in open pit mining are: preventing/controlling back-break; controlling excessive ground vibrations; and filtering the effects of explosive gases from production blasting. This technique is especially effective in back-break control through providing a separating surface between the main blasting pattern and open pit final walls. In this study, a large open pit mine was the case study for the goal of designing pre-splitting through implementation of direct and cost effective experiments. Three tests were designed and performed at the mine. Back-break was successfully controlled through proper design of pre-splitting based on the results of the experiments.
    Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 03/2015; 124(1):64-68. DOI:10.1179/1743286314Y.0000000077
  • Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 12/2014; 123(4):220-229. DOI:10.1179/1743286314Y.0000000070
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    ABSTRACT: Can large-screen visualisation and simulation technology be utilised to depict sustainable mining practices? The system described here provides an opportunity to experience a mine site and the surrounding area via visualisation and simulation. The system presents sustainable mining concepts that must be managed at a mine site surrounded by a national park. The system includes historic and current data and perspectives from mine site, environmental and local personnel. All information must be assessed against an original environmental impact statement and conclusions be drawn upon how the mine has developed. Knowledge gained is transferred to a new site, and issues must be resolved to the satisfaction of all stakeholders. The paper summarises the system and reports outcomes of a trial deployment. The results are encouraging, and the system may prove to be a useful tool for community engagement and mine planning on future projects.
    Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 12/2014; 23:199-206. DOI:10.1179/1743286314Y.0000000068
  • Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 12/2014; 123(4):193-198. DOI:10.1179/1743286314Y.0000000066
  • Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 12/2014; 123(4):230-239. DOI:10.1179/1743286314Y.0000000071
  • Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 09/2014; 123(3):120-127. DOI:10.1179/1743286313Y.0000000050
  • Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 09/2014; 123(3):140-148. DOI:10.1179/1743286313Y.0000000052
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    ABSTRACT: Post-blast nitrogen oxide fumes (NOx) from coal overburden blasting may occur in a variety of geological conditions with the use of bulk ammonium nitrate (AN) based explosive products. In Australia, government directives to stop blasting activities because of NOx fume incidences have led to costly delays in production, which has directly impacted on the ability of operations to meet production targets. Nitrogen oxide and nitrogen dioxide can cause serious health risks to persons exposed, with excessive levels of NO2 also affecting the viability of flora and root systems. A number of research projects in Australia have focussed on minimising the risk of NOx fumes by better understanding the behaviour of current explosive products. The main outcomes from these projects have been the development and implementation of guidelines or administrative controls to minimise the NOx fume risk and reduce the potential exposure to the hazard. This paper describes preliminary work to provide a step-change solution that has the potential to completely eliminate the NOx hazard. A novel formulation that substitutes the use of AN with oxygenated water (OW) as the main oxidising agent has been developed and recently patented as part of a PhD program at The University of Queensland. The detonation properties of mixtures made with OW and fuel were studied. Unconfined velocities of detonation (VODs) tests of OW sensitised mixtures were conducted. It was found that for reliable detonation to occur, a minimum level of sensitisation must be accomplished. Adequately sensitised mixtures, with a water content of 47% by weight, were able to detonate at velocities in the range of 2600-5000 m s−1, with a critical diameter of the order of 23 mm. The recorded detonation velocities were clearly dependent on the mixture density and charge diameter, similar to the non-ideal behaviour of AN-based commercial explosives.
    Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 08/2014; 124(1):1743286314Y.000. DOI:10.1179/1743286314Y.0000000074
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    ABSTRACT: Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) offers an inexpensive and rapid method for delineating the laterite profiles by acquiring fine-scale data from the ground. In a case study, a GPR survey was conducted at the Weipa bauxite mine in Australia, in which numerous pick points corresponding to the depth to the bauxite/ironstone boundary were acquired from the ground. These pick points were subsequently merged with the available exploration borehole data using four prediction algorithms, including standard linear regression (SLR), simple kriging with varying local means (SKLM), Bayesian integration (BAY), and ordinary co-located cokriging (OCCK). The required structural inputs for the aforementioned algorithms were derived from the modelled auto and cross-semi-variograms. The cross-validation results suggest that the SKLM approach yielded the most robust estimates. The comparison of these estimates with the actual mine floor also indicates that the inclusion of ancillary GPR data substantially improved the estimation quality.
    Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section A: Mining Technology 08/2014; 124(1):1743286314Y.000. DOI:10.1179/1743286314Y.0000000073