Annals of the rheumatic diseases (Ann Rheum Dis )

Publisher: Arthritis and Rheumatism Council for Research in Great Britain and the Commonwealth, BMJ Publishing Group

Description

First published in 1939, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (ARD) features original work on all aspects of rheumatology and disorders of the connective tissue. Topical leaders and reviews are commissioned to address the wider aspects of rheumatology. Fully international, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases publishes clinical, epidemiological and laboratory reports, hypothesis articles and clinical teaching (including diagnostic radiology cases and Lesson of the Month). Concise scientific communication is encouraged and peer-reviewed proceedings of international meetings are featured within monthly issues.

  • Impact factor
    8.11
  • 5-year impact
    6.96
  • Cited half-life
    5.30
  • Immediacy index
    2.19
  • Eigenfactor
    0.07
  • Article influence
    2.12
  • Website
    Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases website
  • Other titles
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases (Online)
  • ISSN
    1468-2060
  • OCLC
    41233919
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

BMJ Publishing Group

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 6 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • On author or institutional server only
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • If funding agency rules apply, authors may post articles in PubMed Central and mirror sites, as required by funding agency
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To compare the sensitivity and specificity of different classification criteria for gout in early and established disease.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ROSUVASTATIN AND OLMESARTAN IMPROVE INFLAMMATION AND ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS A. Syngle 1, N. Garg 2, P. Krishan 2. 1Cardio Rheuma, Cardio Rheuma & Healing Touch City Clinic, Chandigarh and Senior Consultant Physician and Rheumatologist Fortis Multi Speciality Hospital, Mohali, India., Chandigarh. 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences & Drug Research, Punjabi University, Patiala, India Background: Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of excessive morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Atherosclerosis and RA share similar pathogenetic mechanisms1. Rosuvastatin and olmesartan improve inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in non-rheumatic patients but it has not yet been investigated in rheumatic patients. Objectives: To investigate the effects of Rosuvastatin and Olmesartan on inflammation and endothelial function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis Methods: Forty five RA patients fulfilling the 2010 Rheumatoid Arthritis classification criteria were randomized into 3 groups to receive 6 months treatment with rosuvastatin (10 mg/day, n=15), olmesartan (10 mg/day, n=15) and placebo (n=15) as an adjunct to existing stable antirheumatic drugs. Flow mediated dilatation (FMD) was assessed by Angiodefender™ (Everest Genomic Ann Arbor, United States). Inflammatory measures included Disease activity score of 28 joints (DAS28), CRP and ESR, pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1), serum nitrite and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) and levels of lipids were measured at baseline and after treatment Results: At baseline, all inflammatory measures, pro-inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules were elevated and endothelial function impaired among all the three groups. After 6 months of therapy, FMD increased by 67.1%, 44.1% and 6.1%, in the rosuvastatin, olmesartan and placebo groups respectively. (Fig.1A) and DAS28 significantly reduced by 55.2%, 25% and 7.5%, in the rosuvastatin, olmesartan and placebo groups respectively, (Fig.1B). Both rosuvastatin and olmesartan significantly decreased serum CRP and TNF-α as compared with placebo. Rosuvastatin also significantly improved ESR, IL-6, ICAM-1and serum nitrite concentration after 6 months but olmesartan and placebo had no significant change in these measures. IL-1 showed insignificant changes in the both drug groups and placebo. Rosuvastatin produced significant reductions in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol but there were no significant changes in the lipid profile in recipients of olmesartan and placebo. Olmesartan significantly reduced blood pressure compared with rosuvastatin and placebo. Significant negative correlation observed between FMD and IL-6 and TNF-α after treatment with rosuvastatin where as a significant inverse correlation was found between FMD and TNF-α after treatment with olmesartan Conclusions: First study to show that rosuvastatin and olmesartan improve inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in RA. Both rosuvastatin and Olmesartan lowers the pro-inflammatory cytokines especially IL-6 and TNF-α which down regulates the production of CRP and NO and improves the inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. However, Rosuvastatin in addition also favourably impacted ICAM-1 and lipid abnormalities. In contrast, olmesartan has beneficial effect on blood pressure. Thus both rosuvastatin and olmesartan have anti-inflammatory and vasculoprotective effects in RA mediated through anti-proinflammatory cytokine action. References: [1] Sattar N et al., Circulation. 2003; 108:2957-63. Acknowledgements: This study was supported by Research Grant from Universal Grant Commission, New Delhi [F. No.41-725/2012 (SR)]. Disclosure of Interest: None declared
