Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry

Publisher: Association for Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Blackwell Publishing

Description

The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry is internationally recognised to be the leading journal covering both child and adolescent psychology and psychiatry. Articles published include experimental and developmental studies, especially those relating to developmental psychopathology and the developmental disorders. An important function of the Journal is to bring together empirical research, clinical studies and reviews of high quality arising from different theoretical perspectives.

  • Impact factor
    5.42
  • 5-year impact
    6.24
  • Cited half-life
    8.50
  • Immediacy index
    0.98
  • Eigenfactor
    0.03
  • Article influence
    2.30
  • Website
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, The website
  • Other titles
    Journal of child psychology and psychiatry and allied disciplines (Online), Journal of child psychology and psychiatry
  • ISSN
    1469-7610
  • OCLC
    48799103
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Blackwell Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Some journals impose embargoes typically of 6 or 12 months, occasionally of 24 months
    • no listing of affected journals available as yet
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's server, institutional server or subject-based server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement ("The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com")
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'Blackwell Publishing' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In 2002 Helena Kraemer and colleagues published an important article on the analysis of clinical trials in mental health, which advocated a planned focus on mechanisms to investigate the processes behind treatment effects. Kraemer et al. considered not only new approaches to mediation analysis, but also a theoretical approach to factors, both pre-treatment and during treatment, that might moderate this mediation. Trials should not just be about whether a treatment 'worked', but how it worked; with the results informing modification of the intervention for the next trial by discarding aspects that were not effective and reinforcing aspects that were - an iterative procedure towards greater effectiveness. Can we enjoy similar ambitions for complex interventions within mental health? It is not so long ago when the received wisdom within the clinical and much of the research community was that it was simply impossible in practice to mount randomised controlled trials relevant to the kind of psychosocial interventions we use in child and adolescent mental health (CAMHS). How different the situation is now, with burgeoning interest in a systematic evidence base for psychological treatment and the possibilities for unexpected advances (as well as unexpected harms). Nevertheless it is probably still fair to say that the systematic use of process and mechanism study within trials in our field is the exception rather than the rule. What are the possibilities and implications for our field? © 2014 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 01/2015; 56(1):1-3.
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    ABSTRACT: It is generally believed that parental rejection of children leads to child maladaptation. However, the specific effects of perceived parental acceptance-rejection on diverse domains of child adjustment and development have been incompletely documented, and whether these effects hold across diverse populations and for mothers and fathers are still open questions. This study assessed children's perceptions of mother and father acceptance-rejection in 1,247 families from China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States as antecedent predictors of later internalizing and externalizing behavior problems, school performance, prosocial behavior, and social competence. Higher perceived parental rejection predicted increases in internalizing and externalizing behavior problems and decreases in school performance and prosocial behavior across 3 years controlling for within-wave relations, stability across waves, and parental age, education, and social desirability bias. Patterns of relations were similar across mothers and fathers and, with a few exceptions, all nine countries. Children's perceptions of maternal and paternal acceptance-rejection have small but nearly universal effects on multiple aspects of their adjustment and development regardless of the family's country of origin. © 2014 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background Through the increased availability and sophistication of genetic testing, it is now possible to identify causal diagnoses in a growing proportion of children with neurodevelopmental disorders. In addition to developmental delay and intellectual disability, many genetic disorders are associated with high risks of psychopathology, which curtail the wellbeing of affected individuals and their families. Beyond the identification of significant clinical needs, understanding the diverse pathways from rare genetic mutations to cognitive dysfunction and emotional–behavioural disturbance has theoretical and practical utility.Methods We overview (based on a strategic search of the literature) the state-of-the-art on causal mechanisms leading to one of the most common childhood behavioural diagnoses – attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) – in the context of specific genetic disorders. We focus on new insights emerging from the mapping of causal pathways from identified genetic differences to neuronal biology, brain abnormalities, cognitive processing differences and ultimately behavioural symptoms of ADHD.FindingsFirst, ADHD research in the context of rare genotypes highlights the complexity of multilevel mechanisms contributing to psychopathology risk. Second, comparisons between genetic disorders associated with similar psychopathology risks can elucidate convergent or distinct mechanisms at each level of analysis, which may inform therapeutic interventions and prognosis. Third, genetic disorders provide an unparalleled opportunity to observe dynamic developmental interactions between neurocognitive risk and behavioural symptoms. Fourth, variation in expression of psychopathology risk within each genetic disorder points to putative moderating and protective factors within the genome and the environment.ConclusionA common imperative emerging within psychopathology research is the need to investigate mechanistically how developmental trajectories converge or diverge between and within genotype-defined groups. Crucially, as genetic predispositions modify interaction dynamics from the outset, longitudinal research is required to understand the multi-level developmental processes that mediate symptom evolution.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: PreambleIn the JCPP Virtual Issues series, editors are invited to look back over our catalogue and identify papers that illustrate the journal's influence on the emergence of specific fields within the broader domains of child psychology and psychiatry. This virtual issue1,2 focuses specifically on the last 30 years of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) research. While the journal has published papers on nearly every aspect of this condition our initial scoping exercise highlighted a particular impact in two areas: neuropsychology and behavioural genetics. Here we address the JCPPs contribution to contemporary understanding of the neuropsychology of ADHD. We are planning to put together a further Virtual Issue on behavioural genetics in the near future.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 12/2014; 55(12).
