Public Management Review (PUBLIC MANAG REV )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Public Management Review seeks to: explore the developing field of public management embrace research both about the strategic and operational management of public services and about social/public policy development and implementation encourage in particular work which either presents new empirical knowledge about public management and/or developed theory encourage questioning both of the legitimacy and hegemony of the 'new public management' paradigm and its alternatives, and of the developing pluralism in public management which encompasses the governance of inter-sectoral relationships between government, non-profit and for-profit organisations in the provision of public services. The remit of Public Management Review will be to promote the dissemination and discussion of such research about public management. Its specific target audience will be the academic and research community. Public Management Review will be an international journal, seeking to draw together and learn lessons from the development of public management across the world rather than being parochially focused upon one area and will encourage cross-national and comparative research papers. The journal will promote inter-disciplinary work. Much of the most important work about public management is coming at the cusp of traditional disciplines. Public Management Review will promote such cross-boundary learning and conceptualisation. This project is uniquely placed to offer a leading light on the rapidly developing interest in public management across the world, and especially in Europe, North America and the Pacific Rim. It will cover such key issues as: social policy making and implementation in the plural state inter-sectoral (government non-profit-for profit) relationships the evaluation and critique of the 'new public management' paradigm governance institutions and processes globalization and convergence in public management state reform and structural adjustment, and the operational/ strategic management of public service organisations, including such issues as contracting, marketing and strategic management.

  • Impact factor
    0.92
  • 5-year impact
    1.33
  • Cited half-life
    7.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.14
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.46
  • Website
    Public Management Review website
  • Other titles
    Public management review (Online)
  • ISSN
    1471-9037
  • OCLC
    47766654
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Public administrations are launching smart cards for citizens’ identification and access to local public services. Despite being focused on citizens’ demands, there is a lack of acceptance of such initiatives. This study explores the key drivers of citizen adoption of smart cards and reveals that, in addition to utilitarian benefits, social processes, such as citizens’ identification with the city, affect individual adoption. The effect of place identity is moderated by citizens’ level of interdependence. The discussion highlights place branding and the support of local collectives as strategic governmental instruments for achieving a critical mass of smart card users.
    Public Management Review 11/2014; 16(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Non-profit organizations (NPOs) are major providers of services in many fields of endeavour, and often receive financial support from government. This article investigates different forms of government/non-profit funding relationships, with the viewpoint being mainly, though not exclusively, from the perspective of the non-profit agencies. While there are a number of existing typologies of government/NPO relations, these are dated and in need of further empirical analysis and testing. The article advances an empirically derived extension to current models of government/NPO relations. A future research agenda is outlined based on the constructs that underpin typologies, rather than discrete categorization of relationships.
    Public Management Review 11/2014; 16(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Third sector partnerships are under pressure to change in the light of the increasing cost pressures on local public services. The literature throws doubt on the level of economies of scale and suggests that more attention should be given to economies of scope and learning. The common conflation of economies of size with economies of scale has led policymakers to overemphasize larger scale providers and has distorted the strategies which third sector organizations have adopted, pushing them towards mergers and consortia based on scale.
    Public Management Review 11/2014; 16(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The theme of partnership with the third sector has been on the agenda of public management research for a long time now, not least in this journal. As an introduction to a special issue on this topic, the article discusses two issues crucial to further study of this phenomenon. The first on the types or categories that can be distinguished when comparing these partnerships between countries or policy fields; the second how recent public management reforms (especially of the New Public Management variety) have affected the nature of third sector organizations and their role in relation to the state.
    Public Management Review 11/2014; 16(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Since the 2008 financial crisis, the third sector policy and regulatory regimes in the ‘Anglo-Saxon cluster’ have been subject to considerable policy churn. Comparing the reforms in the ‘meta-policies,’ regulations and financing in England, US, Canada and Australia, this analysis identifies both significant policy convergence and divergence. A new ideational landscape has emerged that is dominated by a focus on transparency, impact and social innovation. Convergence is not the whole story, however. In particular, the overarching meta-policies are absent, increasingly weak or divisive, suggesting a future characterized by the sporadic intervention of parochial politics and the likelihood of increased difference.