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a systemic disease marked by the dysfunction and destruction of exocrineglands due to lymphocytic infiltration. pSS patients may develop a large number of systemic manifestations. Mucocutaneousmanifestations are one of the most typical extraglandular features of pSS. A wide spectrum cutaneous lesions, includingleucocytoclastic vasculitis, mononuclear vasculitis, urticarial vasculitis, alopecia, non-specific photosensitive cutaneous lesions,vitiligo, cutaneous amyloidosis, annular granuloma, erythema multiforme have been reported in pSS patients. Objectives The aim of this work is to study the demographic, clinical, serologic features and outcomes of Tunisian patients withpSS and mucocutaneaous involvement. Methods It is a single-center retrospective study including all the cases of pSS diagnosed since 1998 until 2011 in InternalMedicine Department from Tunis in Tunisia. All the patients fulfilled the 2002 American-European Consensus Group (AECG)criteria for pSS Results The study include 31 patients: 4 men and 27 women. The age average was 51 years. Dryness of the mouth and eyes wasobserved in all the cases. Among them, 10 patients presented mucocutaneous manifestations: purpura in 7 cases, erythema multiformein 2 cases associated with livedo in one of them and one case of severe skin dryness.In the cases of the purpura, the skin biopsy have revealed leucocytoclastic vasculitis. There was no other disease associated with pSS.One patient with leucocytoclastic vasculitis have developed sensory axonal neuropathy. In the patient with erythema multiforme andlivedo, the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma of the parotids was diagnosed.A diffuse dry itchy skin especially in the lower limbs was observed in a patient. The skin biopsy showed the presence of a lymphochronic inflammatory infiltrate organized in nodules around the excretory canals of the sweat glands of the skin. A hypohidrosis hasbeen diagnosed. Conclusions During the pSS, the most common clinical manifestation is mouth and eyes dryness. But extraglandularmanifestations are frequent. Skin involvement is one of the most typical systemic features of pSS often underestimated. Disclosure of Interest None declared
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 06/2014; 73(S2):986.
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    ABSTRACT: Background Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a systemic disorder characterized by lymphocytic infiltration and progressivedestruction of exocrine glands. The inflammatory process extends beyond the exocrine glands and can potentially affect any organ.pSS patients may develop a large number of systemic manifestations including neurological, renal, pulmonary and hematologicalmanifestations. While sicca features primarily affect the quality of life and cause local complications in the mucosa involved,systemic involvement marks the disease prognosis. Objectives The goal of this work is to study the demographic, clinical, serologic features and outcomes of Tunisian patients withpSS. Methods It is a single-center retrospective study including all the cases of pSS diagnosed since 1998 until 2011 in InternalMedicine Department from Tunis in Tunisia. All the patients fulfilled the 2002 American-European Consensus Group (AECG)criteria for pSS. Results The study include 31 patients: 4 men and 27 women. The age average was 51 years. Dryness of the mouth and eyes wasobserved in all the cases. Immunological assays showed that the anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibodies were both positive in 96% ofpatients. Extra-glandular manifestations were found in 87% of cases, revealing the disease in 77% of patients. In 45% of pSS cases,the Sjögren's syndrome was revealed only by systemic manifestations without any glandular symptom.Musculoskeletal manifestations, were the most frequent, observed in 67% of the cases. Leucocytoclastic vasculitis and neurologicalinvolvement was noted in 23% of patients each one. Raynaud's phenomenon was observed in 13% of cases as was the pulmonaryinvolvement. Interstitial nephritis was diagnosed in 3 patients. Hematological manifestations were marked by autoimmune hemolyticanemia in 3 cases and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) in one case.Corticosteroids were given in 10 of our patients. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) were used for 12 patients andantimalarial for 3 cases.The disease outcomes was marked by good evolution. But, malignant lymphoma occurs in a woman after 40 months of primary Sjögren's syndrome past history. Conclusions During the pSS, the most common clinical manifestation is mouth and eyes dryness. But glandular manifestations arenot always in the foreground. pSS has no one specific clinical or biological sign that makes it diagnosis easy. Clinicians should notignore this condition. Because it displays the highest incidence of malignant lymphoproliferative disorders among autoimmunediseases, pSS should be diagnosed as early as possible. Disclosure of Interest None declared
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 06/2014; 73(S2):985-986.
