Journal of Change Management (J Change Manag )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Given the additional pressures of new technology, global competition and changing markets, companies are increasingly encountering the need for strategic level transformation. This transformation encompasses all parts of a business, its structure, processes, resources, technology and its culture. Success goes to those who can visualize how markets are changing, identify new configurations of service or delivery and "change the rules of the game". The Journal of Change Management provides an international, peer-reviewed forum to explore all the strategic and tactical factors affecting and effecting change in organizations today: Original, applied articles by leading international practitioners, expert consultants and respected academics; Hands-on case studies from blue-chip companies worldwide; Book reviews summarising content and assessing relevance; Each article is subjected to peer review to ensure the journal is authoritative, accessible and relevant.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Journal of Change Management website
  • Other titles
    Journal of change management (Online)
  • ISSN
    1469-7017
  • OCLC
    49912005
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The overarching theme of this special issue is the study of organizational change processes from the perspective of the individual participant of change. This type of study is particularly relevant because of the increasing awareness of the crucial role played by professionals in current society. Three different studies show how and why individuals cope with change processes imposed upon them in different sectors (media, employment programmes, schools) and different countries (Sweden, Ireland, Italy). The professionals in these studies either re-worked (Norbäck et al.), re-constructed (Mulhall) or re-activated (Cicotto et al.) their altered work contexts in a manner that is acceptable, useful and often even profitable to the professional workers. Our special issue shows that flexibility and coping strategies are important and dynamic mechanisms that play a crucial role in the current organizational change research.
    Journal of Change Management 10/2014; 14(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Based on an extensive qualitative study, this article explores how professional workers in an organization, in this case television programme makers at a public broadcaster, cope with the complex changes that occur when their professional practices as well as their organization are in the midst of turbulent times. Departing from a process perspective to organizational change and insights from Bakhtin's notion of ‘double-voicing’, which means that people borrow other people's words in their own talk, two main contributions are offered. First, we show how stability cannot be taken for granted but rather takes continuous work. This work is conceptualized through the notion of ‘stabilizing movements’ in which other people's voices can be used to legitimate one's own practices and thereby create a space for one's own actions. In this way, stabilizing movements can create a feeling of stability, and a sense of a stabilized platform for action. Second, the research shows the need for inquiring into the contextualizing work carried out by professional workers during change. Thus, we find that there is no context ‘out there’ as a given. Rather, this study points at the importance of studying the contextualizing work people continuously do in various ways where different contexts are created and re-worked in the professionals' practices.
    Journal of Change Management 10/2014; 14(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This research article focuses on experiences of involuntary job loss following organizational change as occasions for career (re)construction. Using narrative inquiry, it explores the career stories of four former professionals on an Irish active labour market programme assisting the long-term unemployed to transition to employment. The article portrays how, and in what ways, the participants respond when confronted with transformation. Offering an empirically grounded understanding of the character and conduct of those encountering transition with greater nuance than that currently found in the literature, the article comprehends the approach that the former professionals use to (re)construct their career strategies. By integrating the concepts of the fateful moment and sensemaking, the article locates career identity within its wider societal and organizational contexts. It outlines the reactions of the professionals to the involuntary job loss by describing the criteria they use to evaluate their career success (‘envisionment’) and recounting their perception of control over their career outcomes (‘enactment’). The article identifies four possible career (re)construction strategies – changed envisionment/changed enactment, constant envisionment/changed enactment, constant envisionment/constant enactment and changed envisionment/constant enactment. Three new categories of career success are proposed to take account of the participant's altered career scripts – ‘monetarists’, ‘recognition seekers’ and ‘security seekers’.
    Journal of Change Management 10/2014; 14(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Existing studies provide limited perspectives on consequences of corporate attempts to co-opt employees' identities and gain their commitment to management-espoused, values-based culture change, especially when employees perceive that managers are not living the required values. We conducted a grounded, empirical study within the Australian financial sector and explored employees' narrated experiences of living through a strategic cultural change programme, one which fostered strong social identification with the organization. Employees' informal folkloric activities privately validated (or otherwise) the corporate values through management's enactment of them: a derived and interpretative process we describe as employee ‘received practice’. When employees negatively experienced critical incidents, they had no legitimate avenue for contested meaning-making activities to resolve their concern; there was no available ‘negotiated practice’. Employee disengagement, diminished commitment and loss of discretionary energy resulted. Contributing to theory building, this paper presents ‘commitment through contestation’ as a sustainable, co-created corporate culture process. We propose that design of a conducive and situated environment, which validates folkloric discourse and includes employees in controversial dialogue within a relationship of mutuality, may foster sustainable cultural change by the addressing of value-threatening events and by allowing reaffirmation of both employee identification and their conditional commitment to the organization.
