The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care (Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care )

Publisher: European Society of Contraception, Taylor & Francis

Description

The Official Journal of the European Society of Contraception, The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care publishes original peer-reviewed research papers as well as review papers and other appropriate educational material. The Editors welcome submissions from members of the European Society of Contraception and also from non-members anywhere in the world.

  • Impact factor
    1.81
  • 5-year impact
    1.64
  • Cited half-life
    5.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.17
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.46
  • Website
    European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care, The website
  • Other titles
    European journal of contraception & reproductive health care (Online), European journal of contraception and reproductive health care
  • ISSN
    1473-0782
  • OCLC
    49885918
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives Antifertility effects of Dalbergia sissoo in male mice were investigated. Methods Adult Parkes strain male mice were orally administered aqueous leaf extract of Dalbergia sissoo (50 and 100 mg/kg body weight/day) or distilled water or no treatment (controls) for 35 days (n = 5/group). Motility, viability and number of spermatozoa in the cauda epididymidis; testis histology; serum level of testosterone; and toxicological parameters were evaluated. To assess reversibility, more mice were treated with 100 mg/kg body weight of Dalbergia sissoo or distilled water (n = 5/group) for 35 days and sacrificed 56 days later. Fertility was also assessed separately. Results Histologically, testes of Dalbergia-treated mice showed dissimilar degenerative changes in the seminiferous tubules. Significant reductions were noted (i) in epididymal sperm motility, viability and number, and (ii) in serum level of testosterone in Dalbergia-treated mice compared to controls. However, serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and creatinine, and haematological parameters were not affected. Also libido of Dalbergia–treated males showed no change, but their fertility was markedly suppressed. By 56 days of treatment withdrawal, alterations induced in the above parameters returned to control levels. Conclusions Dalbergia sissoo treatment caused reversible suppression of spermatogenesis and fertility in P mice, without eliciting detectable toxic effects.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In order to capitalise on new opportunities to advance contraceptive and reproductive health choices globally, organisations working in these fields will need to overcome six institutional obstacles. These are: (i) committee management; (ii) over-medicalisation; (iii) fear of risk and controversy; (iv) conferences, meetings, and symposia; (v) obsession with coordination; and (vi) fear of sex. The reproductive health community will require energy, innovative approaches, and a sharp focus on service delivery to address these hurdles that will otherwise slow down and misdirect programmatic momentum.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 07/2014;
  • The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 07/2014; 19(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To compare the sexual function of women with and without vaginal penetration difficulties (VPDs) and relate it to the sexual function of their male partners. Methods All consenting women attending a sexual medicine centre during 2005–2007 completed the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and answered questions about five VPDs (placement of a tampon, gynaecological examination, insertion of her or her partner's finger, and penile-vaginal intercourse). Male partners filled the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Results Full data were available for 223 women, and 118 male partners. Male partners of women with VPDs (n = 53) had lower sexual desire (p = 0.0225). The number of VPDs in the women concerned negatively correlated with their partners’ desire (r = − 0.18339, p = 0.0468) and erectile function (r = − 0.19848, p = 0.0312). All women with at least one VPD (n = 109) reported significantly more sexual pain (p < 0.0001) and had worse sexual function scores (p = 0.014) than women with no VPDs (n = 114). Women with VPDs other than penile-vaginal penetration had worse orgasmic functioning (p = 0.0119). Conclusions The women's VPDs are correlated with worse sexual functioning for them and for their male partners. The five VPDs are a practical and useful tool for identifying impaired sexual functioning.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives In China, considerable stigma surrounds sexual activity, contraception use and abortion among young unmarried women, and sex work remains illegal. This study examines characteristics of adolescent female sex workers (FSWs) associated with contraceptive use and abortion in Kunming, China. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between July 2010 and February 2011. Adolescent FSWs were recruited using snowball and convenience sampling. We present descriptive statistics, comparative analyses of socio-demographic and reproductive characteristics of respondents who had or had not used modern contraceptives, and assessed factors associated with prior abortion using simple odds ratios (ORs) and multivariate logistic regression adjustments. Results Twenty-seven percent of adolescent FSWs had never used any modern contraceptive. Condoms (69%) and oral contraceptives (38%) were most commonly reported, and less than 3% had ever relied on an intrauterine device. We found low rates of dual protection (34%). About half of the respondents reported one or more lifetime abortions. Inconsistent condom use, frequent alcohol use and longer-term cohabitation were associated with prior abortion. Conclusions Low consistent utilisation of modern contraceptives and of dual protection, and high rates of abortion, highlight the urgent need for early contact and continuous provision of comprehensive reproductive health services for adolescent FSWs.