    Public Management Review 11/2014; 16(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We test a typology of public–private partnerships by using survey data on the relationship between non-profit organizations (NPOs) and Flemish local governments. We found that quite strong relations occur, but this is not a uniform picture: although most NPOs are not financially dependent on local government, there is a variation in NPO–local government contacts. We observe that NPOs active in poverty fighting, or in integration of ethnic minorities, build stronger relations, compared to NPOs in elderly care or youth care. Our analysis allows to refine the original typology by adding intermediate positions on the initial dichotomous scales of ‘dependence’ and ‘nearness’.
    Public Management Review 10/2014; 16(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Formalization has long been regarded as one of the most distinctive features of the public sector. Personnel systems in the public sector are particularly formalized due to merit system protections and strong due process requirements. In much of the contemporary public management literature, personnel formalization implies red tape, referring to excessive rules that bring negative outcomes such as employee frustration. The present study offers an alternative view, suggesting that personnel formalization results in high-performance work practices, particularly teamwork, by ensuring that organizations attract the right employees and provide employees with various protections such as worker safety, procedural justice and conflict resolution. Given that public organizations are structured more formally, public sector employees are more likely to work in teams than their peers in the private sector. The authors test this view by using variables from the National Organization Survey (NOS) data set and find strong statistical support. Therefore, personnel formalization is not necessarily equivalent to red tape and not always detrimental to the public sector. It enhances teamwork, a central element of high-performance work practices.
    Public Management Review 10/2014; 16(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Drawing on sociological neo-institutional theory and models of higher education governance, we examine current developments in Bulgaria and Lithuania and explore to what extent those developments were shaped by the Bologna reform. We analyse to what extent the state has moved away from a model of state-centred policy design and control to a model of governance based on the ‘evaluative state’ Neave (1998), in which the state ensures ‘product control’ and promotes competition and quality. To do so, we look, in particular, at funding policy and the emergence of a system of quality assurance. To conclude, we examine whether the governance patterns of both countries have converged and identify the factors accounting for potential variations.
    Public Management Review 10/2014; 16(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The idea that performance indicators in public management have unintended consequences is almost as old as performance measurement itself. But, is ‘unintended consequences’ an appropriate and insightful idea? The very term rests on an identification of intentions and assumptions about validity that are demonstrably problematic. Based on a distinction between trivial and advanced measure fixation, an argument is made for constitutive effects that are based on less problematic assumptions. Through this conceptual move, the political dimension of performance indicators is appreciated. The conceptual dimensions of constitutive effects are carved out, empirical illustrations of their applicability are offered and implications discussed.
    Public Management Review 10/2014; 16(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In all OECD countries, populations and workforces are ageing, with public services generally being older than broader labour markets. Governments are concerned at the looming capacity crisis and identifying policy responses. However, they have generally identified the problem as a simple change in demographics. This article adds a new perspective to this policy debate. Using a study of an Australian state public service, it identifies an association between changes in public employment policies and changes in the workforce age profile. It suggests that current employment policies, which replaced the traditional focus on youth recruitment with a more open public sector labour market, have made it inevitable that public workforces would age and be older than the general labour market. Policy responses to the older public workforce need to go beyond demographic explanations, to accept the older public workforce as the new norm, and align public employment policies accordingly.
    Public Management Review 10/2014; 16(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Based on an analysis of the post-Soviet transformation experience of four defence sector organizations in a Russian region where the defence sector occupies a substantial part of the local economy, this article develops a typology of network relationships: Grooved Inter-relationship Patterns (Gr’ip) networks and Fluid Inter-relationship Patterns (Fl’ip) networks. This typology can be applied to a range of transition/emerging market and low system trust contexts. Gr’ip networks, in this case, represent the persisting legacy of the Soviet command-administrative system. Fl’ip networks are here an attempt by the defence companies to link into the civilian supply chains of a developing market economy. This article argues that Gr’ip networks had and still have a crucial role to play in Russian enterprises’ survival and development.