    Journal of Change Management 07/2014; 14(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Organizations are faced with fast-paced change and the need to ensure ongoing change intervention success. There is, however, evidence that employees who have experienced poor change management in the past are more likely to resist new changes. This is because poor change management is likely to create more adverse attitudes towards new changes, such attitudes in turn are likely to increase employees' resistance to change, a key factor for change failure, which can further contribute to an employee's perception of poor change management. We, in response to this, identify key elements which create positive change evaluations and adopt a socio-cognitive approach, the schematic approach, in discussing these. Bootstrapped mediation analysis of survey data collected from 228 employees suggests that different types of organizational support and change participation are key in creating a positive change evaluation. Specifically, the analysis shows that the relationships between perceived organizational support and supervisor support and change evaluation are mediated respectively fully and partially by change participation. Co-worker support, further, is directly related to employee's change evaluations. These very elements of the change process, we argue, are directly modifiable by change agents and are, therefore, of real practical value when seeking to increase future change intervention success.
    Journal of Change Management 07/2014; 14(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Time and temporality has, for the most part, evaded thorough examination and is often sidestepped or assumed to be a non-contentious issue in frameworks that seek to explain organizational change. Temporality (past, present and future) contrasts with atemporal and tenseless conceptions of time where change is viewed as a series of ‘now’ moments in which the past and future are represented as social constructions that serve to make sense of an ongoing present. In the field of organizational change, time remains integral but opaque in theorization and implicit in the explanations captured in macro planned and episodic models characterized by linear temporality in which changes progress through a series of sequential stages, through to the more micro explanations of emergence that focus on continuous reconstituted becoming in changing organizations. This poor conceptualization of time requires attention to further develop theorization and enable researchers to engage in richer empirical work. The article unpacks conceptions of time that underpin change theories and suggests that the concepts of temporal orientation, awareness and accommodation can be used to open up and reflect upon temporality in generating a wider debate and furthering discussions on the place of time in understanding processes of change in organizations.
    Journal of Change Management 07/2014; 14(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article explores triggers of organizational change. In particular, how the likelihood of future changes is influenced by duration between the changes, the number of previous changes, and the surrounding conditions. Rule changes are analysed by examining factors that influence US states to update their excise tax rates on beer and cigarettes using panel data for 48 contiguous states. We provide evidence in favour of the deceleration hypothesis: prior changes of a given type decrease the likelihood of a subsequent change of the same type. We found support that the likelihood of organizational change increases with duration (the time between the changes). States updated their beer and cigarette tax rates in response to accumulation of inflation not letting the rates to become obsolete. Finally, our results indicate that changes in surrounding conditions positively influence the probability of change. State legislators take the opportunity of changes in the neighbouring states to change their own taxes. A logit model to estimate the probability of change and a hazard model to estimate the time to change are employed.
    Journal of Change Management 07/2014; 14(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article explores organizational cynicism in the context of a major organizational change process. Cynicism has been viewed as a form of resistance driven by unsuccessful implementation of organizational change or, in contrast, as a direct negative attitude towards management. Drawing upon the interview data with regiment managers, this article analyses how unit managers describe organizational changes that their units have endured during a longer period of time. The empirical data suggest that rather than an expression of failed organizational change, managerial incompetence, or a general mistrust in management, organizational cynicism can be seen as organizational members' response to perceived changes and an effort to create a consistent image of everyday activities and formal organizational structures. In this non-instrumental view of organizational cynicism, any attempt to analyse the impact of organizational change on organizational cynicism must therefore take into account the possibility that organizational members actively take part in translating organizational change through what we call paradoxification, that is, by identifying contradictions and inconsistencies between the formal decisions made and their effects in the local setting, rather than other forms of resistance.
    Journal of Change Management 07/2014; 14(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper theorizes the impact of regret in institutional persistence and change. We articulate a framework modelling how decision-maker regret influences how organizations respond to institutional pressures. The extent to which individuals anticipate regret or deal with previous regrettable experiences leads to the choice of either isomorphic (i.e. more conformist) or non-isomorphic (i.e. less conformist) institutional outcomes. Identifying differences in this response connects regret to institutional arrangements, bringing the individual back to the institution. Doing so, the paper addresses the acknowledged lack of specific attention to micro-level meaning systems in institutional theory, and tangentially deals with the silence in regret research on broader institutional consequences. We conclude by discussing how regret demonstrates an alternative explanation of how divergent organizational responses can occur in similar institutional contexts.
    Journal of Change Management 07/2014; 14(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Change is a ubiquitous notion that fascinates and frustrates. The starting point for most attempts at theorizing change begins with the philosophical assumption that stability and equilibrium are fundamental features of reality. Organizational change, therefore, is construed as something exceptional requiring active intervention on the part of actors. Change has to be carefully ‘managed’ because it is something made to happen to or within an ‘organization’. This, however, is not the only way of understanding organizational change. From an alternative process-philosophical outlook, all of reality is change so that it is the phenomenon of organization itself that is a remarkable achievement. From this process outlook, ‘organizations’ are nothing more than stabilized patterns of relations forged out of an underlying sea of ceaseless change. In this paper, I make a distinction between ‘owned’ and ‘unowned’ processes of change. I show that acknowledging the pervasive presence of ‘unowned’ change processes leads to the adoption of a more benign approach to managing change; one in which ‘letting happen’ take precedence over active intervention. Managing change then is more about small, timely and quiet insertions made to release the immanent forces of change always already present in every organizational situation. Change then appears unexceptionally as a naturally occurring phenomenon; it does not attract undue attention and does not generate unnecessary anxieties. Obliqueness of engagement is key to managing sustainable change in a world that is itself ever-changing.
