European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP)

Publisher: European Cancer Prevention Organisation, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

Description

  • Impact factor
    2.21
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    6.80
  • Immediacy index
    0.30
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.61
  • Other titles
    European journal of cancer prevention (Online), European journal of cancer prevention
  • ISSN
    1473-5709
  • OCLC
    362263375
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • Pre-print must be removed upon acceptance for publication
    • Post-print may be deposited in personal website, university's institutional repository or employers intranet
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must include statement that it is not the final published version
    • Published source must be acknowledged with full citation
    • Must link to publisher version
    • NIH, Wellcome Trust and HHMI authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf (see policy for details)
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 05/2014; 23(3):233.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Throughout centuries, many theories have been proposed to explain the origin of cancer. In this review, some of them are presented and briefly commented upon. The theories discussed are divided into epigenetic and genetic ones, with the latter further classified into gene-based and genome-based hypotheses. Multistage cancer development leading to the mutator, malignant cell phenotype is also described. Finally, the current hot topic of cancer stem cells is presented.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 03/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to describe awareness levels of colonoscopy as a screening procedure for colorectal cancer (CRC), to study its uptake and analyze possible associated factors in Spain. This was a cross-sectional study using data from the Oncobarómetro survey, carried out by face-to-face interviews with a representative national sample of the Spanish population aged 18 years and older. Awareness was assessed using the following questions: 'Do you know of any examination procedures or medical technique used to detect cancer?' and 'I'm going to list some screening procedures (including colonoscopy) to see if you know of them as a cancer screening test or whether this is the first time you have heard of them'. To evaluate colonoscopy uptake, participants were asked whether they had undergone a colonoscopy in the past 2 years. The independent variables included sociodemographic, socioeconomic, and health-related factors. 65.7% of the study population was aware of colonoscopy as a screening tool. Individuals from lower socioeconomic groups or those who only had primary education showed a lower level of awareness. 12.8% of participants had undergone a colonoscopy in the past 2 years. This number increased to 45% in the Spanish Autonomous Communities, where screening programs are in place. Colonoscopy screening rates are 10.28 times higher among those who had fecal occult blood testing during the previous 2 years. There is an inverse relationship between social inequality and both awareness and uptake of colonoscopy. Consequently, for screening to be more effective, interventions that reduce barriers to access for target populations should be implemented.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 03/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Self-reported red and processed meat intake has been positively associated with colorectal adenoma and cancer; however, measurement error in self-reported data can attenuate risk estimates, increasing the need for improved exposure assessment methods to better understand this association. A controlled feeding study revealed that urinary 1-methylhistidine and 3-methylhistidine levels were dose-dependently associated with meat intake; our aim was to examine these analytes in relation to colorectal adenoma. Individuals undergoing routine cancer screening by sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy were recruited for a colorectal adenoma case-control study; participants completed a food frequency questionnaire and a meat questionnaire, and donated urine. Urinary 1-methylhistidine and 3-methylhistidine levels were measured in 131 case-control pairs (age, sex, and smoking matched); odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by logistic regression. Although the mean self-reported red meat intake was higher in cases (59 g/day) than in controls (48 g/day), the mean urinary 1-methylhistidine and 3-methylhistidine levels did not differ by case status (P=0.72). Neither urinary 1-methylhistidine nor urinary 3-methylhistidine was associated with colorectal adenoma (ORcontinuous=0.90, 95% CI: 0.53-1.54; ORcontinuous=0.90, 95% CI: 0.69-1.17, respectively). A variable combining self-reported red meat intake with urinary 1-methylhistidine and 3-methylhistidine levels was not associated with colorectal adenoma. Analyzing urine samples from multiple days from 17 individuals revealed intraclass correlations of 0.52 and 0.49 for 1-methylhistidine and 3-methylhistidine, respectively; this variability could result in attenuated risks. Urinary 1-methylhistidine and 3-methylhistidine levels, measured in one sample, were not associated with colorectal adenoma.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 03/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There is speculation on an association between sweetened, carbonated beverage consumption and cancer risk. This study aimed to examine this issue. Over 50 independent estimates of risk were available, 11 for colas specifically. A random-effects meta-analysis was carried out with tests for publication bias performed as well as Higgins and Thompson's I measure of the percentage of heterogeneity between studies that could not be explained by chance. Over all the different sites of cancer, the summary relative risk (SRR), when all 55 independent estimates were considered together, was SRR=1.03 [95% confidence interval (0.96; 1.11)]. When individual cancer sites were considered, there was no significant increase or decrease in the meta-analysis estimate of risk of cancer of the pancreas, bladder, kidney, squamous cell or adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus, colon, gastric cardia, gastric noncardia, prostate, breast, larynx and ovary or of the oral cavity, pharynx or glioma. There was no evidence in a sensitivity analysis from those studies that reported results separately for colas of an associated risk of pancreas cancer [SRR=1.00, 95% confidence interval (0.61; 1.65)]. The results for all other forms of cancers were considerably hampered by poor methodology and small numbers of studies (mainly one report on each cancer site studied). Overall, the findings are reassuring in terms of the association between soft drinks, including colas, and cancer risk, although the quality of many of the studies is quite poor by acceptable, modern standards and no study has been carried out with use of carbonated beverages as a primary hypothesis.