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Sexuality is an often neglected area in patients with rheumatic disease. Objectives: The aim of this study is to assess sexual functioning and quality of life in a group of married women with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). Methods: This is a horizontal study for descriptive and analytical purposes. Married women with SSc were interviewed about their sexual functioning and their quality of life. Results: A total of ten patients who met the criteria have accepted to participate to the study. Their mean age was 52, 4±8,2 years. Eight women thought that the disease had affected their sexual activity. All patients reported a decrease in the frequency of intercourse since the onset of their disease. Eight of the sample reported a diminished desire for a sexual relationship. The reasons were fatigue, altered body image and pain. The assessment of sexual functioning using the Female sexual function index (FSFI) showed a mean FSFI score at 14,2±7,8 with nine women scoring in the range associated with sexual dysfunction (SD) (<26). All the subscales were affected. Our patients reported a mean total score on WHOQOL-brief (World Health Quality of Life-Brief Version) of 60 out of 120 indicating a moderate altered quality of life. Depression has been identified as determinants of impaired sexual function. Conclusions: The prevalence of SD in women with SSc is high when a specific questionnaire is used to assess it. These results indicate that in daily practice, inquiring about sexuality and screening for depressive symptoms is indicated for every patient with SSc. References: [1] Impens AJ, Seibold JR. Vascular Alterations and Sexual Function in Systemic Sclerosis International Journal of Rheumatology 2010; 2010:139020. [2] Knafo R, Thombs BD, Jewett LR, Hudson M, Wigley F, Haythonthwaite JA. (Not) talking about sex: a systematic comparison of sexual impairment in women with systemic sclerosis and other chronic disease samples. Rheumatology 2009;48:1300-3. [3] Knafo R, Haythornthwaite JA, Heinberg L, Wigley FM, Thombs BD. The association of body image dissatisfaction and pain with reduced sexual function in women with systemic sclerosis. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011; 50 (6):1125-30. [4] Levis B, Hudson M, Knafo R, et al. Canadian Scleroderma Research Group (CSRG). Rates and correlates of sexual activity and impairment among women with systemic sclerosis. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012;64(3):340-50. [5] Guerriere JA, Rosen RC, Seibold JR. Quality of life and sexual function in women with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Arthritis Rheum 2001; 44 Suppl: S328.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 06/2014; 73(Supplement 2):1010-1011.
  • Annals of the rheumatic diseases 06/2014; 73(6):951-953.
  • Annals of the rheumatic diseases 06/2014; 73(6):949-950.