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    ABSTRACT: We first give a brief introduction to graph theoretical analysis and its application to the study of brain network topology or connectomics. Within this framework, we review the existing empirical data on developmental changes in brain network organization across a range of experimental modalities (including structural and functional MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography in humans). We discuss preliminary evidence and current hypotheses for how the emergence of network properties correlates with concomitant cognitive and behavioural changes associated with development. We highlight some of the technical and conceptual challenges to be addressed by future developments in this rapidly moving field. Given the parallels previously discovered between neural systems across species and over a range of spatial scales, we also review some recent advances in developmental network studies at the cellular scale. We highlight the opportunities presented by such studies and how they may complement neuroimaging in advancing our understanding of brain development. Finally, we note that many brain and mind disorders are thought to be neurodevelopmental in origin and that charting the trajectory of brain network changes associated with healthy development also sets the stage for understanding abnormal network development. We therefore briefly review the clinical relevance of network metrics as potential diagnostic markers and some recent efforts in computational modelling of brain networks which might contribute to a more mechanistic understanding of neurodevelopmental disorders in future. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background Child and adolescent mental health problems are common, associated with wide-ranging functional impairments, and show substantial continuities into adult life. It is therefore important to understand the extent to which the prevalence of mental health problems has changed over time, and to identify reasons behind any trends in mental health.Scope and MethodologyThis review evaluates evidence on whether the population prevalence of child and adolescent mental health problems has changed. The primary focus of the review is on epidemiological cross-cohort comparisons identified by a systematic search of the literature (using the Web of Knowledge database).FindingsClinical diagnosis and treatment of child and adolescent psychiatric disorders increased over recent decades. Epidemiological comparisons of unselected population cohorts using equivalent assessments of mental health have found little evidence of an increased rate of ADHD, but cross-cohort comparisons of rates of ASD are lacking at this time. Findings do suggest substantial secular change in emotional problems and antisocial behaviour in high-income countries, including periods of increase and decrease in symptom prevalence. Evidence from low- and middle-income countries is very limited. Possible explanations for trends in child and adolescent mental health are discussed. The review also addresses how cross-cohort comparisons can provide valuable complementary information on the aetiology of mental illness.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Historians of science continue to debate the importance of individual inspiration and personal creativity as fuel in the engine of scientific progress. While true that, in general, scientific knowledge advances cautiously by careful experimentation, painstaking observation and the gradual accumulation of evidence occasionally a field of enquiry can be revolutionised by a single, perhaps simple, yet inspired and profound insight. Such breakthroughs are most likely to occur when an individual moves outside the intellectual tramlines that normally constrain scientific thinking, leaving them able to look at old evidence in new and original ways. The reception of such original insights by the research community varies considerably, of course. Some insights may be ‘too original’ – a step too far in what is normally an incremental journey of discovery. Some ideas, enthusiastically accepted initially, may burn out before making any real impression. Other ideas revolutionize a field – producing a cascade of hypotheses and lines of enquiry that lead to new discoveries which permanently change the scientific landscape. The issue of scientific creativity was very much in my mind when reading through the papers slated to appear in the current journal number. One article in particular, by Pannekoeke and colleagues on intrinsic brain organisation in depressed adolescents, initiated a chain of thought that led me to my focus for this editorial. A development that provides perhaps the most compelling recent example of the transformative power of individual inspiration in the field of cognitive neuroscience – a development which is also beginning to have profound implications for models of childhood mental disorders.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 12/2014; 55(12).