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 03/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gastrointestinal malignancies are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Most cases are diagnosed at an advanced stage and, as such, 5-year survival rates are poor. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at a post-transcriptional level. It is now evident that miRNAs are essential for normal physiological functioning, and aberrant miRNA expression is a hallmark of human cancers, including gastrointestinal cancers. Initially seen as a very promising source of breakthroughs in cancer management, there has been little translation of miRNA science from the bench to the bedside. This review will summarize the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal malignancies. Further, it will serve to highlight the potential role of miRNAs in cancer prevention: namely their use as biomarkers and as targets for chemoprevention.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 03/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Smoking is an established risk factor for cancer. However, most studies have been carried out on western populations, and less is known about the impact in central and eastern Europe. Our objective was to investigate the association between cigarette smoking, educational level and risk of cancer in a Lithuanian population-based cohort study. The study included 6976 men initially free from cancer. During the follow-up (1978-2008), 1780 cancer cases were identified. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). In addition, the burden of cancer attributable to smoking was assessed by the population attributable fraction. Following adjustment for age, education, alcohol consumption and BMI, for current compared with never smokers, highly significant and strongly elevated estimates were found for total (HR=1.79, 95% CI 1.59-2.02), tobacco-related (HR=2.52, 95% CI 2.16-2.95), upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) (HR=5.77, 95% CI 2.73-12.21), lung (HR=10.47, 95% CI 6.74-16.25), bladder (HR=3.31, 95% CI 1.71-6.41) and liver (HR=4.64, 95% CI 1.53-14.08) cancer. Findings suggest a lower risk of prostate cancer in current smokers. In addition, the occurrence of lung and UADT cancer was significantly elevated in men in the lowest educational attainment category. If smoking had not occurred, ∼23% of total cancer, 37% of tobacco-related, 77% of lung, 58% of UADT, 43% of liver and 45% of bladder cancer cases could have been prevented in this cohort of men. Cancer-control strategies focused on reducing smoking should be a public health priority.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 03/2014;
  • European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 03/2014; 23(2):148-9.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 03/2014; 23(2):110-2.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study investigated lung cancer and other diseases related to insoluble beryllium compounds. A cohort of 4950 workers from four US insoluble beryllium manufacturing facilities were followed through 2009. Expected deaths were calculated using local and national rates. On the basis of local rates, all-cause mortality was significantly reduced. Mortality from lung cancer (standardized mortality ratio 96.0; 95% confidence interval 80.0, 114.3) and from nonmalignant respiratory diseases was also reduced. There were no significant trends for either cause of death according to duration of employment or time since first employment. Uterine cancer among women was the only cause of death with a significantly increased standardized mortality ratio. Five of the seven women worked in office jobs. This study confirmed the lack of an increase in mortality from lung cancer and nonmalignant respiratory diseases related to insoluble beryllium compounds.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 03/2014;
  • European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 02/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Oral cancers (OCs) have a high mortality rate because of their typically late diagnosis. Primary care physicians play a vital role in early detection. In this study, we evaluated the family physicians' (FPs) knowledge, preventive attitudes, and behaviors in terms of OCs. A semistructured questionnaire consisting of 50 questions was prepared and distributed to 200 FPs. Questions were grouped under four main headings: demographic characteristics, general protective attitudes against OCs, risk factors, and daily practices while performing the necessary examinations and referrals. Of 200 FPs, 164 responded to the questionnaire (82% response rate). The mean age of the study participants was 34.8±8.4 years and the mean duration of practice was 10±8.1 years. One-third of the physicians (29.9%, n=49) stated that they did not inquire about the amount of tobacco use. In terms of alcohol use, 45.7% (n=75) and 56.7% (n=93) did not ask about past alcohol consumption or the amount of alcohol consumed, respectively. Moreover, 69.5% (n=114) believed that they did not receive adequate smoking cessation training and 79.9% (n=131) stated that they did not receive any alcohol cessation training. To decrease morbidity and mortality associated with OCs, primary care physicians should be trained to ask their patients about high-risk behaviors, provide counseling and education on tobacco and alcohol-abuse cessation, and provide oral examinations.