  • Annals of the rheumatic diseases 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to determine the expression pattern, regulation and function of CCL28 and CCR10 in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis. Expression of CCL28 and CCR10 was assessed in RA compared with other arthritis synovial tissues (STs) or fluids (SFs) by histology or ELISA. The factors modulating CCL28 and CCR10 expression were identified in RA myeloid and endothelial cells by ELISA, FACS and Western blotting. The mechanism by which CCL28 ligation promotes RA angiogenesis was examined in control and CCR10-knockdown endothelial cell chemotaxis and capillary formation. CCL28 and/or CCR10 expression levels were accentuated in STs and SFs of patients with joint disease compared with normal controls and they were predominately coexpressed in RA myeloid and endothelial cells. We show that protein expression of CCL28 and CCR10 was modulated by tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and toll-like receptor 4 ligation in RA monocytes and endothelial cells and by interleukin (IL)-6 stimulation in RA macrophages. Neutralisation of CCL28 in RA SF or blockade of CCR10 on human endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) significantly reduced SF-induced endothelial migration and capillary formation, demonstrating that ligation of joint CCL28 to endothelial CCR10+ cells is involved in RA angiogenesis. We discovered that angiogenesis driven by ligation of CCL28 to CCR10 is linked to the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) cascade, as CCR10-knockdown cells exhibit dysfunctional CCL28-induced ERK signalling, chemotaxis and capillary formation. The overexpression of CCL28 and CCR10 in RA ST and their contribution to EPC migration into RA joints support the CCL28/CCR10 cascade as a potential therapeutic target for RA.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 05/2014;
  • Annals of the rheumatic diseases 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Many female rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients attempting to conceive have a time to pregnancy (TTP) of >12 months. During this period RA often cannot be treated optimally. We sought to identify clinical factors associated with prolonged TTP in female RA patients. In a nationwide prospective cohort study on pregnancy in RA patients (PARA study), women were included preconceptionally or during the first trimester. Cox regression analysis was used to study the association of disease characteristics and medication use with TTP. TTP exceeded 12 months in 42% of 245 patients. Longer TTP was related to age, nulliparity, disease activity (DAS28), and preconception use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and prednisone. These variables were independently associated with TTP, with HRs for occurrence of pregnancy of 0.96 (95% CI 0.92 to 1.00) per year of age, 0.52 (0.38 to 0.70) for nulliparity, 0.81 (0.71 to 0.93) per point increase in DAS28, 0.66 (0.46 to 0.94) for NSAIDs and 0.61 (0.45 to 0.83) for prednisone use. The impact of prednisone use was dose dependent, with significantly longer TTP when daily dose was >7.5 mg. Smoking, disease duration, rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated protein antibodies, past methotrexate use, and preconception sulfasalazine use did not prolong TTP. TTP in RA is longer if patients are older or nulliparous, have higher disease activity, use NSAIDs or use prednisone >7.5 mg daily. Preconception treatment strategies should aim at maximum suppression of disease activity, taking account of possible negative effects of NSAIDs use and higher prednisone doses.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP) is of uncertain significance for knee osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to describe the longitudinal associations between baseline IPFP maximal area and changes in knee pain, knee cartilage volume and cartilage defects in older adults. 356 community-dwelling male and female adults aged 50-80 years were measured at baseline and approximately 2.6 years later. T1-weighted or T2-weighted fat-suppressed MRI was used to assess maximal IPFP area, cartilage volume and cartilage defects at baseline and/or follow-up. Knee pain was assessed by the self-administered Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index questionnaire. After adjustment for confounders, IPFP maximal area in women was significantly and negatively associated with changes in knee pain (β: -0.18 to -0.86 for total knee pain, pain at night while in bed, pain when sitting/lying and pain when standing upright, all p<0.05) but not with other knee pain subscales. IPFP maximal area in women was beneficially associated with change in tibial cartilage volume per annum (β: +1.56% per cm(2) at medial site; +0.86% per cm(2) at lateral site, both p<0.05), but not with change in patellar cartilage volume. Further, it was significantly associated with reduced risks of increases in medial cartilage defects (relative risk: 0·46 at tibial site, relative risk: 0.59 at femoral site; both p<0.05) but not with increases at other sites in women. No significant associations were found in men. While the associations are not fully consistent, IPFP maximal area appears to have a protective role for knee symptoms and cartilage damage in older female adults.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 05/2014;
  • Annals of the rheumatic diseases 05/2014;