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 07/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To assess whether continuous and extended regimens (CRs/ERs) of combined hormonal contraceptives (CHCs) improve symptoms related to withdrawal bleeding or the hormone-free interval and to compare the efficacy, safety, and cost of CRs/ERs to those of conventional 28-day regimens. Study design A literature search of the PubMed database was conducted for randomised clinical trials (RCTs) and observational studies published in any language between 2006 and 2013. Results Sixteen RCTs and 14 observational studies evaluated issues related to our objectives. CRs/ERs, whose efficacy and safety were comparable to those described for conventional regimens, were preferred due to their improvement of symptoms related to withdrawal bleeding or the hormone-free interval and the lower costs resulting from the reduced incidence of these symptoms. Conclusion The contraceptive efficacy and safety of CR/ER use of CHCs is at least equal to that of 28-days conventional regimens, and this use may have some cost savings. CRs/ERs are recommended for women willing to take a CHC for treatment of symptoms related to withdrawal bleeding or the hormone-free interval.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To evaluate the impact of a 91-day extended regimen combined oral contraceptive (150 μg levonorgestrel [LNG]/30 μg ethinylestradiol [EE] for 84 days, followed by 10 μg EE for seven days [Treatment 1]) compared with two traditional 21/7 regimens (21 days 150 μg LNG/30 μg EE [Treatment 2] or 150 μg desogestrel [DSG]/30 μg EE [Treatment 3], both with seven days’ hormone free), on several coagulation factors and thrombin formation markers. Methods Randomised, open-label, parallel-group comparative study involving healthy women (18–40 years). The primary endpoint was change from baseline in prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2) levels over six months. Results A total of 187 subjects were included in the primary analysis. In all groups, mean F1 + 2 values were elevated after six months of treatment. Changes were comparable between Treatments 1 and 2 (least squares mean change: 170 pmol/L and 158 pmol/L, respectively) but noticeably larger after Treatment 3 (least squares mean change: 592 pmol/L). The haemostatic effects of Treatment 1 were comparable to those of Treatment 2 and noninferior to those of Treatment 3 (lower limit of 95% confidence interval [− 18.3 pmol/L] > − 130 pmol/L). Conclusions The LNG/EE regimens had similar effects on F1 + 2. Noninferiority was demonstrated between extended regimen LNG/EE and DSG/EE.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background There is no consensus concerning the most effective type of facilitator to promote healthy sexual behaviours in interventions targeting adolescents. Objectives To evaluate the facilitator's effect on the implementation of the COMPAS programme (Spanish acronym for Skills for Adolescents with Healthy Sexuality), a school-based HIV prevention protocol. Methods Participants were 832 Spanish scholars aged 14 to 18. Fifteen schools were randomly assigned to one of the three following schemes: COMPAS delivered by experts only; the same programme administered by experts and peers; or a control group, not exposed to any intervention. Results The experts achieved an improvement in HIV knowledge and attitudes towards HIV and condom use; however, experts associated to peers only succeeded in increasing HIV knowledge. The effect size of the changes indicated a greater positive change in the programme when applied by experts than by experts and peers. Conclusions The participation of peers as co-facilitators did not increase the efficacy of a programme delivered by experts to Spanish adolescents. Education delivered by experts was the most effective modality for reducing sexual risk. COMPAS is the only Spanish programme targeting the promotion of safer sex behaviours in adolescents whose efficacy has been evaluated with different health agents in Spain.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 06/2014; Early Online:1-13.
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    ABSTRACT: Objective A comprehensive life course perspective of women's experiences in obtaining and using contraception in Australia is lacking. This paper explores free-text comments about contraception provided by women born between 1973 and 1978 who participated in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). Methods The ALSWH is a national population-based cohort study involving over 40,000 women from three age groups, who are surveyed every three years. An initial search identified 1600 comments from 690 women across five surveys from 1996 (when they were aged 18–23 years) to 2009 (31–36 years). The analysis included 305 comments from 289 participants. Factors relating to experiences of barriers to access and optimal contraceptive use were identified and explored using thematic analysis. Results Five themes recurred across the five surveys as women aged: (i) side effects affecting physical and mental health; (ii) lack of information about contraception; (iii) negative experiences with health services; (iv) contraceptive failure; and (v) difficulty with accessing contraception. Conclusion Side effects of hormonal contraception and concerns about contraceptive failure influence women's mental and physical health. Many barriers to effective contraception persist throughout women's reproductive lives. Further research is needed into reducing barriers and minimising negative experiences, to ensure optimal contraceptive access for Australian women.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To identify factors involved in women's decisions to choose particular contraceptive methods and more specifically, incentives and disincentives to use three long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods: injectables, implants, and intrauterine devices/systems (IUDs/IUSs). Methods A total of 502 women aged 18 to 30 completed a cross-sectional online questionnaire. Results The three most important factors in choosing a contraceptive method were: high efficacy at preventing pregnancy, protection against sexually transmitted infections, and non-interference with sexual intercourse. The most common incentives for LARC use were the high efficacy and long duration of action. Disincentives included the possibility of irregular bleeding and concerns about effects on fertility; fear of needles and pain was a particular disincentive for IUD/IUS use. Only 93 (18%) of the participants reported ever having used a LARC. Conclusions Reported disincentives to LARC use (e.g., concern about effects on future fertility) indicated that many young women hold inaccurate beliefs about these methods. The relatively high proportions of women who held neutral attitudes about LARCs (21–40%, depending on the method) highlight the importance of education and contraceptive counselling to improve knowledge about the advantages of these methods.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background There is a cultural gap between girls with virginity problems and the western healthcare professionals (HCPs) they approach for help. Method The lack of knowledge concerning virginity-related issues among non-Western migrants in the Netherlands is illustrated by means of a selection of quotations from messages received by a single sexual health service. The differences in cultural beliefs between non-Western and Western societies are also overviewed. Conclusion HCPs should have a better grasp of the ins and outs of the virginity norms prevailing in migrant communities. This would enable them to counsel the young women concerned more efficiently and to find practical, culturally acceptable solutions to their dilemmas. Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/13625187.2014.911272