    Journal of Change Management 01/2014; 14(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In order to investigate the drivers that impact on the success of change projects, a major research project was commenced in 1998. Extensive quantitative studies of organizational change processes were conducted across industries, countries and companies, in order to establish the determinants of successful change projects. This article presents the initial step in this project, the development of a descriptive model that provides the basis for the assessment of change projects and the analysis of interactions between key success factors and performance outcomes. Forty-four survey questions were put to 117,355 employees involved in or affected by organizational change. The results of factor analyses were used to guide the development of a descriptive model of the drivers of performance in organizational change projects. This article presents the results of the factor analyses, and the ChangeTracking model that has been developed. The ChangeTracking model consists of: two outcome variables, realizing business benefits and business performance; and six key drivers, the amount of change and turbulence, available resources, alignment with the company's vision and direction, quality of change management, work roles and emotional energy. The ChangeTracking model provides an empirically derived model of change management to guide future research and practice.
    Journal of Change Management 01/2014; 14(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose is to explore the inherent complexity of Kurt Lewin's force field theory through applied analysis of organizational case examples and related methods. The methodology applies a range of tools from the consultancy research domain, including force field analysis of complex organizational scenarios, and applies bricolage and corroboration to emerging discoveries from semi-structured interviews, author experience, critical reflection and literature survey. Findings are that linear representation of internal and external forces in organizational applications of field theory does not fully explain the paradox of inverse vectors in the forces of change. The force field is not an impermeable thing; instead, it morphs. Examples of the inverse principle and its effects are detailed and extended in this analysis. The implications of the research are that force field analysis and related change processes promoted in organizational change literature run the risk of missing key complexities. The inclusion of the inverse principle can provide enhanced, holistic understanding of the prevailing forces for change. The augmentation of the early work of Kurt Lewin, and extension of previous analyses of his legacy in the Journal of Change Management and elsewhere, provide, in this article, change analysis insights that align well with current organizational environments.
    Journal of Change Management 01/2014; 14(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Using the tenets of institutional and dilemma theory, this paper identifies the core dilemmas underlying the decision making in the transformation into a municipal enterprise form in the three case organizations. The focus is on the expectations and outcomes of the change processes. The results show that the dilemmas as well as the isomorphic forces affect the institutional process in diminishing or enhancing the isomorphism. The paper thus illustrates how dilemmas, together with isomorphic forces, are connected to decision making. It further highlights the need to investigate strategic dilemma management as a tool for resolving contradictory aims in the management of change in the public healthcare sector.
    Journal of Change Management 01/2014; 14(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Since the relatively recent unethical behaviour of some employees in various organizations has been publicized, organizational scientists and management practitioners have correctly attributed this behaviour to an organization's culture. However, based on our analysis of the case we describe in this manuscript and the existing ethics literature, we argue that there is a need to begin investigating factors here-to-fore that have been omitted in past research on why people behave unethically. We apply Schein's (2004) framework of organizational culture (i.e. artefacts, espoused beliefs and values, and underlying assumptions) and the stakeholder theory of management (i.e. the satisfaction of legal, economic, moral, and philanthropic responsibilities) in describing the evolution and transformation of the HealthSouth (HS) Corporation (a Birmingham, AL-based healthcare company) organizational culture from its founding in 1984 to 2011. In 2003, a former chief financial officer of HS turned whistleblower and revealed that the company had been fraudulently reporting earnings since 1996. Once the investigation began, 16 executives were found to be guilty of a $2.7 billion fraud. From published documents available in the public domain and from information provided by the current CEO, we describe the details of the fraud, the turnaround of HS, and the transformation of the finance/accounting organizational culture. Because of the cultural transformation, the company is now a profitable and reputable company.
    Journal of Change Management 01/2014; 14(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study extends the moral identity literature to show how followers' moral identity acts as a perceptual filter of leaders' honesty. Participants witnessed political leaders either lying or telling the truth in an experiment. Followers were more satisfied with honest leaders, and this effect was moderated by followers' moral identity: the more central morality was to followers' self-identity, the more negatively they rated leaders who lied. In contrast, moral identity was unrelated to satisfaction with the leaders who told the truth. The finding contributes to the moral identity literature by showing how moral identity acts as a perceptual filter that heightens awareness of the situation. It has implications for the leader integrity and more general leadership literature by indicating that follower characteristics are important antecedents to perceptions. Contrary to expectations, no similar moderating impact of value congruence with the leader was found.
    Journal of Change Management 01/2014; 14(1).