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 02/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health burden worldwide and is the second-leading cause of cancer-related death in Europe. CRC is a complex disease resulting from a series of genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to a stepwise progression from normal mucosa to dysplasia and finally to carcinoma. In this study, we present genetic association results between 25 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms and CRC in a case-control study (203 cases, 296 controls) of a Han Chinese population. We found that rs1143634 in the interleukin-1β (IL1B) gene and rs1800871 in the interleukin-10 (IL10) gene were associated with increased risk for CRC in the Han Chinese. Further haplotype analysis revealed that the 'GAC' in the SMAD7 (mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 7) gene was found to increase CRC risk (odds ratio=1.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-2.01; P=0.012). Our results, combined with previous studies, suggest that IL10, PSCA, IL1B, and SMAD7 are significantly correlated with CRC susceptibility in the Han Chinese population.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 02/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Excise duties on roll-your-own (RYO) tobacco, which are generally based on RYO cigarettes containing 1 g of tobacco, are lower than duties on factory-made (FM) cigarettes. This provides a price incentive for smokers to switch to RYO, the use of which is increasing across Europe. To effectively approximate duties on the two types of products, accurate data on the weight of RYO cigarettes are required. We provide updated information on RYO use and RYO cigarette weight across Europe. From a representative face-to-face survey conducted in 2010 in 18 European countries (Albania, Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Croatia, England, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain and Sweden), we considered data from 5158 current smokers aged 15 years or above, with available information on daily consumption of FM and RYO cigarettes separately. In Europe, 10.4% of current smokers (12.9% of men and 7.5% of women) were 'predominant' RYO users (i.e. >50% of cigarettes smoked). This proportion was highest in England (27.3%), France (16.5%) and Finland (13.6%). The median weight of one RYO cigarette is 0.75 g (based on 192 smokers consuming exclusively RYO cigarettes). The proportion of RYO smokers is substantial in several European countries. Our finding on the weight of RYO cigarettes is consistent with the scientific literature and industry documents showing that the weight of RYO cigarettes is substantially lower than that of FM ones. Basing excise duties on RYO on an average cigarette weight of 0.75 g rather than 1 g would help increase the excise levels to those on FM cigarettes.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 02/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gastrin has been identified as the principal effector of gastric secretion, but several studies have demonstrated its role as a biomarker of cancer risk and as a growth factor for colorectal, stomach, liver, and pancreatic cancer. Hypergastrinemia characterizes autoimmune gastritis, with body and fundic gland atrophy and increased risk for both gastric adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. Gastric type I carcinoids develop in the context of autoimmune gastritis because of the stimulus exerted by gastrin on enterochromaffin-like cells and remain gastrin-sensitive for long durations because the removal of hypergastrinemia leads to tumor regression. The treatment of gastric carcinoid is still open to debate, but when the disease frequently relapses, or is multicentric or infiltrating, surgery is advocated or, in the alternative, a costly and long-lasting treatment with long-acting somatostatin analogues is prescribed. A technology allowing the preparation of an immunogen eliciting an immune system response with generation of antibodies against G17 has been developed. This vaccine has been tested in patients with colorectal, pancreatic or advanced gastric cancer. The vaccine has also been used in the treatment of gastric type I carcinoids, and the administration of G17DT in patients harboring these lesions leads to carcinoid regression. Antigastrin vaccination in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer obviously needs validation, but this immunotherapy may well represent a simple, inexpensive, and active 'adjuvant' treatment.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 01/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and one of the most feared diseases in modern society. A combination of early detection, accurate diagnosis and effective treatment provides the best defence against cancer morbidity; therefore, promoting cancer awareness and encouraging cancer screening is a priority in any comprehensive cancer control policy. Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the UK and in an effort to reduce the high incidence, prevalence, morbidity and mortality rates, the National Health Service (NHS) has introduced the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (NHS BCSP). For the NHS BCSP to succeed in its goal of reducing the incidence and prevalence rates for colorectal cancer, individuals need to be persuaded to complete the test. Since it was first introduced in 2007, however, participation rates have been low. In an effort to understand why participation rates remain low, this article reports on the findings of a series of focus groups conducted in the East Midlands of England. These focus groups were designed to explore the factors that influence an individual's decision to participate in cancer screening. The findings revealed eight factors that affected participation in the NHS BCSP: (i) the association of screening with entry into old age; (ii) prior experience with health systems; (iii) the support of a significant other; (iv) individual perceptions of risk (and benefit); (v) fear of becoming a cancer patient after the screening test; (vi) lack of disease symptoms; (vii) embarrassment associated with completing the test and (viii) messages that adopt a paternalistic ethos. Overall, our results suggest that more people may participate in the screening programme if it was more sensitive to these psychosocial and contextual factors that shape an individual's decision to be tested.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 01/2014;

Related Journals