    Public Management Review 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper argues that justifying lack of productivity improvements in public services by referring to Baumol’s Cost Disease (BCD) is conceptually confused, theoretically misspecified and empirically blind. BCD misconceptualizes public services as categorically distinct from manufactured goods and is based on a theory of productivity not directly applicable to many public services, therefore failing to recognize evidence of substantial scope for improving public services’ productivity. Analysis of the structural and behavioural unbundling of value creation and decomposition of professional skills in service provision leads this paper to conclude that public services are not as technologically non-progressive as BCD asserts.
    Public Management Review 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Research in the field of representative bureaucracy provides evidence that the presence of minority teachers can improve educational outcomes for minority students. We test two possible mechanisms by examining if the presence of minority teachers increases how ‘connected’ minority students feel to their school and the student's educational aspirations. Previous research has established a strong link between both of these factors and educational and non-educational outcomes. We find that increasing representation of African American and Latino/a teachers increases educational expectations for African American students, while increasing representation of Latino/a teachers increases school connectedness and educational expectations for Latino/a students.
    Public Management Review 05/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Within recent years, Denmark has implemented a number of preventive policies based on the line of reasoning that it is better to prevent than to solve problems. Preventive policies express political intentions aimed at solving core welfare state problems, but policy goals are ambiguous and vague, and policy tools are often poorly specified. Thus, front-line workers (FLWs) are pinpointed as key persons to implement these policies, because they hold a ‘specific knowledge’ about and ‘close acquaintance’ with citizens. In the article, we explore different types of front-line work, implementing preventive policies, and identifying children in need of a special effort.
    Public Management Review 05/2014; 16(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lipsky’s seminal concept of street-level bureaucrats (SLBs) focuses on their role as public servants. However, in the course of new modes of governance, private actors have gained an additional role as implementation agents. We explore the logic of private SLBs during the implementation of the Swiss Ordinance on Veterinary Medicinal Products (OVMP) where veterinarians are simultaneously implementing agents, policy addressees, and professionals with economic interests. We argue that, because of contradictory reference systems, it is problematic for the output performance if an actor is simultaneously the target group of a policy and its implementing agent.
    Public Management Review 05/2014; 16(481-502).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many organizations have introduced service charters to improve service quality and user satisfaction. However, this goal is not always achieved, with the literature showing both implementation successes and failures. In this article, we analyse the organizational enablers for the implementation of service charters using a concept mapping methodology with an integrated Delphi study. Our empirical investigation, with the support of forty-five experts who had worked with public service charters in the Netherlands, has resulted in a framework involving forty-four organizational enablers. It shows that implementing a service charter requires a change management process that addresses both structures/systems and cultural aspects.
    Public Management Review 05/2014; 16(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Studies of street-level bureaucracy have introduced a variety of conceptualizations, research approaches, and causal inferences. While this research has produced several insights, the impact of variety in the institutional context has not been adequately explored. We present the construct of a public service gap as a way to incorporate contextual factors and facilitate comparison. This construct addresses the differences between what is asked of and what is offered to public servants working at the street level. The heuristic enables the systematic capture of macro- and meso-contextual influences, thus enhancing comparative research on street-level bureaucracy.
    Public Management Review 05/2014; 16(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sector switching is interesting in relation to understanding how to get and keep people working in the public sector as well as to understand public and private differences. This paper focuses on why public employees leave public organizations to work in the private sector. We use a design studying higher educated Danish employees who recently worked in the state, comparing those who shift job to another public organization with those who switch to the private sector. We focus on different motives for job shifts which may influence sector switching such as salary, job security, organizational characteristics and public service motivation.
    Public Management Review 05/2014; 16(4).