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    ABSTRACT: Background Although emotion dysregulation is not a defining feature of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), there is a growing consensus that emotional problems play a prominent role in this disorder.Methods The present study examined a wide range of emotion regulation (ER) strategies in 32 individuals with ASD compared to 31 group-matched typically developing (TD) participants in three emotional domains (anger, anxiety, and amusement). Parents of individuals with ASD and TD individuals were interviewed about their child's emotional experience and the use and efficacy of 10 ER strategies. In addition, participants filled out daily diaries on experience and regulation in the same emotional domains.ResultsCompared to TD individuals, parents reported that individuals with ASD experienced more anger and anxiety and less amusement, made less frequent use of a variety of adaptive ER strategies (e.g. problem solving, cognitive reappraisal), and made more frequent use of maladaptive strategies (e.g. repetitive behavior). Moreover, individuals with ASD were less effective at utilizing adaptive ER strategies. Self-reports showed differences in experience of amusement and in ER strategies for anger and anxiety, but not in experience of anger and anxiety.Conclusions This study provides evidence that individuals with ASD less frequently use adaptive – but more frequently use maladaptive – ER strategies. Implications for ASD treatments that focus on increasing the use of adaptive strategies are discussed.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background‘Optimal outcomes’ of child and adolescent psychiatric disorders may mean the best possible outcome, or the best considering a child's history. Most research into the outcomes of child and adolescent psychiatric disorder concentrates on the likelihood of adult illness and disability given an earlier history of psychopathology.Methods In this article, we review the research literature (based on a literature search using PubMed, RePORT and Google Advanced Scholar databases) on including optimal outcomes for young people with a history of anxiety, depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, or substance use disorders in childhood or adolescence. We consider three types of risks that these children may run later in development: future episodes of the same disorder, future episodes of a different disorder, and functional impairment. The impact of treatment or preventative interventions on early adult functioning is briefly reviewed.ResultsWe found that very few studies enabled us to answer our questions with certainty, but that in general about half of adults with a psychiatric history were disorder-free and functioning quite well in their 20s or 30s. However, their chance of functioning well was less than that of adults without a psychiatric history, even in the absence of a current disorder.Conclusions Among adults who had a psychiatric disorder as a child or adolescent, about half can be expected to be disorder-free as young adults, and of these about half will be free of significant difficulties in the areas of work, health, relationships, and crime. Optimal outcomes are predicted by a mixture of personal characteristics and environmental supports.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: There is abundant evidence that offspring of depressed mothers are at increased risk for persistent behavior problems related to emotion regulation, but the mechanisms by which offspring incur this risk are not entirely clear. Early adverse caregiving experiences have been associated with structural alterations in the amygdala and hippocampus, which parallel findings of cortical regions altered in adults with behavior problems related to emotion regulation. This study examined whether exposure to maternal depression during childhood might predict increased aggression and/or depression in early adulthood, and whether offspring amygdala:hippocampal volume ratio might mediate this relationship. Participants were 258 mothers and sons at socioeconomic risk for behavior problems. Sons' trajectories of exposure to maternal depression were generated from eight reports collected prospectively from offspring ages 18 months to 10 years. Offspring brain structure, aggression, and depression were assessed at age 20 (n = 170). Persistent, moderately high trajectories of maternal depression during childhood predicted increased aggression in adult offspring. In contrast, stable and very elevated trajectories of maternal depression during childhood predicted depression in adult offspring. Increased amygdala: hippocampal volume ratios at age 20 were significantly associated with concurrently increased aggression, but not depression, in adult offspring. Offspring amygdala: hippocampal volume ratio mediated the relationship found between trajectories of moderately elevated maternal depression during childhood and aggression in adult offspring. Alterations in the relative size of brain structures implicated in emotion regulation may be one mechanism by which offspring of depressed mothers incur increased risk for the development of aggression. © 2014 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Differences in how developmental pathways interact dynamically in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) likely contribute in important ways to phenotypic heterogeneity. This study aimed to model longitudinal reciprocal associations between social competence (SOC) and language (LANG) pathways in young children with ASD.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between reward sensitivity and pediatric anxiety is poorly understood. Evidence suggests that alterations in reward processing are more characteristic of depressive than anxiety disorders. However, some studies have reported that anxiety disorders are also associated with perturbations in reward processing. Heterogeneity in the forms of anxiety studied may account for the differences between studies. We used the feedback-negativity, an event-related potential sensitive to monetary gains versus losses (ΔFN), to examine whether different forms of youth anxiety symptoms were uniquely associated with reward sensitivity as indexed by neural reactivity to the receipt of positive and negative monetary outcomes.