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To evaluate the quality of the sexual life of healthy women who are using a contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR) in extended cycles. Methods Fifty-two women (18 to 32 years old) seeking hormonal contraception were enrolled in this prospective study. Women were to use a CVR releasing daily 15 μg of ethinylestradiol (EE) and 120 μg of etonogestrel (ENG) for 63 days, followed by a four-day hormone-free interval, for two such extended cycles. At baseline and at the first (day 63–73) and second (day 126–134) follow-ups the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaires were administered to investigate, respectively, sexual behaviour and the quality of life (QoL). The Female Sexual Distress Scale (FSDS) was used to verify whether sexual dysfunction caused significant personal distress to the woman. Results The FSFI and FSDS scores obtained at the first and second follow-up appointments detected an improvement with respect to the baseline score (p < 0.05). QoL measures of body pain, general health and emotional role improved at the first follow-up visit (p < 0.05); at the second one, all variables showed improvement (p < 0.05). Conclusion According to these preliminary data the CVR in extended cycles could improve the sexual function and the QoL of women.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To describe the degree to which Romanian women access free prenatal care services, and to describe the demographic profile of women who are at risk for underutilisation. Methods: Secondary data (n = 914) were taken from a large, nationally representative sample of Romanian mothers and children (N = 2117). Kotelchuck's Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilisation Index was used to measure the adequacy of prenatal care. Results: Seventy-eight percent of mothers underutilised prenatal care services. Those who did so to the greatest degree were likely to be young, members of an ethnic minority, poor, uneducated, and rural. Conversely, those who utilised care to the greatest degree were likely to be older, members of the ethnic majority, wealthy, educated, and city dwelling. Conclusion: Despite the fact that many of the risk factors for underutilisation in this sample were similar to those found elsewhere in Europe and the developed world, these findings illustrate the worrisome magnitude of the problem in Romania, particularly among women with low levels of income and educational attainment. Future studies should examine factors that contribute to underutilisation, whether it corresponds to negative health outcomes, and whether targeted social interventions and outreach could help improve care.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Several randomised controlled trials have been published in the last few years which evaluated the efficacy of various analgesics in reducing visual analogue (VAS) pain scores during intrauterine device (IUD) placement. Their results seem to be conflicting and inconclusive. Methods We searched Medline (1966-2013), Scopus (2004-2013), Clinicaltrials.org (1997-2013), Popline (1973-2013), Cochrane CENTRAL (1999-2013) and Google Scholar (2004-2013) engines for published randomised controlled trials, as well as the reference lists from all electronically retrieved studies. Results Thirteen studies, involving 1353 women, were finally included in the present meta-analysis. Among the products used, and with respect to their mode of delivery, only paracervical lidocaine was effective in producing lower VAS pain scores related to tenaculum placement (mean difference [MD]: - 20.54; 95% confidence interval [CI]: - 39.92, - 1.15) and IUD insertion (MD: - 28.99; 95% CI: - 53.14, - 4.84). Misoprostol produced higher VAS pain scores for the immediate post-insertion period (MD: 2.83; 95% CI: - 0.79, 6.45) and it caused various side effects. Conclusion Paracervical administration of lidocaine prior to IUD insertion reduces VAS pain scores. In view of the small number of studies assessing its efficacy further studies should confirm our findings.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 05/2014;
  • Article: Editorial.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 05/2014; 19 Suppl 1:S1-2.
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To compare vaginal microflora and cervical cytology before and after insertion of a copper-containing intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) or a levonorgestrel releasing-intrauterine system (LNG-IUS). Methods Between April 2009 and February 2011, all women requesting insertion of an intrauterine contraceptive for family planning or noncontraceptive indications were enrolled. One hundred and eight Cu-IUDs and 42 LNG-IUSs were placed. Cervical cytological and vaginal microbiological findings before insertion and after 12 months were recorded. Results With regard to cervical cytology, nonspecific inflammatory changes became more frequent (but not significantly so; p = 0.062) after one year of use of a Cu-IUD, whereas their prevalence remained unchanged among women fitted with a LNG-IUS. Colonisation by Candida spp. and mycoplasma infections were diagnosed significantly more often after one year of use of the Cu-IUD than at baseline. During the study period, women wearing a Cu-IUD complained significantly more frequently of vaginal discharge, pelvic pain, and increased menstrual flow. Conclusion Use of a Cu-IUD - but not that of a LNG-IUS - was associated with an alteration of the vaginal flora and showed a trend towards a higher frequency of nonspecific inflammatory changes affecting cervical cytology.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 04/2014;

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