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The field of mental health and psychosocial support for children in humanitarian emergencies has been evolving rapidly. A decade ago, researchers and practitioners frequently took a deficits approach that emphasized problems such as trauma, particularly post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), in zones of armed conflict. Assessments focused on PTSD and typically led to the provision of curative responses such as Western psychotherapies as the first response for the affected population. Practitioners expressed diverse concerns about this approach, including its narrow, medicalized definition of the problem (mental disorder), the unsustainability of the programs it generated, the relative inattention to the context, the privileging of individual over systemic approaches, and the lack of cultural sensitivity. For these and other reasons, humanitarian practitioners have increasingly favored a resilience approach that features the agency of children, families, and communities and seeks to build upon existing assets or strengths. Already there is evidence of the effectiveness of numerous interventions that embody a resilience approach. Yet resilience approaches have been limited by a lack of conceptual clarity and ongoing questions about how to assess and measure it. In this context, Michael Ungar's Practitioner Review is an important contribution to practice.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: If your child had leukaemia you would be distraught. Yet, there would also be hope. Most children with a diagnosis of leukaemia start their treatment as part of ongoing trials. The clinical teams looking after such children are motivated, knowledgeable and work in centres that specialise in the treatment of this lethal illness. The results speak for themselves. Not only have the trials helped oncologists learn more about which treatments work best. For years we have known that those who enter trials do better than those patients with similar characteristics who don't. We have recently also learnt that trials improve survival rates in those cancers population wide: the annual reduction between 1978–2005 in risk of death from childhood cancers ranged from 2.7% to 12.0%. This cancer trial culture is a splendid example of British health care delivery. What is happening in child psychiatry, though? If your child had, say, depression you would have every reason to be distraught too. The mortality rate is higher than in the general population and the burden of disease in the long run heavier than that of cardiovascular illness or cancer. Yet, your child would not have access to a trial. Instead, you would probably struggle to have your child's depression recognised in the first place. The care you would get would be determined by extreme regional variations and by what resources are available to local services and often the ideology or preferences of practitioners.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 11/2014; 55(11).
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    ABSTRACT: The JCPP has just published a virtual issue focusing specifically on the journal's contribution to progress in the field of ADHD neuropsychology over last 30 years and its role in establishing the foundations of next generation ADHD neuropsychology models. The virtual issue is structured around six themes. Here we provide a précis of the issue summarizing these themes and illustrating each with a reference to an influential paper published over the last 5 years.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 11/2014; 55(11).
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    ABSTRACT: Background Dialogic book-sharing is an interactive form of shared reading. It has been shown in high income countries (HICs) to be of significant benefit to child cognitive development. Evidence for such benefit in low and middle income countries (LMICs) is scarce, although a feasibility study of our own produced encouraging findings. Accordingly, we aimed to establish the impact on child language and attention of providing training in dialogic booksharing to carers of infants in an impoverished South African community.Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial in Khayelitsha, an informal settlement in South Africa. Mothers of infants aged between 14 and 16 months were recruited and randomized to either 8 weeks of manualized training in dialogic book-sharing or a no-intervention control group. Independent assessments were made of infant language and attention at baseline and following training. The trial was registered (ISRCTN39953901).ResultsNinety one carer-infant dyads were recruited and randomized to the intervention group (n = 49) or the control group (n = 42), 82 (90%) of whom were available for follow-up assessments. On a standardized carer report of infant vocabulary, compared to those in the control group, carers who received the intervention reported a significantly greater increase in the number of words understood by their infants as well as a larger increase in the number of words that their infant understood and could vocalize. Intervention group children also showed substantially greater gains on a measure of sustained attention.Conclusions In line with evidence from HICs, a dialogic book-sharing programme delivered to an impoverished South African sample was shown to be of considerable benefit to the development of child language and focussed attention. The training programme, which is simple and inexpensive to deliver, has the potential to benefit child cognitive development in LMIC contexts where such development is commonly compromised.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 11/2014;